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New to Building: Need Some Advice

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  • New Build
  • Cases
  • Computer
  • Motherboards
  • Systems
  • Product
Last response: in Systems
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October 4, 2010 10:54:17 PM

So I'm looking to assemble my first computer and I found a pretty good deal on Newegg (given my price range and what I want to get out of my computer).

I am quite confused when it comes to the motherboard/case configuration.

This is the motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This is the case: Newegg.com - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I looked at the configuration of outputs on the motherboard and it doesn't match up with the case at all. Is this normal? The board is ATX as is the case.

I also don't see how the front audio/USB ports work with the motherboard. I'm assuming there are some cables that run on the inside of the computer to the ports?

I'm honestly confused here and would appreciate any help I can get.

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a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 11:08:38 PM

It will fit fine, the panel on the back of the case pops out and is replaced by the one that comes with the motherboard, there are also cables in the case that plug into headers on the motherboard to make your front USB/audio ports work.
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a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 11:14:20 PM

The board is micor ATX (mATX)and will fit fine in the case.

The motherboard has a backpanel shield that will replace the shield that (may) come installed in the case. You pop one out, pop the other in, and you've customized the case :) 

The case has connectors that will attach to USB sockets and front panel connectors on the motherboard. They are on the right edge of the mob as you look at the Newegg photo, zoom it in. Better, download the manual and take a quick read - it will show you.
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October 4, 2010 11:25:12 PM

Thanks guys. My only fear was the case wasn't going to be compatible. I really hate to be 'that guy' that asks a lot of questions but I have one more:

Is a wooden desk with a glass top fine for assembling the computer?
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a b V Motherboard
October 4, 2010 11:35:48 PM

Yes, just don't shuffle your feet standing on the carpet lol.
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October 4, 2010 11:44:00 PM

Well that sure ruins my plans.
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a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 12:41:14 AM

Seriously, reasonable care about static electricity is almost always enough. But here's two things I've done that work (other than buying a wirst ground strap.)

Your psu can usually be installed after you've got the mobo together and installed. So its available as a grounding touch-pad. Plug it in, power switch off. Touching its metal case will discharge you into the wall and not moving your feet thereafter works. You can also carefully lay it on the case (metal to metal). The case is then grounded, too.

If you have a long enough piece of "bell wire" (any thin gauge wire) you can strip one end and attach it to the center screw of an electic outlet cover . . . if the box behind it is metal. Stripping the other end and wrapping it around your wrist makes it a wrist grounding strap.

Enjoy the build. If you need us, we'll be here.
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a b V Motherboard
October 5, 2010 2:46:36 AM

Dunno, but I like mine :) 

Let me check . . .

Nope - they were doing well until "If using thermal paste, apply it only to the CPU die (the square piece of silicon in the middle of the CPU) . . . " which is confusing to the point of trouble.

Try Tom's. This link is to a page of useful links, and the "Step by Step Guide . . ." is at the bottom:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/288241-31-read-posting-buyer-guides-troubleshooting

BTW, if you are using the stock cooler that comes with the cpu, no paste need be applied. The heat sink comes with pre-applied thermal paste. And for your first build ignore all advice to the contrary.

Pick the "hardest" corner of the heat sink, and insert it first. Usually that's one of the corners nearest the memory sockets. Next do the diagonally opposite corner, then the remaining two corners. Make sure the split white pins go through the motherboard to the other side, and when you push the center black pin down, it forces the white pins outward to grab the back of the motherboard. It's easy when you get it right, and just as easy to get wrong.

Finally the best advice I can give:

- Go slowly and enjoy the build.
- Do not try to do two things at once.
- Open the case, look inside, and visualize the install sequence. You won't predict all the problems, but "having been through it once" before you start sometimes helps.
- It's normally best to install the cpu, heatsink, and memory on the mobo just after installing the standoffs in the case (if necessary) and just before installing the mobo in the case. But that can depend on the case itself.
- If you find a part is difficult to install, don't be afraid to disassemble stuff to make it easier. The "best" installation sequence can vary from case to case.
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October 11, 2010 11:59:29 PM

Best answer selected by 67726e.
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