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SATA hard drive not detected in Disc Manager

Last response: in Storage
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January 15, 2013 10:17:18 AM

Hello, sorry at my poor english language.
I have a new Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 hard drive, which is the second SATA hard drive in my computer, in the second SATA jack. It was detected in BIOS, detected in the Device Manager/Disc Drives. The Properties shows "This device is working properly".
But the device not detected as "Disk 1" in the Disk Manager lower right window. Only the first hard drive (Disk 0) and the DVD drive (CD-ROM 0) seem in the window.
I have a hard drive, i am unable to use it.
OldMike
a b G Storage
January 15, 2013 10:43:39 AM

you have to format the new drive before you can use it
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a c 342 G Storage
January 15, 2013 3:18:53 PM

Here's a possibility to check IF you are using Windows XP. This idea does NOT apply if you are using Vista or Win 7 or 8.

Windows XP never had a "built-in" driver for SATA devices - only for PATA (IDE) devices. Normally, this means that XP would need the proper driver added so it can use a SATA device. But there is a work-around in most mobos to allow you to avoid this, if you wish. We'll get to that.

So, only IF you are using Win XP (or a previous Windows), the "normal" way to solve this problem is to install a device driver for the SATA drive (or it may be referred to as an AHCI device, which is really what a SATA drive is). This process would allow you to use the drive as a true AHCI device for data storage and retrieval, but NOT allow you to boot from it. I think that is what you are trying to do. You need the SATA (or AHCI) device driver for your mobo for this, and usually it is on the CD (or DVD) disk that came with your system or mobo. Look in the manual, and on that optical disk, for a utility that will install such a driver in your Win XP (or whichever version) Operating System, and follow the instructions. Do NOT worry about the complicated procedure for putting the driver on a floppy disk and installing it using the "F6" key during the first installation of Win XP. That is ONLY if you need to make this SATA disk a boot disk. Look for the way to install the driver ONLY on an already-install Win XP so that the new SATA drive can be used for data storage and retrieval.

Once this i s done, your Win XP will boot as usual from your current older boot drive and load (also from there) the driver needed to access the SATA drive. Then you can use it. But since it must load the OS first, and then the driver, it cannot BOOT from that new drive. A different process is needed if you wish to boot from it, but I understand that it not your need.

Now, the "work-around" I mentioned. Because this was a problem for many users when SATA drives were introduced at almost the same time as Win XP, most mobo manufacturers added a trick to the BIOS they use. This trick allows Win XP to use the SATA drive without having any extra driver software installed. In the BIOS Setup screens where you configure the SATA ports, there is usually a line for SATA Port Mode, and the options you can choose are things like "IDE (PATA) Emulation", "Native SATA", "AHCI", and RAID". Normally you only use RAID if you actually are trying to set up a RAID array, and you do NOT appear to want to do that. Setting the port to AHCI or Native SATA makes the drive work the way it should, but does require installation of the driver in Win XP. But if you set this to "IDE (or PATA) Emulation" mode, the BIOS intervenes and makes the actual SATA drive appear to Win XP to be a plain old IDE drive that it can use easily, and it all just works with no driver added. The downside of this is that you lose a few small enhancements that true SATA drives offer, but many users never need those features anyway.

Now, some BIOS's allow you to set this option independently for each SATA port. If that is your situation, check how that option is set already on the first SATA port that already has a working SATA old drive. Whatever that setting is, you should make the second SATA port mode the same. Other BIOS's make the choice apply to ALL of the SATA ports; if yours works this way, do NOT change it - it already is working for your other SATA ports, and you don't want to change them.

As I said, all this ONLY applies if you are using Win XP (or a previous Windows). VISTA and Win 7 and 8 "fixed" this issue by adding "built-in" drivers for AHCI devices, just as previous Windows has such tools for using IDE devices. If you are using Win XP, it is possible on some mobos to have some SATA ports (the two with your old drives) configured to IDE Emulation, but the other ports left by default to AHCI. If that is your system, Win XP cannot figure out the new drive on a AHCI-cofigured port, and you can change the configuration.
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January 15, 2013 4:48:56 PM

I have two SATA drives in my PC: a hard disk (two partitions C (with OS) and D (data), and a DVD-ROM. These are working properly. The new second hard drive not detected in the Disk Management.
Here are any BIOS settings in my PC:
(Motherboard Gigabyte GA-M68M-S2P rev. 2.3, Award BIOS FC version)

Standard CMOS Features:
IDE Channel 0 Master [None]
IDE Channel 0 Slave [None]
IDE Channel 2 Master [Firs hard drive code]
IDE Channel 3 Master [Second hard drive code]
IDE Channel 4 Master [DVD-ROM code]
IDE Channel 5 Master [None]

IDE Auto Detection [Press Enter]
Extended IDE Drive (all @AUTO)
Acces Mode (all @AUTO)

Advanced BIOS Features
HDD S.M.A.R.T Capability [Disabled]

Integrated Peripherials
On-Chip IDE Channel [Enabled]
NV Serial-ATA Controller [All Enabled]
IDE Prefetch Mode [Enabled]

Serial-ATA Raid Config
NV SATA RAID Function [Disabled]

Please comment those parameters, if you can. I know nothing about RAID config, but somebody told me not use.
Thanks
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January 17, 2013 6:01:59 PM

Sorry there is no change in my hard disk problem (disk not seems in Disk Management). But here is a screenshot (System Info): the capacity of the disk is 1 TB, however in the System Info 2 TB. That is awful, I'm not happy :cry: 
http://kepkezelo.com/images/zoewm8zm89tgxsnjd49.jpg
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a c 342 G Storage
January 18, 2013 12:50:51 AM

So System Info is reading it wrong, and Disk Manager can't even "see" it properly. MAYBE the HDD is faulty. Since it's from Seagate, go to their website and download their diagnostic utility, Seatools. I prefer the "For DOS" version you burn to a CD-R to make a self-bootable disk. But for this case the "For Windows" version would do OK, because you have a functioning version of Windows running. Install it on your C: drive, then use it to test the new unit. If it cannot even "find" the new unit, that's just about the end. In that case you could get the "For DOS" version and use that - it does not need Windows or any other pre-installed OS. Whatever you find, write down the info about any errors and contact Seagate Tech Support. They will want that info to help you and/or to create an RMA and replacement under warranty.
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January 18, 2013 6:08:55 AM

Paperdoc said:
So System Info is reading it wrong, and Disk Manager can't even "see" it properly. MAYBE the HDD is faulty. Since it's from Seagate, go to their website and download their diagnostic utility, Seatools. I prefer the "For DOS" version you burn to a CD-R to make a self-bootable disk. But for this case the "For Windows" version would do OK, because you have a functioning version of Windows running. Install it on your C: drive, then use it to test the new unit. If it cannot even "find" the new unit, that's just about the end. In that case you could get the "For DOS" version and use that - it does not need Windows or any other pre-installed OS. Whatever you find, write down the info about any errors and contact Seagate Tech Support. They will want that info to help you and/or to create an RMA and replacement under warranty.


Thank You for answer. I have a SeaTools program, but it not detected the drive. Maybe really faulty. Please tell me the method of burning "For Dos" version, because I don't know that process. At least I will contact Seagate Tech Support.
Many thanks
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a c 342 G Storage
January 19, 2013 5:18:18 PM

If you are using the "For Windows" version of Seatools, my guess is it will not be able to check the new HDD, because Windows itself cannot "find" it. You will need the "For DOS" version from the Seagate website.

That version is really an iso. file - that is, a file that is a complete image of the CD you must make by "burning" it to a CD-R. To do that you need CD burner software capable of "burning" an .iso image to a CD-R. One such is Nero, but many CD-burning software packages have this ability. You download the file, then use your software to "burn" that image to a blank CD-R (or CD+R ) disk. Then you place the disk in your CD or DVD reader (already in there from burning?) and reboot. You MUST have your BIOS Setup screen for Boot Priority Sequence set to boot first from the optical disk reader before trying the HDD. In this way the machine will boot from that new optical disk. It will actually load into RAM a small OS like DOS, establish a RAM disk for (temporary) file storage, and run a menu system to make its testing tools available. It probably will read the SMART data first and display that, then offer a menu of tests. Run the Short Test first. Write down any errors it finds. If the do not already indicate major failure, run the Long Test and again write down errors. THEN contact Seagate Tech Support and report those errors.
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January 22, 2013 7:42:01 AM

Paperdoc said:
If you are using the "For Windows" version of Seatools, my guess is it will not be able to check the new HDD, because Windows itself cannot "find" it. You will need the "For DOS" version from the Seagate website.

That version is really an iso. file - that is, a file that is a complete image of the CD you must make by "burning" it to a CD-R. To do that you need CD burner software capable of "burning" an .iso image to a CD-R. One such is Nero, but many CD-burning software packages have this ability. You download the file, then use your software to "burn" that image to a blank CD-R (or CD+R ) disk. Then you place the disk in your CD or DVD reader (already in there from burning?) and reboot. You MUST have your BIOS Setup screen for Boot Priority Sequence set to boot first from the optical disk reader before trying the HDD. In this way the machine will boot from that new optical disk. It will actually load into RAM a small OS like DOS, establish a RAM disk for (temporary) file storage, and run a menu system to make its testing tools available. It probably will read the SMART data first and display that, then offer a menu of tests. Run the Short Test first. Write down any errors it finds. If the do not already indicate major failure, run the Long Test and again write down errors. THEN contact Seagate Tech Support and report those errors.


Thank you for your help. I sent back the Seagate HDD to the shop, and they changed it to an WD10EZRX HDD. This operates well.
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Best solution

a c 342 G Storage
January 23, 2013 2:07:01 AM

Glad your problem is solved. I guess that's good proof the original (Seagate) was faulty.
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February 2, 2013 7:52:38 AM

Best answer selected by OldMike.
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