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What is a Win7 for system builders?

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October 6, 2010 8:30:45 PM

Is this going to work for me? I'm not reselling this. I just saw something about it. Should I return this and get a full copy?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

More about : win7 system builders

a b B Homebuilt system
October 6, 2010 11:09:07 PM

That is an OEM copy of Windows 7. It is different from retail in the following ways:

-No support from Microsoft (I think you get one call pro bono)
-The license is tied to the hardware you first install it on. You cannot transfer it to a new computer
-No fancy packaging
-I believe it must be purchased with at least one piece of hardware

Full copy is not worth it. OEM is what you want.
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October 6, 2010 11:51:57 PM

rwpritchett said:
That is an OEM copy of Windows 7. It is different from retail in the following ways:

-No support from Microsoft (I think you get one call pro bono)
-The license is tied to the hardware you first install it on. You cannot transfer it to a new computer
-No fancy packaging
-I believe it must be purchased with at least one piece of hardware

Full copy is not worth it. OEM is what you want.


My main concern is the ability to receive security updates. Is that still provided?
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 6, 2010 11:53:54 PM

Yes, it will be a fully functioning copy/license of Win7. It's just the legal stuff and fine print that are different. All updates will be applied to OEM.
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October 6, 2010 11:55:29 PM

rwpritchett said:
Yes, it will be a fully functioning copy/license of Win7. It's just the legal stuff and fine print that are different. All updates will be applied to OEM.


If I had an issue and needed to wipe the harddrive, can I still reinstall it?
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a b B Homebuilt system
October 7, 2010 12:06:45 AM

Yes, you can reinstall on the same hardware.
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October 7, 2010 12:30:53 AM

rwpritchett said:
Yes, you can reinstall on the same hardware.


What happens if you add a new videocard or any new hardware? An error pops up?
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October 7, 2010 1:21:05 AM

soknar said:
What happens if you add a new videocard or any new hardware? An error pops up?


A new video card will be fine, new hard drive, new CPU probably, new motherboard maybe.

If you install a new CPU and motherboard at the same time, you might run into some problems. I had some problems with an OEM version of vista (no it wasn't that vista has problems), when I changed motherboards and cpu's all I did was call Microsoft and using the automated key code option I got a new code that worked fine.
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October 7, 2010 1:24:59 AM

tkgclimb said:
A new video card will be fine, new hard drive, new CPU probably, new motherboard maybe.

If you install a new CPU and motherboard at the same time, you might run into some problems. I had some problems with an OEM version of vista (no it wasn't that vista has problems), when I changed motherboards and cpu's all I did was call Microsoft and using the automated key code option I got a new code that worked fine.


Wow. So they're pretty cool about it? I have the new Asus sabretooth mobo for my i7-950, but i was worried that i couldn't switch it out or the processor in the future.
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October 7, 2010 4:27:34 AM

I had an OEM version from a dell computer. With the dell I swapped out CPU's and I don't remember having any problems. Then I swapped computers (well motherboard, case and PSU) keeping the same HDD and CPU, I got some problems there, but it still installed fine just the registration was halted.

I sent Microsoft some emails, being vague as to what I did (didn't want them knowing I changed computers), and then if I can remember correctly I used the phone/online get code thing and it worked
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October 7, 2010 4:48:37 AM

As was stated the biggest difference is if you buy OEM - YOU are your own support as far as trouble shooting is concerned.

You can still get all the updates from MS. Patches, Security updates, even all the added programs - nothing is different there.

If the registry get's screwed up - you have to fix it, or find someone else to fix it, but if you call MS - they will more than likely charge you up front.

And for changing out any hardware, you can just use the dial up number and do the 4,857 digit number that you have to say into the phone and then they give you another 4,857 digit number to put back in the boxes and it's always worked for me. No other humans involved. I just did a complete "upgrade" - everything BUT the HD and GPU was replaced. One phone call - all set.

(OK - it's really only 48 digits long - 8 sets of 6 numbers....at least that's what mine has always been) ;-)
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October 8, 2010 4:44:16 AM

davewolfgang said:
As was stated the biggest difference is if you buy OEM - YOU are your own support as far as trouble shooting is concerned.

You can still get all the updates from MS. Patches, Security updates, even all the added programs - nothing is different there.

If the registry get's screwed up - you have to fix it, or find someone else to fix it, but if you call MS - they will more than likely charge you up front.

And for changing out any hardware, you can just use the dial up number and do the 4,857 digit number that you have to say into the phone and then they give you another 4,857 digit number to put back in the boxes and it's always worked for me. No other humans involved. I just did a complete "upgrade" - everything BUT the HD and GPU was replaced. One phone call - all set.

(OK - it's really only 48 digits long - 8 sets of 6 numbers....at least that's what mine has always been) ;-)


Exactly what i did, except I had to email them to find out I could do that
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November 16, 2010 1:02:57 PM

The Microsoft OEM System Builders License found <a href=”http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/p...”>here</a>, constitutes an agreement between the purchaser of an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) license and Microsoft. An excerpt from the above license:

“To distribute the Software or Hardware in this Pack, you must be a System Builder and accept this license. ’System Builder’ means an original equipment manufacturer, an assembler, a refurbisher, or a software pre-installer that sells the Customer System(s) to a third party.”

“If you comply with the terms of this license, Microsoft grants you a limited license to distribute the Software or Hardware. Except as granted in this license, you may not use, run, copy, modify, display, distribute, repackage or reassemble the Software, Hardware, OPK or any part of them.”

For information on the End User License Agreement (EULA) for any Microsoft product see <a href=”http://www.microsoft.com/About/Legal/EN/US/Intellectual...”>here</a>.

<a href=”http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/P...”>This FAQ</a> regarding Windows 7 OEM licensing provides details regarding hardware component replacement under the System Builder License category question “Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?” To paraphrase, hardware components of a computer can be upgraded or replaced with the exception of the motherboard, which can only be replaced if defective and if the replacement is identical or considered a direct replacement by the manufacturer.

Brandon
Windows Outreach Team- IT Pro
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