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Nikon Coolpix 5700 Lens Problems - Any changes?

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January 7, 2005 2:43:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm looking at purchasing a used Coolpix 5700 (about 10 mths old). The
price is right given the rebate Nikon is offering and the fact that the 5700
is near end of life. Googling both the web and newsgroups seems to bring up
a lot of negative comments regarding physical failure of the lens to
retract. But I've found relatively little recent comment. So my questions
are:

Are the later production models (say early 2003 mfg) having fewer problems?
Are the problems happening early in the camera's life and, if beyond that,
is the camera reliable?

I'm aware of some of the other issues with low light AF and flash; my big
concern (given no warrenty) is mechanical or electronic failure.

If you don't want to respond to the group, feel free to respond privately to
t296*****@comcast.net (removing asterisks). Thanks.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 8:23:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 11:43:08 -0600, in rec.photo.digital "HG"
<t296********@comcast.net> wrote:

>Are the later production models (say early 2003 mfg) having fewer problems?
>Are the problems happening early in the camera's life and, if beyond that,
>is the camera reliable?

I' add my comments to David's and Jerry's. I too believe a lot of these
problems were caused with the camera being inadvertently being switch on
while the lens was restrained in a bag. Switching the camera to playback
prevents the lens from extending if the camera is switched on. Mine's still
going just fine.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 8:59:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

HG wrote:
> I'm looking at purchasing a used Coolpix 5700 (about 10 mths old).
> The price is right given the rebate Nikon is offering and the fact
> that the 5700 is near end of life. Googling both the web and
> newsgroups seems to bring up a lot of negative comments regarding
> physical failure of the lens to retract. But I've found relatively
> little recent comment. So my questions are:
>
> Are the later production models (say early 2003 mfg) having fewer
> problems? Are the problems happening early in the camera's life and,
> if beyond that, is the camera reliable?
>
> I'm aware of some of the other issues with low light AF and flash; my
> big concern (given no warrenty) is mechanical or electronic failure.

I suspect that people learned to store the camera in Play mode rather than
Record mode! Then, if you accidentally flick the power switch when
handling the camera nothing untoward happens! (Otherwise, the lens can
jam against the case - it was extending when there was a mechanical limit
which was probably the problem you are referring to).

I haven't heard of any other widely-reported problems, except the flash
you mention.

By the way: there is a new newsgroup devoted to high-end SLR-like cameras
without interchangeable lenses at: rec.photo.digital.zlr You would be
welcome there.

Cheers,
David
Related resources
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 8:59:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

David J Taylor commented courteously ...

> I haven't heard of any other widely-reported problems,
> except the flash you mention.

I'm a very happy 5700 owner except that I got hit hard in
the forehead with a 2 x 4 with what I consider a defective
design for flash, whether the built-in speedlight or a
Nikon-compatible external flash. Nikon is useless in
resolving this, both Tech Support and Service.

I get such inconsistent exposures, that I frequently have
to put the camera in full manual mode and use the old-
fashioned flash guide number and distance to set the
camera.

--
ATM, aka Jerry
Anonymous
January 8, 2005 1:03:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

anyone4tennis@hotmail.com wrote:

> On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 11:43:08 -0600, in rec.photo.digital "HG"
> <t296********@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> Are the later production models (say early 2003 mfg) having fewer problems?
>> Are the problems happening early in the camera's life and, if beyond that,
>> is the camera reliable?
>
> I' add my comments to David's and Jerry's. I too believe a lot of these
> problems were caused with the camera being inadvertently being switch on
> while the lens was restrained in a bag. Switching the camera to playback
> prevents the lens from extending if the camera is switched on. Mine's still
> going just fine.


Nikon has reported that 'Lens Error' is a common problem in some coolpix
cameras especially the 3700
January 8, 2005 8:15:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <2cydnWtYSdyyV0PcRVn-rQ@comcast.com>, t296********@comcast.net
says...
>
>I'm looking at purchasing a used Coolpix 5700 (about 10 mths old). The
>price is right given the rebate Nikon is offering and the fact that the 5700
>is near end of life. Googling both the web and newsgroups seems to bring up
>a lot of negative comments regarding physical failure of the lens to
>retract. But I've found relatively little recent comment. So my questions
>are:
>
>Are the later production models (say early 2003 mfg) having fewer problems?
>Are the problems happening early in the camera's life and, if beyond that,
>is the camera reliable?
>
>I'm aware of some of the other issues with low light AF and flash; my big
>concern (given no warrenty) is mechanical or electronic failure.
>
>If you don't want to respond to the group, feel free to respond privately to
>t296*****@comcast.net (removing asterisks). Thanks.

I've had a 5700 since that model's release and have had 0 problems with the
lens. I've used it in some pretty inhospitible locations with high heat and
dust. It has served me well.

Low light focus is a problem, and it's too bad that the 5700 can not use the
IR focus on my SB-80DX. The newer (8800?) does offer IR focus, IIRC.

Back when I got that camera, I probably should have opted for the 5000/5400
for the wider angle lens, and wider angle supplemental, but that is history.
The camera has been recently relegated to p-n-s functions, with the purchase
of a D70, so the lens limitation is moot.

Based on my hard usage and its service to me, I'd recommend it handily.

Hunt
!