Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Motherboard swap without re-install of Windows 7

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
September 4, 2011 3:35:02 PM

I have looked high and low and cannot find an answer to this question, specific or otherwise! So here goes...

Can you change out your current motherboard running Windows 7 with the same manufacturer's board and branded chipset with the same platform (AMD or Intel) by installing generic or standard drivers in place of all branded chipset drivers, i.e., ATI, Intel, Nividia, etc., with the old motherboard in place, then make the replacement and not have to do a clean install of the OS after replacing the motherboard?

If you are familiar with what I am asking then you know that you would have to go into the Device Manager and uninstall any branded drivers; i.e., ATI, Intel, Nividia, etc. for the current installation and install generics or standards in their places, so on boot up after the motherboard replacement, Windows would not fall flat on it's face because the chipset drivers were different. Once you have finished with the driver replacements, shut it down, take the machine apart, make the motherboard replacement.

After you have made the replacement boot the machine and pray to the PC Gods that it works and it boots. If it does boot, install your new boards chipset drivers and vavoom. Done deal.

It just seems to me that if all the old branded chipset drivers were removed and replaced with standard generics before replacing the motherboard, then when the new motherboard is installed Windows would only see the standard generic drivers and there is no conflict created by Windows trying to use the old branded chipset drivers from the replaced board on the newly installed motherboard and Windows carries on as usual.

I know that it works for XP but as I previously stated; I cannot find any threads for Windows 7!? Just looking for some input, surely someone has tried or accomplished this already............

I do realize that backing up your system files prior to taking on this endeavor is not only necessary but mandatory as well.

I am going to try it. If it works, fine. If it doesn't work then a clean install will be in order..



September 4, 2011 4:01:18 PM

It is unlikely, but you can try it worst thing that happens is it wont boot properly.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
September 4, 2011 4:25:32 PM

So your question is, can I replace the motherboard with the exact same make and model without reinstalling Windows. I don't see why you can't.

However, one would think you would WANT to re-install. I reinstall 3-4 times a year just for the heck of it. Keeps things running clean and smooth.
m
0
l
Related resources
September 4, 2011 4:32:45 PM

It should work, and i see no need to reinstall either.
m
0
l
September 4, 2011 4:37:38 PM

If its the same exact brand/model than you wouldnt need to replace the drivers at all. Honestly i have not tried this but this is what i hear, so take it for what its worth.
m
0
l
September 4, 2011 5:02:49 PM

hermz1337 said:
If its the same exact brand/model than you wouldnt need to replace the drivers at all. Honestly i have not tried this but this is what i hear, so take it for what its worth.


It is the same brand board but different model and different chipset. I would be going from an AMD 780G to an AMD 880G chipset and DDR3 memory instead of DDR2.
m
0
l
September 4, 2011 5:04:57 PM

geekapproved said:
So your question is, can I replace the motherboard with the exact same make and model without reinstalling Windows. I don't see why you can't.

However, one would think you would WANT to re-install. I reinstall 3-4 times a year just for the heck of it. Keeps things running clean and smooth.


Make is the same but model is different. I would be going from an AMD 780G chipset to an AMD 880G chipset and from DDR2 memory to DDR3.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
September 4, 2011 6:35:24 PM

nopans said:
Make is the same but model is different. I would be going from an AMD 780G chipset to an AMD 880G chipset and from DDR2 memory to DDR3.

recommended procedure would be to do a clean install.
m
0
l

Best solution

a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
September 4, 2011 7:30:02 PM

Although the recommended procedure is a clean install I have found through much experience that Windows 7 is very good at coping with motherboard changes (much better than Windows XP where you nearly always have to reinstall) and that you very rarely have to reinstall when changing motherboards. Of greater concern is the fact that windows will become deactivated due to the maximum hardware changes limit being exceeded.
Share
September 4, 2011 8:27:33 PM

pjmelect said:
Although the recommended procedure is a clean install I have found through much experience that Windows 7 is very good at coping with motherboard changes (much better than Windows XP where you nearly always have to reinstall) and that you very rarely have to reinstall when changing motherboards. Of greater concern is the fact that windows will become deactivated due to the maximum hardware changes limit being exceeded.


Thanks for your response. I have been down that road with Microsoft before. Wanting to deactivate my OS because my HD crashed or previously changing my motherboard. Doesn't hold water. They are hard pressed to prove that your system didn't crash which is beyond your control in the first place; well, most of the time.

Unfortunately, electronics do not last forever and is something they will work with you on. Asking you to purchase a new key OS because you replaced the motherboard is like asking the owner of a new vehicle to pay the sales tax again just because he upgrade the exhaust system. Doesn't make sense.

You did not say but what is your take on the generic/standard driver swap of the branded drivers prior to changing the motherboard?

m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
September 5, 2011 12:14:35 AM

Quote:
You did not say but what is your take on the generic/standard driver swap of the branded drivers prior to changing the motherboard?


I don’t think that it would make any difference. Where the change of mother board may cause the operating system to have problems is in things like changing the SATA to IDE mode or from an Intel system to an AMD system.
m
0
l
September 9, 2011 8:48:00 PM

nopans said:
I have looked high and low and cannot find an answer to this question, specific or otherwise! So here goes...

Can you change out your current motherboard running Windows 7 with the same manufacturer's board and branded chipset with the same platform (AMD or Intel) by installing generic or standard drivers in place of all branded chipset drivers, i.e., ATI, Intel, Nividia, etc., with the old motherboard in place, then make the replacement and not have to do a clean install of the OS after replacing the motherboard?

If you are familiar with what I am asking then you know that you would have to go into the Device Manager and uninstall any branded drivers; i.e., ATI, Intel, Nividia, etc. for the current installation and install generics or standards in their places, so on boot up after the motherboard replacement, Windows would not fall flat on it's face because the chipset drivers were different. Once you have finished with the driver replacements, shut it down, take the machine apart, make the motherboard replacement.

After you have made the replacement boot the machine and pray to the PC Gods that it works and it boots. If it does boot, install your new boards chipset drivers and vavoom. Done deal.

It just seems to me that if all the old branded chipset drivers were removed and replaced with standard generics before replacing the motherboard, then when the new motherboard is installed Windows would only see the standard generic drivers and there is no conflict created by Windows trying to use the old branded chipset drivers from the replaced board on the newly installed motherboard and Windows carries on as usual.

I know that it works for XP but as I previously stated; I cannot find any threads for Windows 7!? Just looking for some input, surely someone has tried or accomplished this already............

I do realize that backing up your system files prior to taking on this endeavor is not only necessary but mandatory as well.

I am going to try it. If it works, fine. If it doesn't work then a clean install will be in order..








Well, its a done deal! I can attest to the fact that you can change out you motherboard while running Windows 7 and not have to re-install the OS. However, Microsoft did detect the hardware change and I had to re-activate Windows and was done using the online phone system to re-activate it and all went well.

I didn't even bother installing the generic/standard drivers in place of the branded drivers prior to swapping out the motherboard and it worked like a charm.

I did not install the exact same motherboard. I installed one made by the same manufacturer that was the same platform (AMD) but different Northbridge chipset.

After the initial boot, I had to restart and reconfigure the boot sequence in the BIOS and then Windows did the rest; found and installed all the necessary drivers.

The whole process took about 90 minutes and included the motherboard replacement.

m
0
l
September 10, 2011 4:39:07 PM

Best answer selected by nopans.
m
0
l
March 19, 2012 1:42:00 PM

nopans said:
Best answer selected by nopans.

n
nI have a similar situation and am going to try reuse existing win 7 image. We will see how it goes.
n
nJD
m
0
l
October 24, 2012 5:15:07 PM

Yes I realize me and the guy above me totally bumped this topic. But one thing I would like to add to people googling this and finding it in one simple answer is:

I took an old hard drive out of a 2004 Compaq Presario with Windows 7 on it, moved it over to my newer 2009 computer, and it still booted up Windows without a hitch. Didn't notice any problems.

Alright, you should probably close the thread now...
m
0
l
!