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Designating Bandwidth

Last response: in Networking
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May 6, 2010 9:26:54 AM

Hey Guys,
I am currently sharing a 16meg down/2 meg up connection with two other roommates. We were on an 8 meg service but after some having issues with lag (we're all gamers... and we stream movies with netflix) we decided to move up.

The problem is we still have issues.

When Im at my parents house, I can use a 5 meg connection to handle any game I want to play, or stream a movie fine, so my technologically challenged mind dictates that if I triple that speed, the 3 of us can all do our thing at the same time.

So far thats not the case... I can download a file at almost 2 mb/s or I can share the connection and we can both download 1 mb/s and so on, but if someones streaming a movie, your standard FPS becomes unplayable, because the movie wants all the bandwidth i suppose.

Well my question is: Is there any way to throttle the bandwidth so that we each get a third of the connection? Can I allocate 5 megs to 1 pc, 5 to the other and 6 to the third? because getting the same results regardless of an 8 or16 meg connection seems silly.

Thanks for the input

More about : designating bandwidth

May 6, 2010 2:57:13 PM

This is something that would happen at the router level. Most home routers probably do NOT support this, check the documentation on yours.
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May 7, 2010 5:47:02 PM

QoS (Quality of Service).

Typically setup by adding the ports for your games/etc to your router's QoS list.

What is your actual speed you get with your connection? I could play FPS games low latency even with my 16 down pegged and no QoS setup(I also have a 2/16 connection).

Pegging the upload is another story that requires QoS to stabilize the pings.

My ISP gives speed boost and my Netgear 3700 with QoS lets me play games with 15ms pings to Chicago (~350 miles away) and 2.5-3Mbit up and ~24mbit down via Bit Torrent. PowerBoost is *per stream* for me, so BitTorrent benefits a lot since you're constantly opening new TCP connections which then get bursted.
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