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Real-World benefit of Turbo mode?

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January 9, 2011 5:27:51 PM

We've all seen the benchmarks. We've all seen the overclocking tests. But we don't just run
benchmarks all day, do we?

Sometimes we only run one app but most of my time is spent running multiple apps. I have stock
charts, broker interface, instant messaging, email, programming environment, web browser etc all going
throughout the day.

The question is - how do I know what benefit Turbo mode is providing? The OS will schedule threads wherever it wants (by default) so it seems that there is no way to truly know when Turbo is kicking in and when it isn't.

The practical reason for the question is - should I be optimizing for base clock performance (since Turbo will rarely kick in) or should I accept a lower base clock and optimize for Turbo mode (assuming it's active most of the time)?

My instinct tells me I should forget about Turbo mode and just OC a fixed clock but I would appreciate any pointers for real-world results.

Thanks!
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January 9, 2011 6:14:50 PM

Bennet29 said:
The question is - how do I know what benefit Turbo mode is providing? The OS will schedule threads wherever it wants (by default) so it seems that there is no way to truly know when Turbo is kicking in and when it isn't.


Load and monitor CPUz.

Now if we are talking being able to set the highest OC in the BIOS, then I'd suggest using the OC Profiles tool such as the one in in the enthusiast boards from Asus. My son for example, has his 24/7/365 OC profile on his 920 at 3.78 GHz with all BIOS options at default (turbo on) and voltage at 1.125 ; core temps run in the high 50's.

Then he has others at 4.0 and 4.2 Ghz with it off that he boots to in gaming and other specific situations at higher voltages which hit 72C . Which profile is used is decided at boot time. Using one of these higher overclocked is something I'd recommend against in a 24/7/365 situation. No sense running CPU temps that high to run a word processor or browse the web.
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January 9, 2011 7:26:29 PM

I think I didn't explain myself clearly.

I'm trying to plan a cpu/mb upgrade. If turbo mode is actually being used it gives me one path to follow, and a different path if turbo is not being used.

With the apps I have running there will be many threads. The question is - do they all wind up on one or two cores which will allow turbo to kick in, or will they be divided across 4 cores so turbo will never kick in.

In other words, turbo does me no good if I have 16 threads spread among 4 cores.

I'm not understanding how this has to do with the particulars of which motherboard or how much ram. Either some cores are running at turbo clock or they aren't, yes?
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