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Asus P8P67-LE-V3 or Gigabyte P67A-UD3P-B3

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September 9, 2011 6:39:04 AM

Hi Community

I have decided to get a P67 Motherboard instead of a Z68 judging fro the feedback i got. I am stuck between getting the Asus P8P67-LE-V3 or the Gigabyte P67A-UD3P-B3. My computer shop does not sell H67 motherboards and only offers P61 or Z68 as alternatives. I will be using the computer for playing new Games such as Crysis 2, Black Ops, BFBC2 etc etc but no overclocking will be done whatsoever to it and i dont plan to in the long term.

The Specifications to my other PC parts are as followed

CPU: Intel i5 2500
Memory: 2x4GB Kit G.Skill Ripjaws-X DDR3-1600
HDD: WD Black SATA3 1TB
Graphics: ASUS Geforce GTX 580
Case: Coolermaster HAF 932
PSU: Corsair HX-750W
DVD: ASUS SATA DVDRW Burner

Best solution

September 9, 2011 7:16:29 AM

I have the exact same CPU and memory with a P8P67-LE-V3 so I can say at the very least, it's all compatible.

It's a good motherboard and I haven't overclocked either.
The only reason I got it (over the P8P67-M Pro which was the same price) was because it supports IDE but I doubt you'd need that feature.

One reason I'd recommend it over the Gigabyte board is because it has UEFI (graphical BIOS, looks nice =D). It's very easy to use and has mouse support, a major step over the traditional BIOS the Gigabyte board has.

Just comparing the two, the Asus one has one more SATA 6Gb/s connector.
I think the best thing to do is compare the specs of the two and choose the one with features you want.

I'd definitely recommend the P8P67 LE if you aren't overclocking. It's awesome =)

EDIT: If you plan on CrossFire, then take note that the second PCIE slot runs at x4 on BOTH motherboards and will not offer the best performance.
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September 9, 2011 7:34:32 AM

so if im goig to be CF/SLI i should get a Z68 instead of a P67?
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September 9, 2011 8:11:39 AM

Not necessarily. There are P67 boards which support CrossFire @ x16 and there are Z68 boards which don't.
You just need to look at the specs and find one that does.
This is what you are looking for:
2 x PCIe 2.0 x16 (single at x16 or dual at x8/x8 mode)
Something along those lines. You need to confirm that the board has a second PCIE slot which runs at x8 or x16.
This is all if you want the best performance with SLI. You definitely want to check if the board is SLI Compatible (it should have a badge somewhere on the page) cos otherwise it would be worthless buying it.
I'm not too familiar with SLI so do some research on its requirements if you do plan to do it.
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September 9, 2011 8:18:46 AM

AMD X6850 said:
Not necessarily. There are P67 boards which support CrossFire @ x16 and there are Z68 boards which don't.
You just need to look at the specs and find one that does.
This is what you are looking for:
2 x PCIe 2.0 x16 (single at x16 or dual at x8/x8 mode)
Something along those lines. You need to confirm that the board has a second PCIE slot which runs at x8 or x16.
This is all if you want the best performance with SLI. You definitely want to check if the board is SLI Compatible (it should have a badge somewhere on the page) cos otherwise it would be worthless buying it.
I'm not too familiar with SLI so do some research on its requirements if you do plan to do it.


Sorry if this is a weird question, I'm not familiar with motherboards, but are there any motherboards with dual x16?

I'm going to be doing crossfire 6950's on my build, and I'm looking at these Z68's, which one out of these is the best for dual gpus?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

I think me and the poster are asking basically the same thing.
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September 9, 2011 8:31:18 AM

There are no motherboards on that page which have dual PCIE x16 @x16 but you don't need it to be. Tom's had a benchmark recently and it found that PCIE x16 @x16 wasn't significantly better performing than PCIE x16 @x8 (which is much more common and heaps cheaper).
So you are better off sticking with Dual x8/x8.
Just to make sense of the numbers, the PCIE x16 means that the slot is physically that size and can fit x16 pcie cards (graphics cards for example).
The @x16 means that the slot electrically supports that much bandwidth (speed between pcie card and motherboard). So you can have a PCIE slot which is physically x16, but only runs at x4 electrically, limiting its speed (and performance in the case of graphics cards).

From that page, these motherboards are best for dual gpus (because they have dual x8/x8):
ASUS P8Z68-V - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASUS P8Z68-V PRO - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASUS P8Z68 Deluxe - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Next time it would be better to create a new thread because your question is different AND having its own thread would make it more visible on the main page (you'd get better/faster replies).

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September 9, 2011 8:40:43 AM

AMD X6850 said:
There are no motherboards on that page which have dual PCIE x16 @x16 but you don't need it to be. Tom's had a benchmark recently and it found that PCIE x16 @x16 wasn't significantly better performing than PCIE x16 @x8 (which is much more common and heaps cheaper).
So you are better off sticking with Dual x8/x8.
Just to make sense of the numbers, the PCIE x16 means that the slot is physically that size and can fit x16 pcie cards (graphics cards for example).
The @x16 means that the slot electrically supports that much bandwidth (speed between pcie card and motherboard). So you can have a PCIE slot which is physically x16, but only runs at x4 electrically, limiting its speed (and performance in the case of graphics cards).

From that page, these motherboards are best for dual gpus (because they have dual x8/x8):
ASUS P8Z68-V - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASUS P8Z68-V PRO - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASUS P8Z68 Deluxe - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Next time it would be better to create a new thread because your question is different AND having its own thread would make it more visible on the main page (you'd get better/faster replies).


I'm sorry, I did and I wasn't getting any replies. But I saw you actively replying to this thread here which was about the same topic
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September 9, 2011 11:37:13 PM

thanks for everyones help
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September 9, 2011 11:37:48 PM

Best answer selected by itsbighead.
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