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Setting up a small business network

Last response: in Networking
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May 7, 2010 7:40:37 PM

I got a call from a friend. He knows I am good with computers and his company wanted to pay me to build them 5 computers. I did that. Next thing I know they want me to do all of their computer related work in their office. They just built a new building and I am tasked with setting up the five computers, and the network that they all run on. Networking is my weakest point. I'm sure I can figure this stuff out but I'd like some advice.

Here are some of the details of the set up.

There are 6 computers. I built them. They are all running windows 7.

There are also two large copy machines that will need to be networked so that any of the six computers can print off them.

Ethernet cords are run from all of the individual offices into a closet. They are all dead ended into a sort of hub. I don't know what to call it exactly. But for every cord there is a ethernet port to plug into. So I take this as a fancy way to not just have a bunch of cords hanging there. I have a key that tells me what every single port/cord goes to.

They are using DSL. DSL plugs into a telephone jack next to this hub, and will go to a high speed modem.

Here's where it's confusing to me. At their old office they are using a D-link router of some sort. It has 8 numbered ports. All of their ethernet cords from before were haphazardly put in place and were all bundled up in the ceiling so I didn't have a clue as to which cord was for what. Which port goes to the modem to give internet access to all of them? How might I find out what goes where?

Also, the modem at the old office was on the other side of the building and none of the ethernet cords were labeled so I couldn't figure this out on my own or I would have. They believe that the guy that set the thing up for them in the first place intentionally made it difficult so that he would be the only one that got to work on it. Whatever.

So what I'm looking for, is on a D-link router like this, that doesn't have any in's and out's labeled, how do I go about figuring that stuff out? Also, what will I encounter when I go to network the two copy machines? And what kind of stuff do I need to understand to put it all together to get their network working properly.

Sorry for such a drawn out series of questions. Like I said they wanted me to build them some computers so I did. Next thing I know they want me to network their entire office together and set every single thing up computer wise. Some of this is a real stretch for me, but I'm up for the challenge. I would just appreciate if some of you guys with more experience with networking might be able to point me in the right direction. I believe I can learn anything necessary to set these guys up.

Thanks


*Cliffs* I have to set up a small business network and I don't understand an 8 port D-link router. If you know what I'm talking about please lend a hand.
May 8, 2010 7:05:04 AM

seefizzle said:



*Cliffs* I have to set up a small business network and I don't understand an 8 port D-link router. If you know what I'm talking about please lend a hand.



[#0005ff]That hub is probably a switch and you could, if they expand, have one of those for every one of the eight ports on the router. Keeping it simple but fairly quick so you can look impressive, cable the router to that switch and plug the cable you have to take out to make room for the router's cable straight into the router. Take all the other cables out of the switch (except the router input) and nip quickly round the computers and see which one is connected to the Internet. Add one cable at a time into the switch and label each one according to the computer it connects as you go along.

If that all goes smoothly and they can each connect to the Net, go ahead in each machine with whatever sharing they want to have. It might be a good idea to make the most senior person's computer the one with the direct router connection and give him or her open season on all the other machines while they can only have access to certain files on the other systems.

Post back for more if you succeed in getting that far.
[/#000ff]
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Anonymous
May 10, 2010 2:51:41 PM

Hi, I just came across this question and I too am not familiar with an 8 port D-link router. You state they are using Windows 7, but what kind of other software/hardware are they using? Is this a small business? You might find your answer on the Microsoft Small Business Center/Technical Support area, or this might be a question better suited to the Microsoft User Technical Support boards at microsoft.com. Here's the link if you want to check with the SMB Technical Support area first:

Microsoft Small Business Center/Technical Support:
http://bit.ly/dhaxi8

Good luck!
Cheers,
Rebecca
The Microsoft SMB Outreach Team
v-renewk@microsoft.com



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May 10, 2010 6:33:18 PM

Best practices would be all of the wires from each location in the office to run into a patch panel. If you do a google image search, let me know if it looks like one.

The DSL connection should have a modem where the telco line plugs in, and an ethernet connection. You can plug that ethernet connection straight into the WAN port of the D-link router. You then plug all other devices (PCs, printers) into LAN ports of the router.

The D-link will do basic DHCP assignments of IP addresses, and basic security. If they have the budget for a real firewall, and Windows Server, they will start being able to increase the functionality of the network (such as logon security, file shares, etc) but that starts getting a little more complicated.

Does that help any?
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May 11, 2010 6:31:24 AM

Quote:
Hi, I just came across this question and I too am not familiar with an 8 port D-link router. You state they are using Windows 7, but what kind of other software/hardware are they using? Is this a small business? You might find your answer on the Microsoft Small Business Center/Technical Support area, or this might be a question better suited to the Microsoft User Technical Support boards at microsoft.com. Here's the link if you want to check with the SMB Technical Support area first:

Microsoft Small Business Center/Technical Support:
http://bit.ly/dhaxi8

Good luck!
Cheers,
Rebecca
The Microsoft SMB Outreach Team
v-renewk@microsoft.com


[#0005ff]Hmmm - business getting slack over at M$ Forums then? It's a tad arrogant to think no-one here can answer this and other problems but somewhat comforting to see you folks come here to learn a thing or two to take back to Redmond. :D  [/#000ff]
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May 13, 2010 7:39:01 PM

What you are going to want to do is this:

Computers -> Switch -> Router -> DSL Modem

Between the Switch and Router you are going to need a CROSS OVER CABLE IF there is no "uplink" port on the switch. IF there IS a uplink port on the switch then a regular straight through cable WILL work.

Also on the router, there SHOULD be a port for an uplink to the "internet" this being where you would plug in your modem cable. Then there should be 4 or MORE ports for you to plug in network devices. This is where you would plug in your switch and other devices to further expand your network.

If you need more help with setting things up feel free to reply here or shoot me a message. I'll more than gladly lend a hand.
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