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Questions bout Sandy Bride and the 1555 socket...

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  • CPUs
  • Sandy Bridge
  • Socket
  • Product
Last response: in CPUs
January 13, 2011 4:30:26 PM

Hey everyone. So the sandy bridge processors came out and all, and I noticed they use a 1555 socket. Does this mean they need a whole new mobo socket? I'm pretty sure it does.

I was gonna ask what the Sandy Bridge alternative to the i5-750/760 would be. Also, is there any point of getting the Sandy Bridge? What real world performance increase is my friend gonna see if he decides to go with the SB CPU?

If it does need a new mobo, can anyone tell me a good mobo from ASUS that supports this socket and would be good for the i5-750 alternative?

What extra capabilties does the SB CPU give? Is it a no-brainer type of deal to not get anything but SB CPUs for future proofing or something?

I would like to get as much info as I can. Remember, I would like an i5-750/760 alternative (alternative as in performance/niche) around $200 or cheaper as long as the performance is the same and I would like a good ASUS motherboard that will support HDMI, at least 1 x15 PCI-E slot and all that good stuff necessary for a good upper mid end build (thinking a 6870)

NOTE: Please do not link me to 20 page articles and tell me to go learn on my own, I wanna learn from the community here in their own words, that's what forums are for

Thanks guys! The more info the better!

More about : questions bout sandy bride 1555 socket

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January 13, 2011 4:47:55 PM

Quote:
ey everyone. So the sandy bridge processors came out and all, and I noticed they use a 1555 socket. Does this mean they need a whole new mobo socket? I'm pretty sure it does.


Yep, new socket due to architecture changes.

Quote:
I was gonna ask what the Sandy Bridge alternative to the i5-750/760 would be. Also, is there any point of getting the Sandy Bridge? What real world performance increase is my friend gonna see if he decides to go with the SB CPU?


The equivalent to the i5-750 would be the i5 2500k. As for whether to go the SB route and performance increases, a good 20% increase in performance should be expected.

Quote:
If it does need a new mobo, can anyone tell me a good mobo from ASUS that supports this socket and would be good for the i5-750 alternative?


ASUS P8P67 Deluxe
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January 13, 2011 6:46:54 PM

I see. The 2500K is a bit pricy but the 2500 is only 210

The mobos too expensive I shoulda prob mentioned $150 max preferabbly $120-$130, we dont need crossfire just one x16 slot and yeah
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January 14, 2011 12:31:45 AM

My apologies thought it was 240. Thats a much more affordable mobo, whatld be the next step down and what would I be losing if I picked one step down? Ill get the 2500K for my friend although I thought you could OC any CPU..? I can OC an i5-750 can't I?
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January 14, 2011 3:02:12 AM

reaper2794 said:
My apologies thought it was 240. Thats a much more affordable mobo, whatld be the next step down and what would I be losing if I picked one step down? Ill get the 2500K for my friend although I thought you could OC any CPU..? I can OC an i5-750 can't I?

Intel has limited the overclocking ability (limited multiplier) for non-K parts when used with a P67 (and future X68). K parts can have the multiplier set up to 57 on a P67/X68 (not on a H67 mobo)... YMMV with OC results.
With the P67/X68, with many of the SB CPUs (I think it doesn't work for some of the i3s... check me on that) can be OC'd an extra 4 'steps'. I think it was 4 steps above the max turbo speed, but it might have been over the base speed.

The K parts also have the better integrated graphics, but if you're using a discrete card on a P67, you don't really care about that :) 
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January 14, 2011 10:12:42 AM

I see, so did this new limit come with the new SB processors because as far as Im aware the other processors before like the i5-750 allowed you to OC to however high the multiplier let you right?
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January 14, 2011 11:08:12 AM

Basically, the only way to overclock a SB CPU is to adjust the multiplier, which is locked on non-K parts.

Based on how well they seem to OC, makes sense though; if all the chips had the OC capacity the 2500/2600k has, Intel would have lost a lot of money if they hadn't locked down OCing.
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January 14, 2011 1:20:25 PM

Hmm I see /: The 2500K it is then
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January 14, 2011 3:58:28 PM

I just made the thread for the AMD btw XD 2500K is too expensive for his budget prob xD
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January 14, 2011 5:05:40 PM

If you have access to a MicroCenter, the 2500K is still on the website at $180, but I think its pick-up only. You can find H67 motherboards (several) below $100 and P67 boards below $130 (Asrock and Intel). The GIGABYTE GA-P67A-UD3 might be a good option at $130.

H67 used the built-in graphics (can add a GPU, but no Crossfire/SLI) and doesn't allow OC. P67 allows OC and has better multi-GPU support. That gets you closer to $300 for CPU/MB... otherwise, you're closer to $330. RAM can be had for roughly $10/GB after a rebate. If you're still not meeting budget and want Sandy Bridge, you'll have to wait until late February for the new i3s. They are generally not as good performance/cost... but they'll be about $100 for the CPU (losing turbo... often being dual core with Hyperthreading).
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