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Self shutdown and now will not power up at all

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October 20, 2010 10:10:30 AM

My freshly built computer worked fine for about two hours then it started shutting itself off. Now the system will not start up at all.

It definitely was not overheating, it seemed like specific things triggered it. For example, if I opened World of Warcraft (in windowed mode) and logged in, I was fine, but if I were to open a folder and that folder be overtop the game window, it would shut down. As long as they weren't in the same screen space it was fine. I was about to disable Aero to see if it was that but the system appears dead now.

I built the PC myself and checked it each step of the build process. Windows 7 installed perfectly fine, downloaded and installed some updates. Installed a few other applications (Google Chrome, Pidgin, iTunes, World of Warcraft) and then it kept shutting itself down only when World of Warcraft was open. After the fourth time it did not start up anymore.

Now when I start up the fans directly connected to the PSU turn on, but nothing else. My motherboard doesn't have any LED on it, but it makes no beeps at all and the CPU Fan does not start up.

I'm using a Thermaltake Armor case, with a Thermaltake Purepower-560APD (560W PSU) which are both 5 years old. The rest of the computer is all brand new within the last week.

CPU: Intel Core i5 760
Heatsink: Cool Master Hyper 212 Plus
Motherboard: ECS P55H-CM
RAM: 2x Patriot Sector 5 PGV34G1333ELK 2GB DDR3
Video Card: EVGA 512-P3-N987-TR GeForce 9800 GT
Harddrive: Seagate ST31000528AS Barracuda 7200.12
Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate

I have gone through every step of http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste... and am still dead in the water. Currently the only thing connected to the motherboard is the cpu, hsf and power supply. I have tested the PSU and it measures perfectly.

In my opinion my posible culprits are: a power surge, but I am behind a surge protector; a bad psu, but when tested seems to work perfectly; a bad motherboard or cpu, I find it odd that they would work for three hours, begin shutting itself down in the last hour, then just die completely.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

More about : shutdown power

a c 122 B Homebuilt system
October 20, 2010 12:51:37 PM

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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October 20, 2010 5:07:20 PM

jsc said:
Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

arzulia said:
I have gone through every step of http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste... and am still dead in the water. Currently the only thing connected to the motherboard is the cpu, hsf and power supply. I have tested the PSU and it measures perfectly.

I guess you didn't bother reading my entire post?

jsc said:
If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

Yes this was in the link I already went through, same results. This is also what I meant by "Currently the only thing connected to the motherboard is the cpu, hsf and power supply" but I see now I should have explicitly said not in a case.

jsc said:
If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

This was also in the link I already went through. I do not have access to another PSU but I swapped it in to another system with no problems, I connected it to a PSU tester and I checked each and every wire coming out of it with my multimeter.

jsc said:
If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.

It does not beep at all. :( 
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