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Snady bridge limitations

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January 14, 2011 7:08:41 AM

So like a lot of people I got excited about the Sandy Bridge at first but then the realization that the Sandy Bridge is a 1155 socket aka no triple channel support. Has anybody heard if the Ivy Bridge will be the same way or will it support triple channel? Any other drawbacks of the Sandy Bridge?
January 14, 2011 7:09:40 AM

Sorry. The title should be Sandy Bridge.
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a c 311 à CPUs
January 14, 2011 2:42:04 PM

1) Sandy bridge memory capability is not an issue. The integrated ram controller can keep the cpu fed with data from even the slowest ram.
2) ivy bridge is the 22nm die shrink, due out next year.
3) The follow on to 1366 later this year will be for servers and high end workstations. It will have quad channel ram capability and 6 or 8 core capability using the current sandy bridge architectual improvements.
4) Some have complained about wasting the integrated graphics on a gaming rig with a discrete card. True, to some extent, but I think it was cheaper for Intel to build just one all purpose chip, and disable parts than to build two different chips. It really is not an issue.
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January 14, 2011 3:26:55 PM

I keep hearing that memory is a severe bottleneck to the Sandybridge boards, due to be remedied by DDR4 next year(or maybe late this year)along with the introduction of Ivy Bridge.
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a c 311 à CPUs
January 14, 2011 3:53:43 PM

stingstang said:
I keep hearing that memory is a severe bottleneck to the Sandybridge boards, due to be remedied by DDR4 next year(or maybe late this year)along with the introduction of Ivy Bridge.


Can you reference some benchmarks that demonstrate that supposed bottleneck?
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January 14, 2011 5:14:34 PM

There is no memory bottleneck.
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a c 311 à CPUs
January 14, 2011 5:41:35 PM

Quote:
He doesn't need too. Whatever he read is bullshit. There's no bottleneck.


I know, but I always try to be nice.
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