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How would I set up two Kingston HyperX 3k's in raid

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January 29, 2013 11:39:59 AM

Hi guys I'm building a new computer with a AsRock Z77 Extreme4, Intel Core i5 3570k, MSI TFIII 7950 Boost Edition, and Seasonic 620 Watt Bronze power supply as the main components. So I am going to be buying two Kingston HyperX 3k 120GB's this weekend and I want to set them up in, umm... a RAID 0 configuration. Is that what its called? I am going to be installing Windows 7 64bit on the SSD and I am wondering how I would initiate the drives being put in RAID 0 when I first start up the computer. I have never put together a computer before and I'm going to microcenter on saturday to pick up the rest of the stuff. Also, I was going to buy some DDR3-1600 memory, but the microcenter nearest to me doesn't have any that is under the supported memory on my MOBO. Is DDR3-1866 a step up? Because I have found some 1866 that is in stock so I am probably just going to pick that up so I don't have to wait for memory to ship to my house.
January 29, 2013 11:56:08 AM

When you boot up your pc keep hitting Del button on your keyboard to be taken into your BIOS or F10 or whatever the key is for your BIOS.

There you can set it to RAID, ACHI etc that is if your motherboard supports it.
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January 29, 2013 12:00:12 PM

Is there anything special I have to do? I can't seem to find a tutorial anywhere for setting up SSD's in RAID 0.
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January 29, 2013 12:06:18 PM

My understanding is that before you install Windows 7, you need to first make sure that you configure your SATA as RAID. I've found this guide that might help you.

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/how_set_light...

The ASRock supports duel channel:

DDR3 - 1066
DDR3 - 1333
DDR3 - 1600
DDR3 - 1866(OC)
DDR3 - 2133(OC)
DDR3 - 2400(OC)
DDR3 - 2800(OC)

Hope this helps
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January 29, 2013 12:50:20 PM

Thanks a lot! (: does a higher number ddr3 represent faster RAM?
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January 29, 2013 1:00:49 PM

I actually just found this on microcenter and it is under the supported RAM list on the AsRock Z77 Extreme4 page.
http://www.microcenter.com/product/360528/HyperX_blu_12...(PC3-12800)_CL9_Triple_Channel_Desktop_Memory_Kit_(Three_4GB_Memory_Modules)

It is (3 x 4gb) Is the going to be a problem just putting in 3 sticks of RAM? I might have heard somewhere that yo should only put RAM in pairs. Is that true? They are also 1.65 volts so is that going to be a problem?? I have had people tell me to only buy 1.5v but te memory is definetly supported so it will be fine, right?

Also would you guys recommend buying two 120gb SSD's or one 240gb?
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Best solution

a b G Storage
January 29, 2013 1:24:36 PM

I would recommend using a SSD drive that would be between 50 and 75% full when your OS and programs are installed on it. RAID setups tend to create headaches...

Use hard drives for data and file storage.
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January 29, 2013 1:33:58 PM

As long as this RAM is supported by the board it will run fine.

The board will just run the ram as single channel instead of tri or dual channel ram.

As for the voltage, I wouldn't worry about that.

I've just made a post about setting up 2 SSD's in RAID but it seems that there is no real point for a home system - if you are just going to use the SSD for OS, Applications and games then go for the bigger SSD.
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January 29, 2013 1:35:22 PM

...and like RoninTexas said, just use a HDD for data and file storage
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January 29, 2013 2:45:38 PM

Why would the RAM only run single channel if it is supported? and why should I fil my SSD up to 50% or 75%? Is that because of the cache? It runs faster when filled?
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a b G Storage
January 29, 2013 3:17:37 PM

The 50%-75% filled is just an example of utilization. You can buy the largest drive available if you want. You should always have a bit of breather room, just in case you buy new programs. You also need free space for updates, log files, temp files, etc...

SSD's are expensive storage - but the speed differential as compared to a hard drive is huge. Buying too large of a drive is a waste of money - in my opinion.
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January 29, 2013 7:56:20 PM

This is the basic run down of RAM set-ups:

Use 4 dimms on a quad channel board...run in quad channel
Use 3 dimms on a quad channel board...run in single channel
Use 2 dimms on a quad channel board...run in dual channel
Use 1 dimms on a quad channel board...run in single channel

Use 3 dimms on a triple channel board...run in triple channel
Use 2 dimms on a triple channel board...run in single channel
Use 1 dimms on a triple channel board...run in single channel

Use 4 dimms on a dual channel board...run in dual channel
Use 3 dimms on a dual channel board...run in single channel
Use 2 dimms on a dual channel board...run in dual channel
Use 1 dimms on a dual channel board...run in single channel

(http://www.overclock.net/t/1293492/dual-vs-quad-channel...)
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February 8, 2013 6:05:46 AM

Best answer selected by ravagetheearth.
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February 8, 2013 6:06:56 AM

BTW I did set up my system in raid and there is no problems so far. You were very helpful though and I do have the raid setup 60% full. Aprreciate it!
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February 16, 2013 7:25:33 AM

ravagetheearth said:
Hi guys I'm building a new computer with a AsRock Z77 Extreme4, Intel Core i5 3570k, MSI TFIII 7950 Boost Edition, and Seasonic 620 Watt Bronze power supply as the main components. So I am going to be buying two Kingston HyperX 3k 120GB's this weekend and I want to set them up in, umm... a RAID 0 configuration. Is that what its called? I am going to be installing Windows 7 64bit on the SSD and I am wondering how I would initiate the drives being put in RAID 0 when I first start up the computer. I have never put together a computer before and I'm going to microcenter on saturday to pick up the rest of the stuff. Also, I was going to buy some DDR3-1600 memory, but the microcenter nearest to me doesn't have any that is under the supported memory on my MOBO. Is DDR3-1866 a step up? Because I have found some 1866 that is in stock so I am probably just going to pick that up so I don't have to wait for memory to ship to my house.



I had an Intel Series 320 80GB SSD that I used in my AMD C-50 1GHz Netbook running Windows 7 with 4GB DDR3 RAM, SSD is not faster than my original 250GB 5400RPM HDD that came with the Netbook. The only advantage would be it produce less heat for the NetBook to dissipate out of the case so it won't burn my hand holding it. After the Intel had a bios problem, (when my Netbook battery was low and A.C. Charger not connected to the Netbook), my Intel Series 320 80GB SSD became 8MB and cannot be fixed with Intel's format software. The SSD is still waiting to be replaced for the 3 year warranty that Intel will honur their SSD products.

While I was waiting for the Intel Series 80GB SSD to be replaced, I purchased a new Kingston HX 3K 240GB SSD to use in my Netbook,
It ran faster than the Intel Series 320 80GB SSD, and also boot Windows 8 faster than the original 250GB 5400RPM HDD with Windows 7 Ultimate. However the new 3K Kingston SSD do not last more than 2 months with random use, then it is no longer working any more. I had another note-book MacBook Air 13" 128GB Flash 4GB DDR3 running Mac OS.x and Windows 8 Professional that I use at the same time I bought the Kingston HX 3K 240GB SSD, thus the new Kingston SSD was not used most of the time and died.
I am still looking for a better make SSD to replace the 2 SSD I bought recently for $500.00.

I still trust my 320 GB WD Black 7200RPM 2.5 inches HDD and 500GB WD Black 7200RPM 3.5 inches HDD to store my data until some manufacturer makes a good reliable SSD in the future.

Believe me you will save a lot of $$$ not going for SSD so soon.

Check out
For Reference, SSD Versus HDD: Power And Performance
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-recommendation-...
If you still want your SSD so soon.
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