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Real Water Cooling Made Easier

Last response: in Systems
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October 21, 2010 7:55:59 AM

We don't talk much about real water cooling in the New Build section, for good reason.

Real water cooling is best left to experienced builders who have done a lot of homework. It will literally add days to a build if done right, as it must be tested carefully for leaks before being allowed near your expensive hardware.

Yes, there are smaller fully enclosed liquid cooling solutions for the CPU, but these at best compete with air cooling, never fully beating air coolers for performance.

Real water cooling, at least up to now, has involved careful parts research and selection. Radiator, hose, CPU waterblock, pump, reservoir, fittings, and more all cost a good bit and all have to work together. The benefits are reduced noise and improved cooling. And of course it looks cool.


Recently one of the major players in water cooling, Swiftech, quietly announced a new part. They took three of the most important parts and combined them into one. The MCR X20 Drive Rev2 series has a quality radiator that will serve as a reservoir with a pump built right into it.
Swiftech MCR X20 Drive Rev2

This took much of the work out of constructing a water cooling setup. Why? Well, before you had to connect those three separate items with hoses and fittings. Now you do not. This eliminates time, planning and potential leaks.

What really caught my interest though was the full kit Swiftech has assembled. This is all the parts you need to get started cooling any modern CPU.

While I do not have any numbers for you at this time, I can tell you from the design that either of these kits, with proper installation, ought to beat any air cooler easily. The catch? Price of course.

The lowest I have found for the smaller kit is $248.99 before shipping.

The folks at Frozen CPU have even assembled a list of cases that will fit the kit internally:
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/11704/ex-wat-157/Swif...

There's still extra work to installing and maintaining a high-quality water cooling system, and this kit is not for everyone. However, I can report that the hard-core water crowd has nothing but praise for this new trend. High-end computer builds should now at least consider this option, at least for the CPU cooling.

Tell me what you think.
October 21, 2010 10:30:19 AM

I am digging the dual radiator set up of the Swiftech unit. If I were more of an overclocker, I'd surely go for a water cooled kit like the Swiftech unit, but at this point, I really don't need to OC.
October 21, 2010 12:14:00 PM

Face approves.
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October 21, 2010 2:34:23 PM

buwish said:
I am digging the dual radiator set up of the Swiftech unit. If I were more of an overclocker, I'd surely go for a water cooled kit like the Swiftech unit, but at this point, I really don't need to OC.

^+100%

I've thought about going water cooling but with me just sticking with minor overclocks (i7-920 @ 3.4GHz) it just never made sense. At one time I thought... cool I'll get the H50 since it is water cooling but I quickly realized that wasn't the best option :)  :lol:  . If I ever decide (or asked to build with WC - so far never requested), I will definitely keep this system in my mind.

Thanks for sharing Proximon!!
October 21, 2010 7:14:36 PM

While my own setup is more modular and expandable, some of the parts are quite similar. I think for me it's a bit of everything. Temps are better, and I can have confidence that my CPU cooling is well covered whatever I want to do. It's quieter than air because I can use low speed fans everywhere, and I like the way it looks.
October 26, 2010 11:45:19 PM

The Swiftech stuff is quality.

I have 3 water cooling kits - two thermaltake Aquarious systems and a Gigabyte Galaxy.

These are at best equal to a decent air cooler.

A very popular pump is the Swiftech MPC655 which is a 1200LPH pump.

The integrated unit you have previewed has a 1050 LPH pump which isn't much smaller though.

It looks like a decent system.



October 27, 2010 8:08:13 AM

I wish someone would standardize water blocks into 4 or 5 sizes, and then be able to attach to mounting points. I'd love to water cool, but I don't want to have to buy a new water block every time I change a component, and I don't trust brackets to work well enough.
October 27, 2010 9:40:56 AM

Yes I would Love to water cool but most the time I think about trying to add it into the overall cost of the build, I see air cooling being able to do the job fine. Don't get me wrong I do see a lot of benefits from water cooling but to my needs it just don't tip the scale when it comes to the extra cost.
October 27, 2010 3:44:42 PM

Having built many PCs using *real* WCing and owning many Swiftech stuff (ie. GTZ, 655,etc) I approve of this. Well done Prox.

The only concerns I have for the 220 kit:
1. Rad is a bit too small depending on heat load. You want a 360 rad if running a i7 920/X6 and planning to OC to the max. Else the 220 is fine.

2. That pump is damn new. Skeenee doesn't have a review on that pump yet. I 'll wait and see how it really performs before recommending it.

Quote:
The integrated unit you have previewed has a 1050 LPH pump which isn't much smaller though.

Yes, but that is still more than enough GPM/LPM for pretty much any system.
October 27, 2010 3:47:58 PM

etk said:
I wish someone would standardize water blocks into 4 or 5 sizes, and then be able to attach to mounting points. I'd love to water cool, but I don't want to have to buy a new water block every time I change a component, and I don't trust brackets to work well enough.

This is a non-issue. I'm running my GTZ on the LGA1366, the block came with the LGA775 brackets. I just had to buy the 1366 kit for like $5-7. That block is pretty old but still works. The ONLY case where you will need to completely buy a new block is if you are replacing full cover GPU blocks as they won't work between different generations. (ie. A 4850 full cover will not work with a GTX480/6870,etc).
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