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Building rig around GeForce GTX 465

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September 15, 2011 6:49:39 PM

I'm rebuilding my 2006 rig to accommodate some of the newer games coming out... Skyrim, Diablo III, and perhaps play some current games at higher detail (like Mafia II with physics turned on). Not sure if that's possible without SLI, but it's not critical as I'm doing this on a budget.

So, for a budget of $500-600, I'd need to buy:

1) Motherboard
2) CPU
3) RAM (I have Windows 7 64-bit, so perhaps 8gb+ ram)

I currently have a self-built rig, Asus P5B mobo, Intel Core2Duo e6600, and 4gb Corsair ram, ATX case, Antec 650w PSU. My HDD is 512gb SATA 3 and I have an unused 1tb SATA 3... (should I buy a SATA 6? Is there a significant difference?)

Also, I'd like to build this with an eye towards future expansion. I want to keep this PC alive with relatively inexpensive upgrades for as long as I've kept my current one... since 2006.

So, if this were your rig and your $500, what would you build? I do have a preference for Asus, Corsair and Intel.

Thanks guys
a b V Motherboard
September 15, 2011 7:35:43 PM

If you'r not in a hurry to upgrade, I'd wait a few weeks and see what bulldozer has to offer(benchmarks).

But if you're itching too much for an upgrade I'd go something like this:

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
MOBO: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
RAM: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It'd be a VERY nice upgrade from what you have.

and keep everything else the same
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September 15, 2011 7:45:46 PM

Thanks very much for the input.

Even though I've been building my rigs for over 10 years, I do it very infrequently and so each time I do my research for a rebuilt, I feel like a total noob.

I'm not an overclocker, so I was debating whether it was worth going with one of the i7s over the i5s.

And just out of curiosity why the rec for a micro atx mobo? I'm not familiar with Biostar as I've always been an Asus/MSI full atx kind of a guy.

Oh, and for clarity my PSU is 650w, not 750 as I originally posted. I've edited my original post.

Thanks!
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 15, 2011 9:37:49 PM

I just upgraded a system using the following three components about a month and a half ago:

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K for $219.99
Mobo: ASUS P8Z68-V Pro for $199.99
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 8GB DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) low profile heat spreader CML8GX3M2A1600C9B for $52.99

Total: $472.97

I haven't encountered any problems with it yet.

It was easily overclocked to 4.8 GHz.

The only SATA3 6Gb/s device I have is a Corsair Force Series 3 SSD used as the primary boot disk.

I doubt that you will notice any difference between a SATA2 (3 Gb/s) HDD and a SATA3 (6 Gb/s) HDD because the SATA interface isn't the limiting factor.
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a b V Motherboard
September 15, 2011 10:41:26 PM

expensive mobo is totally not necessary unless you plan to crossfire /sli more than 2 cards and can withstand annoying microstuttering.

Also 1333 cas7 is faster than 1600 cas9 memory, and anything above 1600 is just not worth the cost due to low performance improvements ( eg. those 2300mhz superultramegauberdragonoverclock versions with an extra cooler just for the mem).

I've had 4 biostar mobo'sover the years and never encountered a single problem with them, plus the one I chose has a 5-star rating
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September 16, 2011 6:59:02 PM

OK, I took the plunge and purchased these three components on your recommendations. The price was certainly right... I was planning to spend $500-600 and only had to pay $350.

I see that the i5/2500K is an open core, ready for overclocking... I've always been extremely wary of overclocking (in fact, I've never done it) I wonder what you could safely recommend I overclock to. Also, could you recommend a good "overclocking for dummies" tutorial? I might be ready to cautiously stick my big toe in the overclockers pool.

EDIT: Answering my own question here. This one seems like a great Sandy Bridge overclocking guide

http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclocking/39184-p67-s...

Thanks

wiinippongamer said:
expensive mobo is totally not necessary unless you plan to crossfire /sli more than 2 cards and can withstand annoying microstuttering.

Also 1333 cas7 is faster than 1600 cas9 memory, and anything above 1600 is just not worth the cost due to low performance improvements ( eg. those 2300mhz superultramegauberdragonoverclock versions with an extra cooler just for the mem).

I've had 4 biostar mobo'sover the years and never encountered a single problem with them, plus the one I chose has a 5-star rating

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a b V Motherboard
September 16, 2011 8:44:44 PM

Let me know how the build went!

I consider a safe OC anything that you don't have to mess with voltages and if you have a decent cooler to keep it whithin safe limits, you'll need a good cooler if you want to keep things cool, this will serve well : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..., best bang for buck around, add a second fan and it'll drop another 3-4c http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also make sure you have a case with good airflow, the gtx465 is already a pretty "hot" card.

OCing the 2500k is extremely easy, just raise the multiplier and test for stability, alot of people OC to 4-4.2ghz, even 4.4ghz without any extra voltage, after you do that boot into windows and download prime95 and make a blend test for a few hours, some people say 6, 12 or even 24 but that's unnecessary, or small ftt test is good too.

If it crashes, doesn't boot, etc don't panic as long as you keep it cool AND you're not using too much voltage it won't harm anything.
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September 16, 2011 8:58:01 PM

wiinippongamer said:
Let me know how the build went!

I consider a safe OC anything that you don't have to mess with voltages and if you have a decent cooler to keep it whithin safe limits, you'll need a good cooler if you want to keep things cool, this will serve well : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168..., best bang for buck around, add a second fan and it'll drop another 3-4c http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also make sure you have a case with good airflow, the gtx465 is already a pretty "hot" card.

OCing the 2500k is extremely easy, just raise the multiplier and test for stability, alot of people OC to 4-4.2ghz, even 4.4ghz without any extra voltage, after you do that boot into windows and download prime95 and make a blend test for a few hours, some people say 6, 12 or even 24 but that's unnecessary, or small ftt test is good too.

If it crashes, doesn't boot, etc don't panic as long as you keep it cool AND you're not using too much voltage it won't harm anything.


OK, one additional question. I found a review on Amazon which says this about the Biostar board you recommended:

NO OC with H67 Chipset
Please make sure to purchase a P67 based motherboard if you want to change the multiplier!
The H67 chipset is not able to overclock the processor, only the integrated GPU."

Is this true? The Biostar board uses H67 architecture. Bear in mind, if I choose to overclock, I will likely be doing it only to 4.0ghz. (It seems a shame to invest in an unlocked cpu and not take advantage of it)

Also, the motherboard comes with the Biostar T-Overclocker utility, so that reviewer's opinion seems to have less and less merit. But is there something to what he says? And since you have experience using Biostar boards, have you used the T-Overclocker utility versus going through the overclocking procedure outlined in the link I provided above?

And as for my case, I have a Cooler Master Centurion 5

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Thanks again for your help.
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 16, 2011 9:14:38 PM

Intel never targeted the H67 chipset for the enthusiasts/overclocker crowd. The H67 is a mainstream chipset meant for the non-K suffix Sandy Bridge CPUs. You will see the H67 used in consumer desktops like Acer, Dell, HP, etc., because the BIOS is locked anyways and prevents overclocking so there is no need for an overclocking capable chipset.

If you intend on attempting overclocking of a K-suffixed Sandy Bridge CPU then the choice is the P67 or Z68 chipset motherboards.
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September 16, 2011 9:28:08 PM

ko888 said:
Intel never targeted the H67 chipset for the enthusiasts/overclocker crowd. The H67 is a mainstream chipset meant for the non-K suffix Sandy Bridge CPUs. You will see the H67 used in consumer desktops like Acer, Dell, HP, etc., because the BIOS is locked anyways and prevents overclocking so there is no need for an overclocking capable chipset.

If you intend on attempting overclocking of a K-suffixed Sandy Bridge CPU then the choice is the P67 or Z68 chipset motherboards.


I understand what you're saying.

But if this is the case, and it is not possible to overclock the H67, then why is overclocking utility software included in the with the card? Or is the website incorrect? What would happen if I attempted to use the T-Overclocking software with it's intended H67 mobo on my Sandy Bridge K?

http://www.biostar.com.tw/app/en/mb/introduction.php?S_...
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a b V Motherboard
September 16, 2011 9:44:43 PM

oops, I'm a noob at intel stuff, been using AMD since P3 days.

This mobo should be good then. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The reason I'm using AMD is Intel being so cheaty to their customers and changing sockets every 6 months is a slap to the face :pfff: 

Also NEVER use software for OCing CPU, use BIOS always.
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September 24, 2011 5:44:21 AM

Hi guys, op here, writing from my Wii because I am mid-build on my pc.

Some thoughts since my last build in Aug 2006:

1. Where'd the IDE ports go? Can't install Windows without an optical drive. Stuck until tomorrow!

2. Backplate for Cooler Master 212+ attaches to motherboard, not to back of case.

3. How do I know if the second fan I attached to my heatsink is going to spin in a complimentary direction with the stock fan?

4. Antec Earthwatts 650... not enough plugs. I can either power the secondary port on my 465 card, or power both the ATXPWR 2 or 3 on my motherboard. (The mobo manual recommends plugging both ATX 2 & 3 when overclocking for power stability. Aside from buying a new power supply with more plugs, is there a workaround for this?

Thanks!
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a b V Motherboard
September 24, 2011 6:16:04 AM

DO NOT BUY NEW PSU JUST YET.

With ATXPWR I think you mean the 24-pin mobo connector and the 8-pin CPU power connector right? Did you get Z68 or H67?

The GTX465 only needs two 6-pin PCIE power connectors Which the earthwatt has. I don't get what you mean by not enough connectors, If you need more connectors for your card you can always buy a molex to PCIE connector http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And yes, the hyper 212+ backplate ataches to mother if that's what you're asking.

On the fan config, it's supposed to be a push/pull config, one fan takes air from your case and pushes it through the heatsink, and the other would be directed towards the back of the case to the exhaust fan
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 24, 2011 6:23:57 AM

1. Where'd the IDE ports go? Can't install Windows without an optical drive. Stuck until tomorrow!

The IDE (a.k.a. PATA) port has been obsoleted. I had to buy a SATA optical drive when I upgraded from an LGA775 motherboard with PATA to my current P8Z68-V PRO with no PATA.

You can also create a bootable Windows USB flash drive and use that to install Windows instead of using an optical drive.

2. Backplate for Cooler Master 212+ attaches to motherboard, not to back of case.

This is normal.

3. How do I know if the second fan I attached to my heatsink is going to spin in a complimentary direction with the stock fan?

There should be arrows on the fan's frame indicating direction of fan blade rotation and air flow direction. Make sure both fans are facing the same air flow direction. One fan should push air into the cooling fins and the other fan should pull the air out.

4. Antec Earthwatts 650... not enough plugs. I can either power the secondary port on my 465 card, or power both the ATXPWR 2 or 3 on my motherboard. (The mobo manual recommends plugging both ATX 2 & 3 when overclocking for power stability. Aside from buying a new power supply with more plugs, is there a workaround for this?

When I look at the list of connectors for the Antec EA 650 - EC or the Antec EA-650 Green they both have enough of the correct connectors.

Which motherboard make and model did you finally buy?
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September 24, 2011 6:52:32 AM

I wound up buying the Biostar TP67XE referenced earlier.

Re the PSU, mine is Antec EA-650. On the mobo, in addition to the 24-pin plug, there are two add'l 8-pin ATX connectors perpindicular to each other in the upper left corner of the board. I do have an adapter to create another 6-pin connector. Additionally, there's a little 2-pin stub hanging out near the 6-pin PCI-E bundle (attached to it with a label which says "8-pin PCI-E" although my card is powered by two 6-pin plugs, not 8). And I do have a dangling 4-pin avail as well.

The thing is, I am not knowledgable enough about PSUs to know if the PCI-E plugs or the dangling 4-pin can be used for the secondary 8-pin ATX power port.
The mobo manual attempts to clarify, but confuses matters. There is a diagram in which the 8-pin adapter pins are numbered in a horseshoe shape, so numbers one and eight are next to each other (counts up one side then down the other).

The manual says:

"These connectors provide +12V to CPU power circuit. If the CPU plug is 4-pin, please plug it in to Pin 1-2-5-6".

This makes no sense, because the dangling 4-pin adapter I mentioned before is a square shape, and based on the horseshoe pattern of numbring 1-2-5-6 is not a square.

Confused yet? ;) 
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 24, 2011 8:38:50 AM

It looks like a typical BIOSTAR cost cutting shortcut method to supply more power to the CPU VRM circuit when overclocking the CPU.

Any decent high quality motherboard has only a single 8-pin ATX 12V Power connector because the power plane traces are more robust.

If you don't plan on overclocking the CPU you can just connect one of 8-pin ATX 12V Power connectors to the power supply.

If you are planning to overclock your CPU then you'll have to look for a 2 x 4pin Molex to 8pin EPS 12V Adapter cable.
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a b V Motherboard
September 24, 2011 5:59:29 PM

First of all DO NOT PLUG THE PCIE CONNECTOR INTO THE ATX THING.

That is the first mobo I've ever seen that asks you connect 2 cpu power cables for any reason, but oh well: http://www.directron.com/ad202.html

The PSU has the 2 pin thingy aside the 6-pin connector because some graphics cards require 8-pin connectors

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September 24, 2011 11:35:29 PM

Well, that adapter cable is proving very difficult to find. The closest I've heard of is a 1 molex which I could split. Could I adapt the 4pin atx to an 8.pin? Might have more luck with that
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September 26, 2011 4:58:51 PM

Writing to you now from my newly built PC.

Well, everything went quite well, considering. It powered on the very first time, which is truly cause for celebration.

Here are a few problems I had:

- It turns out the 2xmolex to 8pin atx wasn't necessary (I couldn't find it locally anyway). The 4-pin I referred to before fit into pins 1-2-5-6 (the manual illustration was wrong) of the 2nd 8-pin ATX. However, I did find a 12v 4 pin to 8 pin ATX adapter, which I purchased just in case. Turns out, I didn't need it. And my fears about plugging in the wrong connectors was unfounded. The PCI-E plugs (which require different power settings) are "keyed" differently... in other words, the plastic molding around each of the 8-pins are different for PCI-E and the mobo, and so you'd have to force it. Computer building has become rather idiot-proof thee days.

- I mistakenly tried to install my upgrade version of windows on my new 1TB HDD and that didn't work at all. That meant I had to go back in and plug in my old 500gb HDD (which I had backed up and didn't plan to use), which led to the following frustration:

- Why, oh WHY are the SATA connectors not oriented straight up? They're aligned to the front of the case, right behind where the HDDs are parked, so it makes plugging in the SATA cable unnecessarily difficult. If I had known this beforehand, I would have plugged in the HDDs before, but it wouldn't have fixed my Windows install problem (see further down).

- I said goodbye to my old DVD burner and decided to but a new lightscribe 24x DVD-R. It's nice to have a DVD burner whose face matches the color of my case.

But really, that was it. Once Windows was installed, driver software installed and all updates downloaded, the thing worked perfectly. In fact, once I completed the Windows Easy Transfer, it was rather surprising how little things appeared to change.

That is, until I reinstalled Mafia 2 and cranked up all the detail and PhysX settings.

Holy cow, what a difference. I tried cranking the settings on my old machine and it absolutely choked. FPS went down to 3-4. With PhysX off, it ran great-- about 40fps. Now with all settings cranked (including PhysX) I'm experiencing 40fps! PhysX off, it's up to 56fps. (Mind you, this is withing having overclocked anything yet). My CPU temp is averaging 38c (I've seen it go up as high as 42c). The mobo comes with a really handy piece of software called "Green Power Utility" in which you can monitor all critical core functions such as temp, fan speed, cpu voltage, wattage and ampere, as well as power consumption and total operating time.

Additionally, the mobo came with a cool piece of software called "Bio Remote 2" which allows you to control your PC volume and video playback with any Android/Apple smartphone! (You install a small app on your PC, type your IP address into the phone app, and your phone becomes a remote control!) Pretty cool stuff.

Anyway, thanks for all the help. I'll probably check in again once my Arctic Silver has a chance to set (after 200 hours), at which time I'll attempt to gently overclock. What do you think I could safely crank this baby up to?

EDIT: Just remembered reading about the potential problem with tall heat spreaders interfering with the fan on the Hyper 212+. That is certainly the case with mine... I do not have the space to put 4 ripjaws in my system because the heatsink fan invades the space where the ram plugs in. If I choose to add two more 4gb DDR3s, how do you recommend dealing with this? Find some ram with lower profile head spreaders?

Here's my specs: http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=2017837
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 26, 2011 5:56:23 PM

Writing to you now from my newly built PC.

Well, everything went quite well, considering. It powered on the very first time, which is truly cause for celebration.


Congratulations on your new build.

Here are a few problems I had:

- It turns out the 2xmolex to 8pin atx wasn't necessary (I couldn't find it locally anyway). The 4-pin I referred to before fit into pins 1-2-5-6 (the manual illustration was wrong) of the 2nd 8-pin ATX. However, I did find a 12v 4 pin to 8 pin ATX adapter, which I purchased just in case. Turns out, I didn't need it. And my fears about plugging in the wrong connectors was unfounded. The PCI-E plugs (which require different power settings) are "keyed" differently... in other words, the plastic molding around each of the 8-pins are different for PCI-E and the mobo, and so you'd have to force it. Computer building has become rather idiot-proof thee days.


Well you'd be surprised at what idiots can and have done like forcing the connector into the socket even if they're not keyed correctly.

- I mistakenly tried to install my upgrade version of windows on my new 1TB HDD and that didn't work at all. That meant I had to go back in and plug in my old 500gb HDD (which I had backed up and didn't plan to use), which led to the following frustration:

- Why, oh WHY are the SATA connectors not oriented straight up? They're aligned to the front of the case, right behind where the HDDs are parked, so it makes plugging in the SATA cable unnecessarily difficult. If I had known this beforehand, I would have plugged in the HDDs before, but it wouldn't have fixed my Windows install problem (see further down).


Motherboard manufacturers received many complaints when the SATA ports were facing up because the customers couldn't access or even use the ports when they use long expansion cards like high end graphics cards because the cards would block/cover the ports completely.

- I said goodbye to my old DVD burner and decided to but a new lightscribe 24x DVD-R. It's nice to have a DVD burner whose face matches the color of my case.

I had the same problem and ended up doing the same thing you did.

But really, that was it. Once Windows was installed, driver software installed and all updates downloaded, the thing worked perfectly. In fact, once I completed the Windows Easy Transfer, it was rather surprising how little things appeared to change.

Save up for an SSD.

That is, until I reinstalled Mafia 2 and cranked up all the detail and PhysX settings.

Holy cow, what a difference. I tried cranking the settings on my old machine and it absolutely choked. FPS went down to 3-4. With PhysX off, it ran great-- about 40fps. Now with all settings cranked (including PhysX) I'm experiencing 40fps! PhysX off, it's up to 56fps. (Mind you, this is withing having overclocked anything yet). My CPU temp is averaging 38c (I've seen it go up as high as 42c). The mobo comes with a really handy piece of software called "Green Power Utility" in which you can monitor all critical core functions such as temp, fan speed, cpu voltage, wattage and ampere, as well as power consumption and total operating time.


The PCI Express 2.0 on the P67 chipset of the new motherboard has twice the throughput of the PCI Express 1.1a on the P965 chipset on your old P5B.

Additionally, the mobo came with a cool piece of software called "Bio Remote 2" which allows you to control your PC volume and video playback with any Android/Apple smartphone! (You install a small app on your PC, type your IP address into the phone app, and your phone becomes a remote control!) Pretty cool stuff.

Anyway, thanks for all the help. I'll probably check in again once my Arctic Silver has a chance to set (after 200 hours), at which time I'll attempt to gently overclock. What do you think I could safely crank this baby up to?


You're welcome.

High overclocks aren't guaranteed. There are too many variables that can affect stability. Even the fabrication plant and date of manufacture of the CPU affect how much of an overclock you can attain. It comes down to a lot of trial and error and luck.
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September 26, 2011 6:50:47 PM

Can you talk a little about the real practical use benefits of a SSD? (My "Windows Experience Index" is stuck at 5.9 because my "Primary Hard Disk", a Maxtor 7200 rpm SATA rev 2.0 @ 3gb/s, is the slowest part of my new system. My other WEI scores are 7.6)

I know SSDs are faster, but they're so expensive right now and are relatively small in size. What's the best way to use them? Install the OS on the SSD and install games to the 7200 drives?

This one for example, $210 for a 120gb drive. There's not too much you can do with that. Consider that Windows 7 alone will take up about 10% of total drive space, and that's tiny compared with what some big modern games would require.

Incidentally, tech support at Biostar confirms that the 4-pin will deliver less stable power than the 2x 4-pin molex to 8-pin atx. The 4 to 8 pin adapter I bought doesn't deliver more power-- it just fits the plug. So it looks like I'll be ordering that cable anyway.
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 26, 2011 8:31:18 PM

My Windows 7 WEI for the Primary Hard Disk was also at 5.9 when using a pair of WDC Raptors in RAID0.

When I replaced the RAID0 array with a single Corsair Force 3 120 GB SSD the WEI jumped up to 7.9. The Corsair Force 3 120 GB SSD (SATA3 6Gb/s) was purchased for $193 new.

Windows 7 takes much shorter time to load.

The games that I play most often are installed on the SSD so that they load much faster.

I just saw another brand that has two 8-pin EPS power connectors on the motherboard the EVGA Z68 FTW with EATX Form Factor. It's a high end motherboard board that can handle three graphics cards in 3-way CrossFireX or SLI mode. If your using that many graphics cards your power supply would have a high power rating and would most likely have at least two EPS connectors if it's a reputable brand.
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a b V Motherboard
September 27, 2011 2:04:45 AM

Congrats on the build, I see you're running the memory at 9-9-9-24 timings on a 7-7-7-21 capable mem, set the values manually from the bios and it'll give you a few more FPS on the games, the mobo most likely set higher values by default.

As for the OC, alot of people claim they can do over 4.2ghz stable without even touching voltage, so I think 4ghz would be a safe bet( keep an eye on the temps), use prime 95 for some hours (4+) to test for stability.

And long as you don't put too much voltage and keep it cool it won't do no harm
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September 28, 2011 6:06:38 PM

Well, here's the latest in the build drama.

My impetuous purchase of a 120GB SSD arrived.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

First impressions... this thing is outrageously tiny. About 1/2-1/3 the size of a pack of cards. I was expecting this thing to arrive in a box, but it arrived in a bubble wrap envelope. Crazy.

I installed the thing... excited to finally get a chance to plug something in to one of my unused SATA 3 ports. Windows booted, and I updated the firmware. All seems good. Then I see instructions that I need to change the SATA settings in BIOS to AHCI (mine was set to IDE). I rebooted aaannd.... Windows crashed. The system is unbootable. I did some research and discovered that changing your SATA BIOS settings sometimes has that pleasant side effect. How nice.

Well, I was planning to reinstall Windows on the SSD anyway, so this was not as great a tragedy as it might have seemed at first. I spent about 5 hours reinstalling windows & downloading updates, and getting my settings back in order (Windows Easy Transfer is quite an amazing little piece of software for this purpose). When all was said and done, I had about 57 GB left from my 120 GB SSD. (I also have two 7200RPM drives, a 1TB and 500GB).

And, that's pretty much where we are now. Everything installed, everything apparently stable. Just waiting for my 2 x Moles to 8-pin adapter to arrive on Thursday, and I'll see about finally attempting my first overclock!
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September 28, 2011 6:17:35 PM

Oh, and in case you were curious, my overall Windows Experience index jumped to 7.5.

And my "primary hard drive" number (which was my bottleneck) went from something like 5.9 to 7.9!
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a c 222 V Motherboard
September 28, 2011 7:13:59 PM

You really didn't need to reinstall Windows when you changed the SATA mode from IDE to AHCI.

All you needed to do was to make a registry modification before switching from IDE to AHCI and everything would have been fine.

Good to hear that it's working and your primary disk performance is working at the maximum.
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September 28, 2011 7:36:33 PM

ko888 said:
You really didn't need to reinstall Windows when you changed the SATA mode from IDE to AHCI.

All you needed to do was to make a registry modification before switching from IDE to AHCI and everything would have been fine.

Good to hear that it's working and your primary disk performance is working at the maximum.


Live and learn.... but my goal was to ultimately reinstall windows on the SSD anyway. So no harm no foul.
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!