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I7 2600k cooling problem with no OC

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Anonymous
January 15, 2011 10:22:41 PM

Hi guys, built my new system today. Basically when I run the i7 under stress testing (prime95), it peaks at 3.6GHz with temperatures exceeding 80degrees. I haven't bothered with any overclocking and I have the stock HSF installed properly with a extra layer of thermal compound applied. I am running on a msi p67 gd65 with 8gb 1600mhz g.skill

Any suggestions as to why my temps are so high with no OC? Thanks!

I am running on a msi p67 gd65 with 8gb 1600mhz g.skill

More about : 2600k cooling problem

a b à CPUs
January 15, 2011 10:34:46 PM

It's probably that extra layer of paste. You have to apply it correctly for it to work properly. Run a line of tim from top to bottom - left and right being the cutouts.
Anonymous
January 15, 2011 10:52:06 PM

suteck said:
It's probably that extra layer of paste. You have to apply it correctly for it to work properly. Run a line of tim from top to bottom - left and right being the cutouts.

I will give this a go and post back with the results, thanks for the suggestion!
Related resources
a b à CPUs
January 15, 2011 10:55:48 PM

FOLLOW THIS if my description sounds vague and scroll down to page 5.
Anonymous
January 15, 2011 11:56:31 PM

suteck said:
FOLLOW THIS if my description sounds vague and scroll down to page 5.

I followed that guide and it helped to reduce temps a fair bit, roughly 15-20degrees. I am now running at no more than 70degrees. I realise this is still fairly high but is this a safe temperature for the CPU to operate without doing any damage to itself or other components?

Also I think I will invest in a third party HSF, any suggestions for the 1155 socket that are reasonably priced?

Thanks again, I always thought the more thermal paste the better.

I would suggest anyone who is installing a sandy bridge CPU with the stock HSF to not add any more thermal paste than is supplied. :heink: 
a b à CPUs
January 16, 2011 12:21:05 AM

HYPER 212 PLUS is a highly recommended and very good cpu cooler for only $38. It is 155.5mm tall off the cpu so make sure your case is big enough. Most of today's mid and full towers are but I don't know what you have so I wanted to make sure you took that into account. As well as any case fan that might be on that side's cover.

You say 70*C? That's during stress testing right? Just asking to be sure because that's still high for normal operating. That cpu's temp is fine to 72.6*C which is Intel's stated operating temp. And you can run it higher than that but the higher you go the quicker you'll shorten the MTBF hours. So even if you hit 80*C during stress testing you'll be fine during normal operations.
Anonymous
January 16, 2011 9:42:17 AM

suteck said:
HYPER 212 PLUS is a highly recommended and very good cpu cooler for only $38. It is 155.5mm tall off the cpu so make sure your case is big enough. Most of today's mid and full towers are but I don't know what you have so I wanted to make sure you took that into account. As well as any case fan that might be on that side's cover.

You say 70*C? That's during stress testing right? Just asking to be sure because that's still high for normal operating. That cpu's temp is fine to 72.6*C which is Intel's stated operating temp. And you can run it higher than that but the higher you go the quicker you'll shorten the MTBF hours. So even if you hit 80*C during stress testing you'll be fine during normal operations.

I have taken the stock HSF in and out multiple times and fitted it as best as is possible however i'm never under the impression that it is tight up against the CPU entirely. I will certainly consider purchasing one of those coolers you linked to, I have a CM haf 22 so I should have no problems.

Yea it's under stress testing from prime95, when I see people OCing these CPUs to 4.8GHz on air, it makes me wonder what I am doing wrong. In saying that, you have really helped clear things up for me and I'll be sure to ditch the stock cooler ASAP... And also to apply the correct amount of thermal paste on the new one ;D Cheers!
January 16, 2011 12:32:46 PM

You probably have quiet mode running on the fan controller which keeps the cpu fan speed running low, I would select normal operation.
Anonymous
January 16, 2011 1:09:30 PM

kg4icg said:
You probably have quiet mode running on the fan controller which keeps the cpu fan speed running low, I would select normal operation.

Thanks for the suggestion, I'll be sure to try this also.
Quote:
What board do you have?

I know some of the mobos something was wrong with the internal pll setting with the manufacturers bios. Fixes has been released for it

http://hwbot.org/forum/showthread.php?t=15952


Thanks for this link, it makes for some interesting reading. I can't believe what the frequencies some people are achieving with air cooling. I have the msi-p67a-gd65 so I'll install this new bios and see what happens.

I'll post back with the results. Also I know I should probably read more into the forums but how do I select a best answer that will label the thread as 'solved' I have never got round to finding out how and I guess it would make the thread easier for people with similar problems to myself in the future, thanks.



Anonymous
January 16, 2011 2:55:31 PM

Quote:
please let us know. the one user managed to push it from 4.8 to 5.4 with the bios fixes

There were 2 bios fixes available for my specific mobo however I tried both but to no avail, the temperatures remained roughly the same, if not slightly hotter. I left the settings at default with most things being set to 'auto,' would you recommend entering in any of my own values. Not sure if this will help but:
DRAM voltage=1.488
SA voltage=0.928
CPU vcore=1.224

I checked the fans and 2 out of 3 of them are running as stated in speedfan(the cpu fan is working adequetly so that should not be an issue)

The only setting I changed in the bios was the RAM frequency, I changed it from 1333mhz to 1600mhz which is it's native speed
January 16, 2011 6:36:47 PM

Anonymous said:
I have taken the stock HSF in and out multiple times and fitted it as best as is possible...
Are you cleaning off and reapplying the thermal paste each time? If not, you may get bubbles and poor contact between heat sink and CPU.
Anonymous
January 16, 2011 7:07:31 PM

HankB99 said:
Are you cleaning off and reapplying the thermal paste each time? If not, you may get bubbles and poor contact between heat sink and CPU.

Yea done it again with a completely new and thin layer of thermal paste, getting the same temperatures.

This is starting to get slightly worrying!
January 17, 2011 9:50:30 PM

Anonymous said:
Yea done it again with a completely new and thin layer of thermal paste, getting the same temperatures.

This is starting to get slightly worrying!

The next thing that sticks out is "and fitted it as best as is possible however i'm never under the impression that it is tight up against the CPU entirely."

Have you taken a second look at the mounts for the heat sink? Some are made to work with multiple generations of both AMD and Intel processors. I can only imagine that it might be easy to get something wrong with the mount that could lead to less than satisfactory contact to the CPU. I suppose you've already done that but it's all I can think of.

Is the surface of the heat sink absolutely flat? Is something interfering with the fit? Is the processor properly seated in the socket?
Anonymous
January 18, 2011 5:28:23 PM

I finally decided to give in and get an aftermarket cooler (CM hyper 212). I am now running under full load at stock frequencies at an average of 47c. Thanks everyone for your input, looks like it was the stock cooler afterall :/ 
!