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Not seeing my old HDD's after new build

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January 30, 2013 1:29:50 PM

Hello everyone

I am just after a little advice please. Yesterday I built a new rig and decided I was going to use an SSD to run windows from. That installation went fine.

However previously I was using two 160GB SATA drives, one for windows and one to store my larger files. However now I am all up and running my PC does not see these older HDD's at all. How do I go about getting them back operational?

They are both most definitely fully connected up.

My BIOS does see them however Windows Disk Management does not...









The two Maxtor drives being the ones which cannot be seen, I just want to use them as backup drives for files now.

Via BIOS I can boot into the original Maxtor drive but it doesn't see the Samsung SSD when windows is loaded, When I boot in using the Samsung as default it doesn't see the Maxtor drives when windows is loaded.

It's annoying me to say the least, can anyone advise please?

More about : hdd build

January 30, 2013 1:50:05 PM

Hi Slayer,
Sometimes this can happen when your harddisk controllers are set to AHCI mode.
This 'advanced' mode supports hot-swapping and NCQ and is the preferred mode for SSDs; however you may have some existing harddisks that were originally partitioned and formatted using controllers in IDE mode.
Ideally you would be able to control some HDs in IDE mode and others in AHCI mode - but it doesn't work that way.
Within your BIOS setup it's all or nothing and you must choose one mode for all your HD controllers.
Unfortunately, if you have just fired up AHCI mode then these previously existing HDs can no longer be 'seen' by Windows...
Regards
January 30, 2013 2:02:43 PM

Ah right.

So basically they are no good in this new build and if I want a backup drive I should basically buy a new one? That is fine in itself as I would rather have a SSD as backup. It is just a pain really as it would have been easier to just plug these in and use them for storage!
June 15, 2013 5:24:33 PM

The solution proposed by The_OGS is incorrect. AHCI is the advance power management for SATA. The older drives could care less. The only drive that matters is the OS drive. If you installed with AHCI that is good. If you used IDE you are not going to be able to hot-swap your hard drives. It does not matter one iota if a drive was partition and formatted on a different computer.

If you have installed Windows but forgot to check your BIOS under SATA configuration in the BIOS it is set to IDE for say compatibility purposes and you don't want to reinstall Windows there is a registry setting that you can change that will allow you change from IDE to RAID or SATA or..... from AHCI to IDE or RAID or ...........from RAID to SATA or IDE. Fairly simple, but Microsoft in all it's wisdom, put out that you cannot. Microsoft did the same thing for Dynamic Disks. They say you cannot recover you data or install Windows, if the drive has been converted to Dynamic. Again, false. Not the easiest fix even for an advanced user, but far more preferable than reinstallation of Windows and subsequent programs, drivers, etc. I copied this from a different site, which I didn't save. I saved it to a text file for future reference.

To go to AHCI from IDE
To change the SATA Configuration you must start off in Windows. Create a Restore Point. Open Regedit, Backup your registry to the root of C: or to a different drive.

Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\msahci

In the right pane, right-click Start in the Name column, and then click Modify.
In the Value data box, type 0 [3 is default], and then click OK.

Close Regedit.

Reboot into your BIOS and change the Mode, Configuration or whatever your motherboard manufacturer calls it and change it from RAID to AHCI.
Boot into Windows, update your drivers or not, You must reboot. Done;
___________________________________

RAID mode from AHCI mode or IDE mode

To change the SATA Configuration you must start off in Windows. Create a Restore Point. Open Regedit, Backup your registry to the root of C: or to a different drive.

Open Regedit.
Create a Restore Point. Open Regedit, Backup your registry to the root of C: or to a different drive.

Navigate to each of these keys.....

(You might not have every key, so don't sweat it if you don't have all of these.)

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\msahci
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\iaStorV
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\iaStor

In the right pane, right-click Start in the Name column, and then click Modify.
7.In the Value data box, type 0 [3 is default], and then click OK.

Close Regedit.
Reboot into your BIOS and change the Mode, Configuration or whatever your motherboard manufacturer calls it and change it from AHCI to RAID
Boot into Windows, update your drivers or not, You must reboot again. Done;
____________________________________________

AHCI or RAID to IDE

To change the SATA Configuration you must start off in Windows. Create a Restore Point. Open Regedit, Backup your registry to the root of C: or to a different drive.

Open Regedit.
Create a Restore Point. Open Regedit, Backup your registry to the root of C: or to a different drive.

Navigate to each of these keys.....

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Pciide

(You might not have every key, so don't sweat it if you don't have all of them.)

In the right pane, right-click Start in the Name column, and then click Modify.
7.In the Value data box, type 0 [3 is default], and then click OK.

Close Regedit.

Reboot and go into your BIOS. Change your SATA configuration to IDE . Reboot.
Go into Windows, When it finishes starting, Reboot. DONE.

!