Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Electrostatic Discharge

Last response: in Systems
Share
October 22, 2010 8:53:00 PM

Hey all. I've been off-forum for awhile, so please forgive. :hello: 

I recently had a new ASUS and a new Gigabyte board, both high end, go out on me after only light usage.

Having assembled hundreds of computers since 1990, I have been rather cavalier about static, simply adhering to the "one hand on the case at all times" rule, I am now of the belief that "today's motherboards, etc. are more sensitive to ESD than years ago.

One question: I have heard that when doing a New Build the PSU should BE PLUGGED IN but of course NOT TURNED ON to take advantage of the GFI grounding. Some even say that the wrist strap should be plugged into the GFI ground directly.

Does anyone have a "for certain" answer. All I seem to get elsewhere is a lot of anecdotal "well, ah, I've always done it this way" nonsense. I would like a professional answer from someone who actually understands electricity and ESD.

Thanks,

IncurableGeek

Best solution

a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2010 8:59:00 PM

Due to the nature of how powered equipment is made, as long as the PSU is plugged into the wall its outer metal casing is connected directly to ground, this protects the user in case something inside the casing shorts against the casing. Since you screw the PSU into the case using metal screws this now means that the metal of the case is connected directly to ground, so if you are holding onto the case you are pretty well grounded and most excess charge on you is dissipated. Using a wrist strap avoids the issue of forgetting to touch a case, especially if you are breadboarding it, so its common for professionals to use them, but for just working on your PC 99.99% of the time just staying in contact with the case will keep you from building up any notable amount of charge.
Share
October 22, 2010 9:21:44 PM

hunter315 said:
Due to the nature of how powered equipment is made, as long as the PSU is plugged into the wall its outer metal casing is connected directly to ground, this protects the user in case something inside the casing shorts against the casing. Since you screw the PSU into the case using metal screws this now means that the metal of the case is connected directly to ground, so if you are holding onto the case you are pretty well grounded and most excess charge on you is dissipated. Using a wrist strap avoids the issue of forgetting to touch a case, especially if you are breadboarding it, so its common for professionals to use them, but for just working on your PC 99.99% of the time just staying in contact with the case will keep you from building up any notable amount of charge.


Now That is One Heckuva Clear-Cut, No BS Answer.

Do I have your permission to quote you on other forums?

Thanks,

IG :) 
m
0
l
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2010 9:51:29 PM

You definitely do.
m
0
l
October 29, 2010 1:06:14 AM

Best answer selected by incurablegeek.
m
0
l
!