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Ivy Bridge on 1155! But...

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a b à CPUs
January 21, 2011 6:12:23 PM

Well most people get mad at Intel for changing sockets about as often as clothes, but hey, sometimes it IS necessary, better to buy a new motherboard than have a crippled CPU. The good news is it seems (this is Fud, so yes, the salt) Ivy Bridge, Sandy Bridge E, whatever you want to call it, will be on socket 1155. The bad news is...it wont be compatible with current 1155 motherboards, due to chipset and controller incompatibilities. Also, if its still on 1155, that means it should still be dual channel memory, unless things have changed. Opinions?

http://www.fudzilla.com/processors/item/21621-ivy-bridg...

More about : ivy bridge 1155

a b à CPUs
January 21, 2011 6:17:24 PM

Then why is it going to be made for the new lga2011 socket that is coming out towards the end of this year and the 1155? Seems weird to me.
a b à CPUs
January 21, 2011 6:20:59 PM

Maybe it's going to be like Netburst. First 423, then suddenly 478... then also 775. Then they changed to the Core 2 architecture which is also the same 775, but most of the Intel chipsets for P4 and PD won't support the Core 2 chips... sounds like they are shooting themself in the foot before the 32nm are even out a year.
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a b V Motherboard
January 22, 2011 3:22:44 AM

No, like 1156/1366.
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a b V Motherboard
January 22, 2011 3:30:11 AM

Well, LGA 2011 is a ton of pins. I'm not sure that is really needed (or what they would even use all the pins for - the new chips should still be small and power efficient).
a b à CPUs
January 22, 2011 3:30:54 AM

I just think it is funny that 775 sockets can support Netburst and Core CPUs without a socket change. Some of the new 775 boards can work for all of them. I replaced the dead Asus P5P800-MX in my P4 rig with a second hand ASRock P43D1600Twins... even though Intel dropped support for the Netburst CPUs on the same socket, some manufacturers are good enough to make it work even if Intel doesn't want it to.

So hopefully the next revision will still fit the same 1155 socket and the manufacturers will include the hardware and software in the EFI to run it. So maybe it won't be all that bad.
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January 22, 2011 4:03:13 AM

A lot of people seem confused about the difference between Sandy Bridge E LGA 2011 and Ivy Bridge LGA 1155 and think they are the same thing. Sandy Bridge E LGA 2011 is basically the current Sandy Bridge CPUs scaled up with more cores, memory channels, PCIe lanes and a BCLK that can be freely increased minus the integrated GPU. The extra memory channels (reportedly quad-channel), and PCIe lanes (as many as 40) are the reason behind that insane pin count.

Ivy Bridge on the other hand is just simply a die shrink and slight reworking of the existing Sandy Bridge CPUs, with some small speed bumps and maybe core count increases.
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January 22, 2011 4:13:57 AM

I don't see why fudzilla a year before launch counts as a reliable source.

Seriously, this has about as much predictive value as a talking baboon.
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January 22, 2011 5:24:37 AM

cjl said:
I don't see why fudzilla a year before launch counts as a reliable source.

Seriously, this has about as much predictive value as a talking baboon.

:lol:  I agree!
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a b V Motherboard
January 22, 2011 5:59:07 AM

cjl said:
I don't see why fudzilla a year before launch counts as a reliable source.

Seriously, this has about as much predictive value as a talking baboon.


I would agree. It seems unlikley that a die shrink would bring about any incompatabilities considering that pretty much everything is on the CPU now and the chipset has very little to do with compatability beyond it being able to recognize the CPU and provide the correct voltage.

I am sure that if it was possble, without the GPU integrated on die, Sandy bridge probably could have been placed on LGA1156. But wih a on die GPU it probably changed the pin layout compared to the MCM that current LGA1156 CPU/GPUs have too much to be saved. The chipset means nothing. Hell AsRock created a LGA1156 mobo with the P67 chipset:

http://www.techpowerup.com/135241/ASRock-Designs-LGA115...

That alone shows the chipsets little influence in CPU support these days. I imagine soon the northbridge chipset may not exist and at some point the southbridge may also get moved to the CPU.
a b à CPUs
January 22, 2011 7:00:53 AM

^+1

Right. The chipset doesn't mean much about CPU support. I am running a P4 670 on the P43 chipset even though it is not supported, works fine. It is more about voltage support, and that is why the Core 2 Duo won't run on the 865 motherboards. Not because of the chipset, but because of the CPU voltage regulators don't match.
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January 22, 2011 12:11:46 PM

Quote:
I'm waiting for 2011 and then ditching 1155 for it.


Thanks for sharing.
!