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Amd made of fail!!!

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a c 126 à CPUs
a b À AMD
January 22, 2011 11:43:09 PM

Thats extremley old. 2001. Back when Tom was still with Toms Hardware. Good time.

It isn't the same though. AMD has made amazing progress from that time and their CPUs are decent especially if you are on a very tight budget.
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a c 78 à CPUs
a b À AMD
January 22, 2011 11:48:36 PM

Interesting Video from 2001...

I won't use that video as a reason to not buy an AMD. I would have to see this repeated with an AM3 CPU and an Intel i# CPU to verify similar results. Both CPU's / Platforms are good and each meet a demand in the market.
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a b à CPUs
January 22, 2011 11:58:48 PM

True, if you want a high performance CPU
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a c 126 à CPUs
a b À AMD
January 23, 2011 1:20:34 AM

^what browser are you using that doesn't support YouTube?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgOmMAasqto

Because thats all it is. A video Tom made back before he sold THG to Best of Mdeia. It took two modern (in 2001) AMD and Intel CPUs, ran Quake and while it was running, they took off the HSF to see if the CPU could survive without it as well as the game.

The Pentium 4 did great, game didn't even crash just slowed down to about 7FPS and hit 39c. Strange I know but the original S423 and the early S478 (Northwood) Pentium 4s were actually decent CPUs at the time.

The Pentium III lived but the game crashed and it hit 30c or so.

Both AMDs died. The Athlon 1400+ got to about 370c and fried itself along with the mobo. The Palamino 1200 did the same but also killed the diode temp sensor.

Was a good idea at the time but new CPUs are too advanced. If they get too hot they will downclock and then turn off completley so its hard to test this anymore. Still 370c is insane....
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a b à CPUs
January 23, 2011 2:09:57 AM

Best answer selected by reynod.
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a b à CPUs
January 23, 2011 2:10:56 AM

Wow...

That video is uber old.

Back then Intel had a sensor built into the die of their CPUs. If the CPU reached above a certain temperature... the whole system would shut down.

AMD, on the other hand, relied on motherboard makers to implement a temperature sensor near the CPU socket (or in a squarish space found smack dab in the middle of the SocketA interface). The motherboard therefore took charge of shutting down the PC if the CPU overheated.

Problem was that the implementation was a failure as the video shows.

I remember those days quite well.
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a b à CPUs
January 23, 2011 2:17:21 AM

Guys we don't want any "Intel is Doomed", "NVidiot" or "AMD Fail" threads as someone always ends up losing an eye, getting a warning / ban, burning the toast and generally ending up miserable.

:) 
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