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I7-950 build check (my first build)

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October 29, 2010 2:27:46 AM

First of all, thanks to everyone on this site - it has helped tremendously.

Seeing the crappy options for Dell's, and the ridiculous prices for a custom machine built locally, I decided to take the plunge and build my first computer. Any advice is appreciated. This is replacing a Dell Dimension 8100 P4 1.5GHz 768Mb RDRAM that is 8 or 10 years old and nearly useless now. I want this purchase to last about 5 years or so.

Approximate Purchase Date: probably within a week, but could wait a few if prices were going to drop substantially for holidays, etc.

Budget Range: about $1800 or so for everything

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Photoshop CS5, Microsoft Office, light video editing, movie/music ripping, music, email, surfing, light gaming (don't play now - last games I played were Quake2/3. My current box can't handle much more than that). Will probably play a game or two when I have a capable machine)

Parts Not Required: None. Need everything.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: probably newegg (wish there were a microcenter near me for the CPU) unless there are reliable places that are cheaper

Country of Origin: SLC, Utah, USA

Parts Preferences: Good stuff, which I think I've selected below. I don't have any brand loyalties really. But I do want an Intel CPU, likely 1366 - see below

Overclocking: Probably not, especially not at first.

SLI or Crossfire: Probably not, if so, it will be long ways down the road, and only if I have tons of time to play games (I have two young kids :)  )

Monitor Resolution: 1920 x 1080 - Will probably run just the one below (may add a second if I need more room and have more money)

Additional Comments: Don't like bling (hence the Antec 300 and no LED fans), just want speed, reliability, upgradeability.

Based on my reading on this and other sites, my proposed parts list is as follows:

Antec Three Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

ASUS Sabertooth X58 LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

XFX Black Edition P1-750B-CAG9 750W ATX12V v2.2 / ESP12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular

Intel Core i7-950 Bloomfield 3.06GHz LGA 1366 130W Quad-Core Processor BX80601950

MSI N460GTX CYCLONE 1GD5/OC GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL9T-12GBRL

4 of these: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive 1 for OS/Apps/Games, 1 for photos, 1 for video, 1 for data and Photoshop scratch drive on a partition.

ViewSonic VP2365wb Black 23" IPS LCD Monitor w/4-port USB hub

Logitech Cordless Desktop EX 100 Black USB RF Wireless Standard Keyboard and Mouse

LITE-ON 24X DVD Writer Black SATA Model iHAS424-98 LightScribe Support

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 1-Pack for System Builders - OEM

COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus

2 of these for the front of the Antec 300: Scythe S-FLEX SFF21E 120mm Case Fan

BELKIN BP112230-08 8 Feet 12 Outlets 4320 Joules Pivot-Plug Surge Protector

$1880 including shipping and discounts.

Please let me know if I have incompatible, insufficient, overkill, incomplete, or unreliable parts. Thanks for your help. - Mike

More about : 950 build check build

October 29, 2010 2:41:58 AM

You don't really need an aftermarket HSF if you're not looking to Overclock. Save the money.

Apart from that, the build looks perfect if I'm not missing something. Sound parts, great brands. Can't find a fault. Looks like you've been doing some serious research.

The only thing though is that if you're not looking to play games, the GPU might be a bit of an overkill.
October 29, 2010 4:16:21 PM

The HSF isn't very expensive, and I figure keeping the CPU a little cooler might make it last a little longer. What thermal paste do you recommend?

Originally, I was going to go with an ATI 5770. But after reading how Nvidia cards might be advantageous with Photoshop, etc., I dedided to go Nvidia. But there's not really anything in that price range. I assume that the 460 is a better card than the 260, for about the same price. Am I correct? Also, I'd like to be "game-proof" for a little while.

Is my power supply beefy enough for going SLI later if I want? If not, what should I get? Or should I just worry about that later?
Related resources
October 29, 2010 4:51:27 PM

lcp84047 said:
The HSF isn't very expensive, and I figure keeping the CPU a little cooler might make it last a little longer. What thermal paste do you recommend?

Originally, I was going to go with an ATI 5770. But after reading how Nvidia cards might be advantageous with Photoshop, etc., I dedided to go Nvidia. But there's not really anything in that price range. I assume that the 460 is a better card than the 260, for about the same price. Am I correct? Also, I'd like to be "game-proof" for a little while.

Is my power supply beefy enough for going SLI later if I want? If not, what should I get? Or should I just worry about that later?


hey mate, Im currently planning the same i7 950 build but on a $1600 budget.

1st off I highly recommend SSD to put the OS and most used apps on.

Thermal Paste

I am going to use either dual Gtx 460's in sli or Dual 6850 in Crossfire
the 6950's save $50 and score higher fps in the benchmarks then dual gtx 460's, but there minimum fps shown is about half of the gtx 460's.

and the recommended PSU for 2 gtx 460's is 750W so i'd go 800w or 850w (I'm getting 850W Corsair

hope I helped!
October 29, 2010 6:46:29 PM

vindictive said:
hey mate, Im currently planning the same i7 950 build but on a $1600 budget.

1st off I highly recommend SSD to put the OS and most used apps on.

Thermal Paste

I am going to use either dual Gtx 460's in sli or Dual 6950 in Crossfire
the 6950's save $50 and score higher fps in the benchmarks then dual gtx 460's, but there minimum fps shown is about half of the gtx 460's.

and the recommended PSU for 2 gtx 460's is 750W so i'd go 800w or 850w (I'm getting 850W Corsair

hope I helped!


+1 to vindictive on the comment about a crossfire setup with 6850 and the corsair 850ax psu it is a beast, aswell as getting an ssd for your machine. With a build of $1800 you definitely need to get the most out of it and the bottleneck on this build would be the hdd so an ssd is to your benefit. As to the gfx card you can go with a xfire setup or for the mean time you can get a 6870 and xfire later. Both of these gfx card setups would be awesome for your needs if you'd like me to suggest a build let me know
October 29, 2010 7:03:44 PM

Here is some info on building a photoshop machine Guidelines if you will I will posting my suggestion build in a few minutes:

How to set up a great Photoshop machine
At Photoshop World this week, performance testing lead Adam Jerugim presented a performance guide with hardware recommendations and information about the CS5 performance preferences. I’ve put his notes in this post’s extended entry.


Operating Systems: Mac OS 10.6.4 and Windows 7 64-bit

CPU: Intel Core i7/Xeon or AMD Phenom II/Opteron with 4 cores. More than 4 cores gives diminishing returns.

RAM: Enough to keep Efficiency readout at 100%. If Efficiency is low (<95%), adding RAM will provide biggest benefit. 4GB will cover most digital photography uses. 8GB leaves room for other apps and fits huge documents in RAM.

Video Card: Any modern card with at least 512MB VRAM; 1GB if doing heavy 3D work.

Disk: Use a separate disk for Photoshop scratch. If you spend a lot of time opening / saving large data files, another separate disk for data files will speed that up. Faster disks are better. RAID0 is faster. SSD is faster yet. RAID0 of SSDs is fastest but super expensive. If you have plenty of RAM (meaning your Efficiency readout is 95% or more), separate/faster disks for scratch provide minimal benefit. If Efficiency readout is low, a separate SSD for Photoshop scratch will be a big win. SSD boot volume will speed booting and app launch, but not Photoshop operations.

Memory Usage: this should be no higher than 70% on systems running 32bit Photoshop or with less than 4GB of total physical RAM. On systems with 8GB or more, use 70% if you plan on running other applications at the same time as PS, or higher (up to 90%) if you only plan on using PS on your system.

Efficiency %: can be found in the document window drop-down options. Operations fit in RAM when this 95% or greater.

History & Cache: if you work with small documents with lots of layers, start with the Tall and Thin button (which will set cache levels = 2, tile size = 128K/132K). If you work with large documents with few layers, try the Big and Flat button (which will set cache levels = 6, tile size = 1024K/1028K). Using more history states uses more scratch disk space. More history states may also use more RAM, particularly when running actions or scripts on large documents. If you see Efficiency drop below 95%, especially after running actions, try reducing history states or adding RAM.

Scratch Disks: a separate drive for Photoshop scratch disk will avoid slowdowns from Photoshop and the OS trying to access the disk at the same time. If your Efficiency number often drops below 95%, the gain can be large. Faster disks are better. A RAID0 array is faster, an SSD faster still. If using a RAID or SSD, try setting the Tile Size to 1024K – AMD CPUs prefer 132K / 1028K sizes, but 128K and especially 1024K are more efficient for RAID and SSD use regardless of CPU type.

GPU Settings: you can change GPU settings by clicking on the Advanced Settings button. For more more modern video cards there will be three options: Basic, Normal, Advanced. Changes to this setting will only take effect after PS restart, and would be worth experimenting with if painting performance is sluggish.
October 29, 2010 7:19:33 PM

syxxnyne69 said:
+1 to vindictive on the comment about a crossfire setup with 6850 and the corsair 850ax psu it is a beast, aswell as getting an ssd for your machine. With a build of $1800 you definitely need to get the most out of it and the bottleneck on this build would be the hdd so an ssd is to your benefit. As to the gfx card you can go with a xfire setup or for the mean time you can get a 6870 and xfire later. Both of these gfx card setups would be awesome for your needs if you'd like me to suggest a build let me know


hahah, you told me most of that for my build anyway xD
just passing the knowledge on!
October 29, 2010 7:22:33 PM

Ok here it is let me know what you think:

CD/DVDRW : LITE-ON Black 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM 2MB Cache SATA CD/DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM

PC CASE/CHASSIS : COOLER MASTER HAF 922 RC-922M-KKN1-GP Black Steel + Plastic and Mesh Bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

STORAGE HDD: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F4 HD204UI 2TB 5400 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive


GPU/GRAPHICS CARD: SAPPHIRE 100314SR Radeon HD 6870 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card with Eyefinity


KEYBOARD/MOUSE COMBO: Microsoft 4GC-00002 Silver/Black 102 Normal Keys Wireless Ergonomic Laser Desktop 4000 - OEM


MEMORY/RAM: CORSAIR XMS3 12GB (6 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model HX3X12G1600C9 G


OS: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 1-Pack for System Builders - OEM


PSU/MOBO COMBO : Combo: 524609

PSU: CORSAIR Professional Series AX850 850W ATX12V v2.31 / EPS12V v2.92 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply

MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard


CPU/OS MAIN HDD: Combo: 532977

CPU: Intel Core i7-950 Bloomfield 3.06GHz 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1366 130W Quad-Core Processor BX80601950

OS MAIN HDD: OCZ Vertex 2 OCZSSD3-2VTX120G 3.5" 120GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)


We can always go down in ram and get a bigger ssd, which depends on how much photoshop you actually do this build comes in at a little under $1800 while with a 180gb ssd it will come in at about 1807$

Running 3 instances of photoshop, crysis, and your editing videos at the same time then 12Gb would make a difference. Otherwise if your not running a setup like that then we need to downgrade on ram






November 1, 2010 4:40:54 PM

I don't plan on SLI, so it's one card for now. The system syxxnyne69 suggests sounds good, but I'm not going for SSD now, as I don't mind a little boot time, and SSD are just too expensive right now. And I want 3x 4Gb RAM so I have slots open to add to later. Of course, the GSkill set I had thought of is now out of stock. Is this the sort of thing that will be in stock again soon, or never? Can anyone recommend an alternative 3 x 4Gb set for around the same price?
November 1, 2010 11:38:03 PM

whats your budget for ram there is nothing specifically in that price range.
November 2, 2010 5:26:21 PM

I just placed my order on newegg. Luckily, the RAM I originally wanted came back in stock, and cheaper at $200. And the i7-950 had a promo code. Also, I decided to go for a beefier PSU with 850 W and more SATA connectors, and it had a promo code (Corsair 850HX). Other than that, the build is the same as I proposed. I made the list public - search "2010build-lcp84047" on newegg's public builds.

Thanks for everyone's help. Hopefully the build goes well - if not, I know where to go for help. - Mike
November 6, 2010 7:48:53 PM

I'd like to build the same but using the i7-965. Should I use the Asus board as lcp84047 uses for his build or should I use something else?
November 7, 2010 8:10:46 AM

@art - I don't know what you're gonna use your machine for, but the Sabertooth should be good enough for any 1366 build.

Another option - GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R
November 7, 2010 4:59:02 PM

@calguyhunk, thanks for the reply. I do alot of photoshop/illustrator/dreamweaver work. Usually have many of these heavy duty apps running at once and email open. If you have any advice please feel free to suggest anything!

Also, I wonder if they fixed the problem with the gigabyte boards I'm reading here
November 7, 2010 7:49:13 PM

I think the issue might still be outstanding. This issue with the Raid Controller - doesn't seem like that the problem has been fixed. But it's only likely to affect you if you have a RAID set-up. There is a workaround, but no fix as such going by what I've read thus far on the net. Might as well get the Sabertooth just to be on the safe side.
November 7, 2010 8:58:36 PM

Thanks, yeah I'll play it safe and go with the sabertooth. One thing that I'm confused over is what type of cooling I should use. I do not plan on overclocking. Should I use liquid cooling or the hsf setup that lcp84047 is using? I don't mind spending the cash to keep the processor a little cooler, just wondering which would do a better job and which would be quieter.
November 7, 2010 11:40:52 PM

good luck with your first build . i just finisher mine its all working great. Some friendly advise read all the toms build your own articles and watch a lot of you tube videos. i learned a lot of stuff there. its good to see it before you start building.

AsRock x58-xtreme mobo

7.1 CH Windows vista Premium level HD Audio
(DAC with 110dB dynamic range (ALC890 Audio Codec)

Intel Core i7 930 Mhz
CORSAIR DOMINATOR 6GB (3x2GB) 240-Pin SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) CMP6GX3M3A1600C8
CM 690 case
CM 750 watt ps
CM Hyper N520
PowerColor Radeon 5850 gpu
Asus CD ROM
M-audio Studiophile AV 40 speakers

November 7, 2010 11:48:48 PM

if your not going to over clock an after market fan cooler is fine $30.00/$50.00. If you wanted to step it up a bit the new corsair H70 is suppose to do a great job for a water cooling kit @ about $100.00.
November 7, 2010 11:53:59 PM

Thanks gerry410..definitely will check out those resources more. Is there a noise reduction benefit or any other with the liquid versus the hsf? I don't plan on looking at the thing so the "wow" factor doesn't need to be a concern.
November 7, 2010 11:54:16 PM

gerry410 said:
if your not going to over clock an after market fan cooler is fine $30.00/$50.00. If you wanted to step it up a bit the new corsair H70 is suppose to do a great job for a water cooling kit @ about $100.00.


Wow the h70 is overly expensive for the performance it provides go with the a70 from corsair air cooling dual fan heatsink it has a rebate to knock its price down to under $40 and it performs almost at the level of the Noctua D-14 at 1/3 the cost
November 11, 2010 7:22:54 PM

art2010 said:
If you have any advice please feel free to suggest anything!


I was planning on building my machine this weekend, since everything came this week. However, I stumbled on the fact that Win 7 Home can only support 16 Gb RAM. Since I want the ability to max out the MoBo in the future by adding 12Gb to the original 12Gb, I RMA'ed the Win 7 Home (luckily I hadn't opened it yet) and ordered Win7 Pro. Something to think about if you plan to upgrade RAM later. Win 7 RAM support Link
November 11, 2010 11:43:46 PM

Damn! I did not know that. Thanks, I'll go with pro.
November 12, 2010 3:04:44 AM

24 Gb of ram?? are you planning on flying to the moon? My roomates brother works for Pixar and their computers only have 8 Gb of RAM. I really have no clue what types of heavy solid memory eating apps your running but 24 Gb seems excessive. From what I have read, other computer builders, and my own past exp. 2 Gb for the people who just use their computer for family use, 4gb for the gamers/ light photo shop user, 8Gb for the Lightscribe,video editing, CAD user; and 12 Gb for the richer enthusiast who plans on doing all of the previous but simultaneously.

Now if you have a legit reason for wanting 24 Gb of RAM please let me know because I am ignorant to its uses. (May be put your OS on it instead of an ssd? in which case I dont understand either) Sorry if that came off as satirical, I apologize if it was. Just bewildered me with those numbers is all.
November 12, 2010 3:33:03 PM

When I bought my Pentium 4 that this is replacing, it had 512Mb RAM. I thought "I'll never need more than that". Guess what? I soon needed more than that.

This is primarily a photoshop box. Photoshop writes to a temporary scratch file when it runs out of RAM. You can really never have too much RAM with photoshop if you want to avoid disk swapping when working with large multilayer files.

12Gb should be more than sufficient for a while, but I don't want to run into the issue later because of some stupid OS limitation. I get machines that are as future proof as possible without spending $$$ so they last a long time.

I could buy a 12 core Mac Pro with 24 Gb RAM, but I don't have $10,000 laying around. The extra $40 for Win 7 Pro is well worth the ability to max out my MoBo at 24Mb in the future. I'd put 24 Gb of RAM in now, if I thought it made sense. But I'll wait a couple years and get the extra for half the price. I'll have a camera with 2-3 times the resolution, and need it then.

My brother in law is an animator at Pixar, too. As I understand it, when they're working, they have a small piece of work on their desktop, which only includes certain parts (basic character positioning, etc.). It doesn't have all the lighting effects, textures, etc. Their desktop doesn't render the animation - the giant room sized server does.

I'm not trying to be a jerky know it all (I certainly don't - which is why I sought help for the computer build here). I'm just saying that you'll always want more computing power down the road, and I prefer to build so I can do upgrades instead of new purchases.

I welcome comments - I love to be more informed about this stuff.
November 15, 2010 4:51:20 PM

I guess that makes sense, because I do think the same way for other components like psu, towers, and heat sinks. I would rather shell out the extra buck rather than upgrade sooner down the road.

I am into photography a bit as well, not a master in photo shop just use it for blemishes etc. But the camera market though it has increased greatly in megapixels in the last few years but it seems the market trend is toward lenses again and trying to figure out how to get more glass onto a smaller body. But I cant say i know any one working for a camera company so my hypothesis on it are based off of what I read and see coming in the market.

I think by the time that you are going to need more RAM you might wanna upgrade to the next version of windows because there will be one by that time. But thats a gamble in itself. Also I thought the price difference was closer to 120$ more, 40$ is much more reasonable.

I apologize and believe after reading what you wrote you have a point. The only other reason I can think of right now for why its not the best idea to get 24 G of RAM is because hexa RAM ins way over priced and even buying 2 triple channel kits is more expensive then it was a year ago. Example last year I bought my crucial 8 Gb of Ram duel channel kit 1600 for 95$ now the same kit costs more than 250$ (259.99 actually)
But if price doesnt matter either to you then I am out of rope and must concede to the fact that you are correct and I was wrong.

I did enjoy going back and forth with you on this it makes me rethink things I havent rethought through in a while. btw I recall from when i was a wee lad and my dad picked up a toshiba smart system for 2000$ for christmas and it had 256 Mb hard drive haha
November 15, 2010 6:27:10 PM

No need to apologize or anything. I'm here to learn, and I appreciate any feedback.

I'll do you one better on the old computer front. When I was a freshman in college (1990), my dad got our first computer. An IBM 386DX 16MHz with a 10Mb HDD. And a state of the art inkjet printer. The whole thing cost about $3000. It is laughable. He used it until the early 2000s though (Couldn't handle the Y2K switch - all the dates in his Quicken files were screwed up).
November 16, 2010 1:52:46 AM

Haha I was only around 10 or s oduring the Y2K ordeal. I Remember my dad going out and buying water jugs to store and extra food in the basement. He worked for AT&T and said he knew that it wasnt going to be near as bad as some people made it out to be. But that he was worried about shipping and certain companies being able to keep their data bases up.

Its funny to think that a role over like that could make so much hype. I can not top that but I can remines on the fact that it had two 5 and a quarter floppy disk drives one for the program you wanted and the other for the actual pc.

Any way back on topic now ha. What types of photo shop work do you do ? Just curious.
November 16, 2010 10:28:07 AM

Guys,

At risk of really exposing my ignorance, I'm looking at the motherboard for this build and see it is SATA3 but the drive is SATA2. Am I missing something? SATA3=6 Gb/s and the SATA2=3 Gb/s.
November 16, 2010 1:42:36 PM

art2010 said:
I'm looking at the motherboard for this build and see it is SATA3 but the drive is SATA2.
Firstly, the Sabertooth has enough SATA II ports.

Secondly, they are all forward & backwards compatible. SATA II drives will work on SATA III ports and vice-versa. The only thing is, that you wont have the full capability of a 6GB/s port if the drive is only 3GB/s or vice-versa. Sometimes, you may have a poorly designed SATA controller which requires the jumper to be set on the back of the HDD, but most of the time you don't even need to bother.
November 16, 2010 11:35:25 PM

That was what I was getting at..slower port on the Mb means a faster drive will be at the mercy of the mb...no? wouldn't a sata3 drive be better?
November 17, 2010 12:24:44 AM

Also..I'm thinking of going with a 120 Gb SSD drive for the OS, and the Samsung F3 for data. Is the 850w supply overkill? I'm looking to run to SSD and Samsung drives only..I was thinking of this Corsair 750w on sale with a discount code for $100:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?nm_mc=AFC-Sl...

November 17, 2010 5:28:11 PM

For a single everything standard set-up, even the 750 will be too much, if you have no intention of adding a 2nd GPU (or a whole bunch of other drives/USB/Firewire devices) in the future.

Use this Power Supply Calculator to judge for yourself.
November 17, 2010 11:39:18 PM

Thanks, I also went over to corsairs site and plugged in my setup into their calculator. In both instances it seems 450W will be fine. I think I'm going with the Corsair VX450 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

What about the SSD in the 120 Gb range. Can you suggest anything? I'm waiting for Black Friday to do my shopping so hope to pick up a deal.
November 18, 2010 7:38:48 AM

SSD - OCZ Vertex 2 and G.SKILL Phoenix Pro.

PSU - Pick up the 550VX for cheaper. It's better to have a bit of headroom anyways. That way, the set-up runs a tad cooler and also lasts longer especially, as the capacitors age with time and usage.
November 18, 2010 9:05:44 AM

Nice..Thanks alot for your help! I've put together one hell of a shopping list..
November 18, 2010 10:46:00 AM

Art do not get the 550... That's barely any wattage, for your system Id recommend 650

Here you go: Corsair 650HX - http://goo.gl/NS8uK

It's modular, so you don't have clutter with your cable, you get to choose what cable to plug in, the unnecessary cables can be kept out of the case :) 

Corsair is one of the most respected brands
November 18, 2010 11:44:12 PM

Thanks Reaper, I'll keep an eye open for it. I've got my list, we'll see what I can pick up after black friday if anything. Something tells me the deals are gonna be few are far between. I was really hoping to get a good deal on the i7-965 extreme..

November 19, 2010 3:25:00 PM

preolt said:
Haha I was only around 10 or s oduring the Y2K ordeal. I Remember my dad going out and buying water jugs to store and extra food in the basement. He worked for AT&T and said he knew that it wasnt going to be near as bad as some people made it out to be. But that he was worried about shipping and certain companies being able to keep their data bases up.

Its funny to think that a role over like that could make so much hype. I can not top that but I can remines on the fact that it had two 5 and a quarter floppy disk drives one for the program you wanted and the other for the actual pc.

Any way back on topic now ha. What types of photo shop work do you do ? Just curious.


Right now I'm not doing any exotic photoshop stuff, but I'm taking a class and learning. I do a fair amount of stitching several 14 Mpixel RAW files together and doing HDR conversions, which take forever on a slow box. I'm sure before long, I'll have more Mpix to deal with, hence, the need for a decent processor and lots of RAM.
November 19, 2010 3:40:27 PM

Update on my build: It's all put together, Win 7 Pro installed and updated, installed Avira antivirus (waffled between that and AVG), updated drivers.

Being a noob, it took me a while to figure out how to fix the RAM timings to rated, since the BIOS set them to 1066, 8-8-8-20 1T instead of the rated 1333, 9-9-9-24 2T. I changed that. Then I ran MemTest86+ for about 22 hours (over 9 passes) with no errors.

I also ran Furmark for a couple hours on max settings and my GPU got to a max of 61degC. Ran Prime95 Blend with detect rounding errors on for about 20 hours with no errors. Max of 4 cores was 69degC, but they averaged in the mid-60s. Ran small FFT for a couple hours with same results, maybe slightly lower temp after I turned one of the exhaust fans from low to Med. I think I may have put a little too much TIM on, but I think these temps are fine, so I'm not going to mess with it. Cores run in the low 30s at idle.

Overall, I'm very happy with the build, and can't wait to put Photoshop on it to try it out. Plus, gotta figure out some good games to play (First person shooters) - any recommendations? I tried the free HAWX2 game, but I'm not big into flight simulator type games (although it did look amazing).

The cable management in the Antec 300 wasn't the greatest, especially with the power supply fan up, because it puts the hard wired cables on the wrong side of the case. And having four 1Tb drives in there didn't help either. I had to do some wire wrangling on the left side of the case, and the power cables to the GTX460 had to sort of loop around into one of the drive bays to keep from bending them to sharply. But it all worked out.

I assume all my testing and temps are good to go?

On the SATA connector discussion: The sabertooth Mobo has 6 external Sata 3Gb connetors and 2 Sata 6Gb connectors, so there are plenty inside and out.
November 19, 2010 10:57:22 PM

Thanks for this, I'm going to be sure to be on the look out for some of the issues you had while building mine.
!