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Is it possible to use a Laptop processor as Desktop processor?

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January 27, 2011 12:35:12 AM

Hi, this is my second question for today. While I was reading reviews days ago, I was actually planning to get an AMD processor but then I saw how good Intel chips were, so I decided to go with Intel. However, when I looked at the price difference, I really had to think things through, but I came up with a probably stupid idea during the process. I have an HP pavilion dv5 - 1235dx laptop right now which has an Intel Core 2 Duo T6400 processor and I wondered if I could possibly get the processor and plug it onto a new mobo. The only reason why I wanted to get a new rig was because I could not upgrade the graphics card of this laptop, which gave me limited options for games. I have not tried to open my laptop yet to check the components, but maybe there's someone among you who have tried this before. I do hope someone can tell me if it's possible or not. Thanks a lot!
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January 27, 2011 12:49:45 AM

In a word...no

Laptop & desktop sockets are entirely incompatible with one another. Not to mention, notebook CPUs are often much weaker than desktops ones, in the general sense

You can't base a processor's performance solely on its branding, AMD or Intel (although Intel has cornered the high end market). Any decent AMD quad desktop CPU would run circles around the T6400
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January 27, 2011 1:28:20 AM

Assuming you can actually get the cpu out of the laptop without damaging it you need a Socket P motherboard with PCIe x16. Like this.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
You could reuse the memory and hard drive also. Doesn't seem worthwhile though. For the price of that motherboard, you could get a desktop motherboard, faster cpu and memory. The cost of a 7200rpm desktop drive is offset by the need for a mobile cpu heatsink. And you'd still have a 2 year old laptop.
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May 31, 2011 4:35:05 PM

Most people would say no. But I say it all depends on what motherboard you have; they the ones who make it, they would know best. I have test that out and it works fine. The motherboard was ak77-axn aopen. According to the manufacture, it will accept athlon xp. I replace it with Athlon XP-M, and it works fine. According to wikipedia, the "M" in Athlon XP-M stand for mobile, which means laptop. Wikipedia also says that it is identical to the normal Athlon XP, expect it is running at lower spec. So yes for this mother board it works fine, I don't know about other motherboard, because I haven't test it.
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May 31, 2011 4:49:47 PM

its not a smart plan... it can be done but you'd need to be pretty hand with the soldiering iron .... and you would kill the laptop and most likely break anything usable while tacking it apart unless you were very experienced with laptop construction.

My advice buy a cheap amd based system ... you can build a pretty viable gaming rig for about 3 - 400 ( uk prices) if your savvy with what you buy the most expensive will be your GPU look to spend about a hundred on that ... you can buy in stages leaving the graphics card till last and using the onboard ( Ati graphics ) because its amd if budget it a major problem
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Anonymous
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a b D Laptop
January 17, 2013 9:22:55 PM

synthaside said:
its not a smart plan... it can be done but you'd need to be pretty hand with the soldiering iron .... and you would kill the laptop and most likely break anything usable while tacking it apart unless you were very experienced with laptop construction.

My advice buy a cheap amd based system ... you can build a pretty viable gaming rig for about 3 - 400 ( uk prices) if your savvy with what you buy the most expensive will be your GPU look to spend about a hundred on that ... you can buy in stages leaving the graphics card till last and using the onboard ( Ati graphics ) because its amd if budget it a major problem


Synthaside is quite wrong about the soldering iron - even in laptops the CPU is not soldered to the motherboard.

He may be right about buying a cheap new system...
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Anonymous
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a b D Laptop
January 17, 2013 10:02:24 PM

99.9% Chance of failure. 1. Can you take it off? In some cases. 2. Do the sockets match? Possibly. Intel has made at least 3 different sockets that are PGA478. They are not compatible with each other, even if they can fit. 3. If you answered yes to the above two, this is the part where you need to do a little research or most likely blow up either your mono or laptop CPU. Are the voltages same? I have not seen a case where a laptop CPU is compatible with a desktop mobo socket. 4. Finally, BIOS will most likely not recognize it. Sorry but you're better off buying a budget or mid-range processor instead. And in reply to afbd7687, some laptop CPUs ARE soldered on (BGA).
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January 17, 2013 10:06:54 PM

Who are you people & why are you commenting on a thread that's almost 2 years old...
READ THE TIME STAMPS. Let it die & don't reply.
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