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Dvd+-rw wont write rw disks

Tags:
  • DVD Writers
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
February 11, 2013 7:19:55 PM

Hello. I'm needing help in windows xp sp/3. I baught DVD-RW to make recovery Disc's and all applications keep saying no Disc in the drive. I ran Microsoft fixit and it said no burning capabilities. On the front of the drive it says HP Dvd writer/ Cd writer Combo. I can watch a DVD Movie using Video Lan. I have also enabled recording, I'm not computer smart so any and all help would be appreciated.

More about : dvd wont write disks

February 11, 2013 8:50:55 PM

What is the model? The label on the front of the case should be accurate, but sometimes the description doesn't match the actual model. If you aren't able to write DVDs to an optical drive, here are the most likely scenarios.

1. Drive is NOT DVD Multi write drive, but a DVD-ROM or DVD Combo (DVD-ROM + CDRW) only drive. check model, and google it to double check. Go to Computer -> Properties -> Device Manager -> check model name.
2. OS driver isn't installed correctly, or corrupted. Go to Computer -> Properties -> Device Manager, and remove driver -> restart.
3. Optical drive is defective. Nothing you can do about this except replacing it. It isn't cost effective to try to fix it.
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a b G Storage
February 11, 2013 9:02:04 PM

Hi :) 

In my shops we create a fair number of recovery discs...

Some of the recovery creating systems WILL NOT accept RW disc so we ALWAYS use standard write once DVD branded blank discs...

All the best Brett :) 
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February 12, 2013 2:49:07 PM

goonbar79 said:
What is the model? The label on the front of the case should be accurate, but sometimes the description doesn't match the actual model. If you aren't able to write DVDs to an optical drive, here are the most likely scenarios.

1. Drive is NOT DVD Multi write drive, but a DVD-ROM or DVD Combo (DVD-ROM + CDRW) only drive. check model, and google it to double check. Go to Computer -> Properties -> Device Manager -> check model name.
2. OS driver isn't installed correctly, or corrupted. Go to Computer -> Properties -> Device Manager, and remove driver -> restart.
3. Optical drive is defective. Nothing you can do about this except replacing it. It isn't cost effective to try to fix it.


Hi Goonbar,
Thanks for responding. The Computer is HP Media Center model m476n says that on the front. In properties it says Micrososft Windows XP Media Center Edition 2002 SP/3. I uninstalled the driver and the same one reinstalled. This is the Driver NEC DVD+RW ND 2100 AD, Next driver is ASUS CD S480/ AH
thanks again
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February 12, 2013 3:12:36 PM

shay_17 said:
Hi Goonbar,
Thanks for responding. The Computer is HP Media Center model m476n says that on the front. In properties it says Micrososft Windows XP Media Center Edition 2002 SP/3. I uninstalled the driver and the same one reinstalled. This is the Driver NEC DVD+RW ND 2100 AD, Next driver is ASUS CD S480/ AH
thanks again


First one looks like the model is a DVD writer (2nd one looks like cd-rom), which means it should write DVD-R without issue. If Device Manager shows "no problem", then it could be a defective drive OR corrupted files associated with running the device. First, I would test it out, with a testing software using a new, blank DVD-R media inside. Try ImgBurn http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=download. Download it, and select Discovery mode to test writing capabilities of the optical drive. You want to isolate the issue to if the drive fails during writing OR if the device is treated as a writer at all.

Also, to create HP recovery media without a working, physical optical drive, i recommend a "virtual" optical drive software. I use Daemon Tools Lite, which is free for home use http://www.daemon-tools.cc/eng/downloads. That way, you can save an image of the recovery disc (.iso file), and burn it into a real cd or dvd using Imgburn at a later time. Very easy to do, and if never used before, you can google it and get information easy too.
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February 13, 2013 2:47:58 AM

goonbar79 said:
First one looks like the model is a DVD writer (2nd one looks like cd-rom), which means it should write DVD-R without issue. If Device Manager shows "no problem", then it could be a defective drive OR corrupted files associated with running the device. First, I would test it out, with a testing software using a new, blank DVD-R media inside. Try ImgBurn http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=download. Download it, and select Discovery mode to test writing capabilities of the optical drive. You want to isolate the issue to if the drive fails during writing OR if the device is treated as a writer at all.

Also, to create HP recovery media without a working, physical optical drive, i recommend a "virtual" optical drive software. I use Daemon Tools Lite, which is free for home use http://www.daemon-tools.cc/eng/downloads. That way, you can save an image of the recovery disc (.iso file), and burn it into a real cd or dvd using Imgburn at a later time. Very easy to do, and if never used before, you can google it and get information easy too.


Hi Goonbar, I ended up buying CD-R,IMG Recognizes it. My question now is what does a virtual drive do and exactly how does a iso file work? I read some about daemon, but i still don't understand.

Thanks Again For All The Help
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February 13, 2013 12:26:32 PM

shay_17 said:
Hi Goonbar, I ended up buying CD-R,IMG Recognizes it. My question now is what does a virtual drive do and exactly how does a iso file work? I read some about daemon, but i still don't understand.

Thanks Again For All The Help


Virtual Optical Drive is sort of like installing a "fake" optical drive. Instead of physically installing an optical drive by opening up a pc, connecting cables and such, it is like "virtually" installing one. OS (Windows) treats is just like a real drive, so once the program is installed, and an additional optical drive (usually as BD-Rom) shows up on "My Computer" along with "real" optical drives.

Great thing about it is that you can "write" to this virtual drive, creating a "fake" disc, usually with extension of .iso (i.e. disc.iso). What it is doing is creating an exact "copy" of disc (cd, dvd, or even bluray) on a hard drive. With this file, you can burn it onto a real media at a later time using any software (i.e. ImgBurn).

You can then "Mount" the iso file, which is similar to inserting media, and "unmount" is like ejecting. There are pros and cons about doing this, but the biggest pro is being about to save "images" of discs on the hard drive, and able to make as many copies as you like.
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February 13, 2013 1:48:04 PM

goonbar79 said:
Virtual Optical Drive is sort of like installing a "fake" optical drive. Instead of physically installing an optical drive by opening up a pc, connecting cables and such, it is like "virtually" installing one. OS (Windows) treats is just like a real drive, so once the program is installed, and an additional optical drive (usually as BD-Rom) shows up on "My Computer" along with "real" optical drives.

Great thing about it is that you can "write" to this virtual drive, creating a "fake" disc, usually with extension of .iso (i.e. disc.iso). What it is doing is creating an exact "copy" of disc (cd, dvd, or even bluray) on a hard drive. With this file, you can burn it onto a real media at a later time using any software (i.e. ImgBurn).

You can then "Mount" the iso file, which is similar to inserting media, and "unmount" is like ejecting. There are pros and cons about doing this, but the biggest pro is being about to save "images" of discs on the hard drive, and able to make as many copies as you like.

Hi again. So does this mean it can be used to replace the operating system and could i burn on the dvd-rw disc's? I'm going to try what you suggested hope i don't mess it up. How can i tell what's on the disc and if everything went well? I'm sure not very computer smart.
Thanks Again
All suggestions and help is appreciated
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February 13, 2013 7:08:51 PM

goonbar79 said:
Virtual Optical Drive is sort of like installing a "fake" optical drive. Instead of physically installing an optical drive by opening up a pc, connecting cables and such, it is like "virtually" installing one. OS (Windows) treats is just like a real drive, so once the program is installed, and an additional optical drive (usually as BD-Rom) shows up on "My Computer" along with "real" optical drives.

Great thing about it is that you can "write" to this virtual drive, creating a "fake" disc, usually with extension of .iso (i.e. disc.iso). What it is doing is creating an exact "copy" of disc (cd, dvd, or even bluray) on a hard drive. With this file, you can burn it onto a real media at a later time using any software (i.e. ImgBurn).

You can then "Mount" the iso file, which is similar to inserting media, and "unmount" is like ejecting. There are pros and cons about doing this, but the biggest pro is being about to save "images" of discs on the hard drive, and able to make as many copies as you like.

Hi Goonbar,
I have no idea what and or where the files and folders are i need for the iso, and i have 1 cd-r to work with and i don't want to mess this up. Please in detail can you tell me how to find them.
Thanks Very Much
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