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How's this config for SolidWorks 2010?

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November 2, 2010 9:58:33 PM

Intel Core i5-760 Processor 2.8GHz 8MB Quad Core LGA1156
Gigabyte GA-P55M-UD2 Intel P55 Chipset LGA 1156 Model 950206/GP55MUD2
2x Crucial/Kingston/Micron 3GB 1333MHz DDR3
Samsung 320GB 16MB 7200RPM SATA II
SPARKLE GeForce GT220 1GB GDDR3 PCI-e Retail (Thinking of upgrading this, dunno to what..)
SAMSUNG DVD-RW SH-S223F x22 SATA Black OEM
Huntkey Hespers H401 Black/Silver Case 350W

Thank you guys.

More about : config solidworks 2010

November 2, 2010 10:44:49 PM

Where are you buying from?
November 2, 2010 10:50:54 PM

Could probably be done better with an AMD 1055T build. Doubt you'll be able to fit that ram setup in your mobo.
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November 3, 2010 5:09:54 AM

^+1
Solidworks, like most CAD software, is very cpu and memory hungry, so you would benefit from a hexacore (such as the AMD 1055T as mentioned above). I also recommend you get a 64 bit OS along with 8 GB of RAM.
November 3, 2010 9:25:25 AM

Thanks.

I'm buying from a local store in Israel, that offers recommended configs though you can chane anything.

According to the above comments this seems like a decent config:

AMD Phenomâ„¢ II Six Core 1055T 2.8GHz
Gigabyte GA-890XA-UD3
Kingston 3X2048MB (6GB) DDR3 1333MHz
Western Digital 1000GB SATA3 7200RPM
Gigabyte ATI Radeon HD 5770 1024MB
Optiarc SATA DVD


How's the Radeon in your view?

November 3, 2010 12:14:42 PM

You would have to get a workstation card to see any benefits in Solidworks, but they tend to be pretty expensive. If you'll be doing any moderate gaming on this machine, that card's good, but if all you're doing is Solidworks, you could go less.

You don't want a 3 channel ram kit; AMD cpus don't support 3 channel memory, so you'd be forced to run them in single channel mode (up to half the speed). You should get 4 x 2GB RAM.

Do you have the option to build yourself? You could save a lot of money if you went that route.
November 3, 2010 4:09:46 PM

pepperman said:
You would have to get a workstation card to see any benefits in Solidworks, but they tend to be pretty expensive. If you'll be doing any moderate gaming on this machine, that card's good, but if all you're doing is Solidworks, you could go less.

You don't want a 3 channel ram kit; AMD cpus don't support 3 channel memory, so you'd be forced to run them in single channel mode (up to half the speed). You should get 4 x 2GB RAM.

Do you have the option to build yourself? You could save a lot of money if you went that route.


Thanks for the reply,

I'm not sure I follow - if I get an AMD cpu I should get a DDR RAM (not DDR3)?
Is 4X2GB better than 2X4GB?
November 3, 2010 7:12:09 PM

You should get DDR3, but you should get a kit with either 2 or 4 modules (not 3).

2x4 is better since it allows you to upgrade without having to buy all new ram (you can instead supplement what you already have since you'll have two open dimms), though it tends to be more expensive, and you may never need to upgrade the ram.
November 3, 2010 10:03:58 PM

What would be a recommended mobo ?

Also, I'm looking for value and not best-in-class performance, so do the 6GB RAM & the Radeon fit my needs?
November 5, 2010 1:32:18 PM

Thanks for all your help pepperman. I'm set on the following system:

AMD Phenom II X6 1055T Processor 2.8GHz L3 6MB AM3 Box
Gigabyte GA-880GA-UD3H AMD 880G+SB850 AM3 DDR3 HDMI
Corsair 8GB Kit (4x2GB) XMS3 1600Mhz DDR3 CL9 Model C8G1600C9
Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black 3.5 64Mb SATA III WD1002FAEX
Gigabyte Radeon HD 5770 1024MB GDDR5 PCI-E Model R577UD1GD/GV-R577UD-1GD


I'm thinking of buying the parts and assembling myself, one more question though - what power supply do you recommend and what kind of cpu cooling?

Thanks again!
November 5, 2010 4:23:36 PM

This PSU will do fine: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You don't have a case listed: if you need one, take a look at the combos for the above mentioned PSU (assuming you're buying from newegg). If you don't like either of them, just pick one from the cases section. My philosophy on cases is that the person using the computer should pick it, since that's what they'll be looking at whenever they use their computer.

You don't need aftermarket cooling if you won't be OCing; the stock fan will be enough. If you do plan to OC, this would do nicely: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

!