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Clarification on SSD installation

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February 14, 2013 2:06:36 PM

Hello,

So I'm reading the instructions online for Trim here:

http://www.computing.net/howtos/show/solid-state-drive-...

I'm wondering, what is Trim mode, and why would I want to Disable system restore? Seems like a bad idea to me, no? Would I see that much of a degradation of speed?

BTW, I'm doing a clean install of Windows 7 on a Samsung 512GB 840 Pro.

a b G Storage
February 14, 2013 2:18:18 PM

I have a number of computers with SSDs in them and I have never disabled System Restore, nor have I had any problems with the drives. I've seen "tweaks" like this elsewhere, and I think they're overkill. You can disable System Restore if you want to, but I would not do it just for the SSD.
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Best solution

a c 523 G Storage
February 14, 2013 2:21:44 PM

neverknowu said:
I'm wondering, what is Trim mode,


TRIM is not a mode, it's a command. Here's a brief definition from Wikipedia:

In computing, a TRIM command allows an operating system to inform a solid-state drive (SSD) which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally. While TRIM is frequently spelled in capital letters, it is a command name, not an acronym. said:
In computing, a TRIM command allows an operating system to inform a solid-state drive (SSD) which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally. While TRIM is frequently spelled in capital letters, it is a command name, not an acronym.


and why would I want to Disable system restore? Seems like a bad idea to me, no? said:
and why would I want to Disable system restore? Seems like a bad idea to me, no?


Disabling system restore is done to recover drive space. It's a good idea if your SSD is 64GB or less.

Since you have a 512GB drive there's no reason for you to disable system restore.

Personally, if I had your drive I would only perform Steps 1, 4, & 12.

If you run WEI, Windows will automatically disable defrag on your SSD, which eliminates the need to do Step 5.
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February 14, 2013 2:29:54 PM

Thanks so much for the answers! Much appreciated.
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February 14, 2013 2:30:09 PM

Best answer selected by neverknowu.
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a c 353 G Storage
February 14, 2013 2:44:09 PM

Little added:
On virtual memory (page file) whith grater than 4 gigs ram, rather than disable it I just set Min/Max to the same value = 1024 mbs. This is what I use on both of my 8 gig and 16 gig systems. Savings is more than indicated. Windows sets this to up to 1.5 X ram. Guessing you have at least 8 gigs of ram so setting to 1024 mbs still saves about 11 Gigs (disabling saves 12 gigs).

On restore points; Myself do disable as Windows 7 and 8 have a excellent Imaging Back-up utility which is what I use to restore my systems from - Prefer it to using restore. Alternative is just take control by limiting disk space allowed for it. Generally windows allocates around 10 %. Each resore point takes 300 mbs (Windows7) so over time you will end up with the 5 gigs of restore points.

After Installation, download and run AS SSD - don NOT need to run the benchmark. Just open and look in upper left:
.. will identify SSD and FW (want to use lates FW
.. Driver if BIOS set to AHCI for install should be correct. what you do NOT want to see is pcide = Bad.
.. Alignment, should show OK (windows installation will properly align partition
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February 14, 2013 2:51:06 PM

RetiredChief said:
Little added:
On virtual memory (page file) whith grater than 4 gigs ram, rather than disable it I just set Min/Max to the same value = 1024 mbs. This is what I use on both of my 8 gig and 16 gig systems. Savings is more than indicated. Windows sets this to up to 1.5 X ram. Guessing you have at least 8 gigs of ram so setting to 1024 mbs still saves about 11 Gigs (disabling saves 12 gigs).

On restore points; Myself do disable as Windows 7 and 8 have a excellent Imaging Back-up utility which is what I use to restore my systems from - Prefer it to using restore. Alternative is just take control by limiting disk space allowed for it. Generally windows allocates around 10 %. Each resore point takes 300 mbs (Windows7) so over time you will end up with the 5 gigs of restore points.

After Installation, download and run AS SSD - don NOT need to run the benchmark. Just open and look in upper left:
.. will identify SSD and FW (want to use lates FW
.. Driver if BIOS set to AHCI for install should be correct. what you do NOT want to see is pcide = Bad.
.. Alignment, should show OK (windows installation will properly align partition


Do you set the Imaging Back-Up Utility to another hard drive on the system? I have not use that before.
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a c 353 G Storage
February 14, 2013 3:03:38 PM

Utility is located in Control Panel, backup. On left side you would select image your system drive. It will do a search for available drives to store the image - does NOT like system HDD. For good reason as the need to restore is because drive may NOT be availble for one reason or another.
Myself, I select the 2nd HDD in my system(s), then to play it safe I back up the file to my external Backup drive. No 2nd drive, then point to your external backup HDD. Alternative, which I do not recommend is to DVDs.

Once the image is completed you will be prompted to create a Bootable Repair DVD. Your choice as you can also use your windows Installation disk - just select repair, repair using an image file.

Complete time to recover using this is about 10->15 minutes. When you reboot you will be exactly where you were when you made the image. Used this method to move By system drive from a Crucial 256 gig M4 to a Samsung 840 Pro.
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February 14, 2013 3:16:38 PM

I have to be more dillagent about proper back ups. This is one of the reasons why I am doing a clean install right now. Thanks again, I will be looking into your valuable information there.
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