Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

$1,000 i5-760 First Build, few choices left. Please Help

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 5, 2010 12:38:12 AM

Hi, I think I've got a decent first build setup, but could use some opinions. I'd like to future proof a bit and keep some options open like SLI/Crossfire or a little bit of Overclocking, nothing major. I've included details below. I'd appreciate any input, thank you.

3 Questions:

1. Should I as a first time builder, with my usage, invest in SSD and seperate HDD?

2. I'm likely getting the HAF922 or Antec 902. Do I need a seperate CPU cooler, and hard drive cooler now?

3. I know I'll need some thermal paste, is there anything else? Do all of the components come with whats needed or do I still have to buy other connectors, etc.

Approximate Purchase Date: Within a month
Budget Range: 1000-1300 net, total after rebates, tax shipping etc.
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Multitasking with Quickbooks/internet/MS office apllications, Starcraft 2, maybe Crysis since I have the game but can't play it, minor photoshop/homevideo editing.
Overclocking: Maybe a little in the future
SLI or Crossfire: Maybe in the future
OS: Windows 7 64bit

These seem like popular components i'm using and if anyone happens to see any compatibility concerns I'd appreciate the heads up, thank you.

Here's the Build including ballpark prices from Newegg, just as a reference:
(i'll try to wait for Cyber Monday)

CASE: ??? $90 HAF 922
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
or
$120 Antec 902 (washable air filters seem nice)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

MOTHERBOARD: ??? Main difference seems like dual GPU 4x vs 8x
$110 Asus P7P55D E
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
or
$180 Asus P7P55D E Pro
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13-131-...

CPU: $210 i5 - 760

RAM ??? Chances I will need 16gb within several years, usage staying same?
$80 G.SKILL Ripjaws 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin 1333 1.5 V, Cas L 7 & 7-7-7-21
or
$180 G.SKILL Ripjaws 8gb(4x2gb) otherwise same as above
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hard drive
SSD $135 Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC064MAG-1G1 2.5" 64GB SATA III
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD $75 Samsung f3 spinpoint 1tb
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU Not sure which brand/type GTX-460 (good for Starcraft 2 and Crysis?)

PSU $90 (sale) Antec True power 750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU Cooler (if needed) $30 COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus "heatpipe direct contact"

Software Saw that Windows 7 system builders home edition 64 bit was recommended but not sure of the differences.
November 5, 2010 2:36:13 AM

SSD its good for any use, speeds up your computer overall.., its just retarded to have a FAST cpu, FAST ram, FAST GPU, and SLOW HD..
i have read around that intel stock coolers are not so good, and if you plan to OC, even a litle a 30 dollar Hyper 212+ its just perfect, i got 8 gig ram by error, and i dont belive its worth it, i have not yet reached 50% usage, and i open lots of stuff when doing work..
Starcraft its low demanding and a 460 will work fine, and SLi its good on it, so its not a bad choice..

i got the HAF and i wish i had some air filters, but im not sure i would spend the extra 30 box for them :-/, would just buy some air containers and take care of the dust from time to time, and keep everything cleaner..

im not a pro builder but thats my opinion

Best solution

November 5, 2010 2:54:36 AM
Share

"as a first time builder" no I would advise do not get a SSD. For one: you can always purchase one later, and two: internet; MS office; starcraft II; maybe crisis; does not need SSD to perform awesomely. For now just use the stock heatsink, and (Like kekek said) if you need one later purchase it if you are doing any high overclocking. Go with the G skill 4 GB ram for now, as you should do just fine with that. Get the Windows 7 OEM as its the cheapest (about $99). And only get the PSU if its still on sale, you don't really need 750W. If its not go with one a little cheaper or around the same price range.

And for the graphics card go with a Gigabyte Geforce GTX460 1Gb or a Radeon HD 5770. Im using the radeon right now with an AMD Athlon X4 955 and playing SCII on max settings flawlessly
Related resources
November 5, 2010 4:35:31 AM

kekkek said:
SSD its good for any use, speeds up your computer overall.., its just retarded to have a FAST cpu, FAST ram, FAST GPU, and SLOW HD..
i have read around that intel stock coolers are not so good, and if you plan to OC, even a litle a 30 dollar Hyper 212+ its just perfect, i got 8 gig ram by error, and i dont belive its worth it, i have not yet reached 50% usage, and i open lots of stuff when doing work..
Starcraft its low demanding and a 460 will work fine, and SLi its good on it, so its not a bad choice..

i got the HAF and i wish i had some air filters, but im not sure i would spend the extra 30 box for them :-/, would just buy some air containers and take care of the dust from time to time, and keep everything cleaner..

im not a pro builder but thats my opinion



Thanks, I appreciate your opinion. I will stick with the GTX-460 GPU, and yeah I like the removeable air filters and have seen mostly good reviews on the antec 902, even though I hear the filters are kind of a pain to get to but still better than nothing right.

For RAM I got the impression 4 gb should be fine but I tried looking up dual channel memory and am still unsure if it matters much if I have 2x2gb then add another 1x4gb and then another 1x4gb later on. Do mix and match RAM configurations affect performance much if I stick with the same brand and type?
November 5, 2010 5:56:47 AM

bloodymoth said:
"as a first time builder" no I would advise do not get a SSD. For one: you can always purchase one later, and two: internet; MS office; starcraft II; maybe crisis; does not need SSD to perform awesomely. For now just use the stock heatsink, and (Like kekek said) if you need one later purchase it if you are doing any high overclocking. Go with the G skill 4 GB ram for now, as you should do just fine with that. Get the Windows 7 OEM as its the cheapest (about $99). And only get the PSU if its still on sale, you don't really need 750W. If its not go with one a little cheaper or around the same price range.

And for the graphics card go with a Gigabyte Geforce GTX460 1Gb or a Radeon HD 5770. Im using the radeon right now with an AMD Athlon X4 955 and playing SCII on max settings flawlessly


Thanks for the advice. I didn't think about adding SSD later on. I like that option and will pass on it for now. I didn't think it would make much difference for my usage right now. Same goes for the CPU cooler.

I'll probably spring for the 750w though, unless too much power can be an issue?
November 5, 2010 7:01:16 AM

The only issue with too much power is that PSUs are normally less efficient when running low in their range. Your power usage will not be high . . . except when gaming.

The dilemna with your build is this: Protecting for future SLI is costing you a fair amount of money, yet the odds that you will ever need xfire/sli seem to be slim and none. You are a modest gamer with an i5 750, a 460, which is plenty to drive games using 1920 resolution (BTW, what resolution is your screen?).

Go with the inexpensive mobo, a 550W psu, use the stock cooler, and keep the rest of the money in your pocket. You'll have a great system, and you'll even be able to OC the 760 one bin or maybe two + turbo if you get adventursome.

November 5, 2010 1:36:36 PM

MrOsonice said:
...

I'll probably spring for the 750w though, unless too much power can be an issue?


You will still be good getting the 750W if that's what you want. Good luck!
November 5, 2010 6:07:12 PM

Twoboxer said:
The only issue with too much power is that PSUs are normally less efficient when running low in their range. Your power usage will not be high . . . except when gaming.

The dilemna with your build is this: Protecting for future SLI is costing you a fair amount of money, yet the odds that you will ever need xfire/sli seem to be slim and none. You are a modest gamer with an i5 750, a 460, which is plenty to drive games using 1920 resolution (BTW, what resolution is your screen?).

Go with the inexpensive mobo, a 550W psu, use the stock cooler, and keep the rest of the money in your pocket. You'll have a great system, and you'll even be able to OC the 760 one bin or maybe two + turbo if you get adventursome.


Great advice, thank you. Did not know that about power supply inefficiency, I will go with lower one. I wont worry about SLI or Crossfire either, if needed I'm sure I could always just upgrade the one GPU.

As for the mobo, comparing the features like cooling, OCing features (easier for noobs like me), power management and efficiency, etc. I'll probably spring for the better one unless those features are useless or dont apply to me at all.
November 5, 2010 6:10:15 PM

bloodymoth said:
You will still be good getting the 750W if that's what you want. Good luck!



Thanks. I think I'll shop the deals on Cyber Monday and see whats on sale and let that play a factor.
November 5, 2010 6:19:41 PM

I really appreciate all of the very helpful input (probably saved me several more hours of research.)

I think I can see the finish line. I've made changes using the suggestions which were a great guide.

Still have 2 questions though:

1. Those motherboard features, which vary between brands and models, are they very useful or just a marketing tactic?

2. Do all of these parts come with the necessary plugs/connections or are there other things I need aside from thermal paste?

Thanks again.
November 5, 2010 6:43:23 PM

MrOsonice said:
. . . if needed I'm sure I could always just upgrade the one GPU.
Exactly. Perhaps a few more dollars IF and WHEN you do it, and a lot less noise, heat if you can be satisfied by a single card.
MrOsonice said:
As for the mobo, comparing the features like cooling, OCing features (easier for noobs like me), power management and efficiency, etc. I'll probably spring for the better one unless those features are useless or dont apply to me at all.
First of all, let me say if you want to toy with going deeply into OCing, by all means get s more feature-rich board. But consider this:

You seem to be a normal gamer who wants a very comfortable and successful gaming system, and who has some interest in OCing. But with any of the Asus/Gigabyte boards you can easily get your cpu to (eg) 3.4GHz. The more expensive boards give more fine tuning controls over various parameters to coax a more reluctant cpu/memory to run 3.8GHz-4GHz or more and remain stable.

I predict YOU will NOT run your system 24/7 at those clocks due to heat, noise, and little-to-no need. While basic OCing is easy and fun, the use of those parameters requires knowledge that takes quite a bit of time to acquire.

The more expensive boards also have features that allow you to monitor things better and recover easier from repeated failed OC attempts.

Basic OCing is relatively easy, and fun. The extra heat generated by running a 2.67GHz cpu at 3.0GHz while still retaining Turbo is probably the most you will want to do 24/7.

If what I said sounds like you . . . as long as your mobo has the operating features you need, I'd reverse my earlier suggestion of sticking with the stock cooler, but stick with the less expensive mobo.
November 8, 2010 3:20:19 PM

Best answer selected by MrOsonice.
!