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Raid 0

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February 15, 2013 7:55:07 PM

What exactly is raid 0, and what does it do? I know it's for connecting two storage drives? What is connected? Two mechanical hard drives, a mechanical hard drive and an SSD, or two SSDs? Is it faster?

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a c 813 G Storage
February 15, 2013 10:33:54 PM

Two or more drives are working together as 1 larger faster drive. Data written to the drive is spread out across all the drives ( the bytes are actually split up) in the raid array. When data is read back in all the drives contribute their piece to recreate the whole. The overall speed of the read/writes is proportional to the number of drives in the array. Unfortunately if even one drive fails in the raid all the data is lost as there is no ability for the drives to recreate the missing piece that was stored on the defective drive. Backups are critical!

Drives in the array need to be partitioned the same size. a 750 and a 1000 would result in two 750 partitions and raid0'd to create a 1500 sized drive. Drives in the array also should be the same speed as the array can easily degrade if one drive is much slower than the rest. its is highly recommended that drives in the array be the exact same make, model, and firmware revision. Lastly not all drives are raid compatible, do your research before you buy.
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February 16, 2013 4:34:43 AM

popatim said:
Two or more drives are working together as 1 larger faster drive. Data written to the drive is spread out across all the drives ( the bytes are actually split up) in the raid array. When data is read back in all the drives contribute their piece to recreate the whole. The overall speed of the read/writes is proportional to the number of drives in the array. Unfortunately if even one drive fails in the raid all the data is lost as there is no ability for the drives to recreate the missing piece that was stored on the defective drive. Backups are critical!

Drives in the array need to be partitioned the same size. a 750 and a 1000 would result in two 750 partitions and raid0'd to create a 1500 sized drive. Drives in the array also should be the same speed as the array can easily degrade if one drive is much slower than the rest. its is highly recommended that drives in the array be the exact same make, model, and firmware revision. Lastly not all drives are raid compatible, do your research before you buy.

I've heard of people putting a hard drive and an SSD in Raid 0 to make the hard drive run faster. What do you say about this?
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a c 104 G Storage
February 16, 2013 2:07:21 PM

yesthis said:
I've heard of people putting a hard drive and an SSD in Raid 0 to make the hard drive run faster. What do you say about this?


The only thing that will happen in that situation is that the regular drive will cause the SSD to be slower. Sure, it would be faster than a single regular hard drive, just because of the RAID 0, but it will be slower than just using an SSD.

It's like welding a Corvette to a Yugo to make it go faster. Sure, the Yugo will be faster, but the Vette will be slower if it's just left alone.
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a c 342 G Storage
February 16, 2013 4:42:22 PM

OP, you mention RAID0 using an HDD and an SSD. For that, hang-the-9 has given you the right answer - bad idea.

Maybe you have confused the story, though. It is possible to install both an SSD and a HDD in a machine, and then set up the Operating System to establish a chunk of cache memory on the SSD that temporarily holds copies of parts of the HDD's contents. Attempts to use data from the HDD are first routed to the SSD that is MUCH faster; IF it happens that the SSD has that info, you get it faster that way than going to the HDD. It is just another version of using fast cache RAM to make a slower device (the HDD) appear faster for some operations. Still, this technique has limitations on what can be accomplished, and when it is suitable.
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