Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Identifying faulty component

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 5, 2010 4:10:52 PM

Hi,

I'm trying to troubleshoot a new system that I'm breadboarding but so far have been unable to succeed.

I've followed what is suggested here :

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-ste...

and have rechecked several times.

With only PSU and CPU installed, no beeps are heard and no fans are turning . If I short the power switch connector on the mobo , fans start and stop continuously.

PSU passed the paperclip test .

I tried the breadboarding routine with a brand new different mobo with the same negative results.

Is there a way to pinpoint the cause : PSU or CPU ?

November 5, 2010 6:09:37 PM

Remember to hear any beeps, you need the PC speaker connected.

You can try the PSU in another system and if it works fine, then the is nothing wrong with the PSU. Otherwise, the other system probably won't start up.
a b à CPUs
November 5, 2010 6:17:53 PM

^What kureme means is you need a case (or system) speaker to hear anything. Hooking up a regular speaker to the build won't do anything. The case speaker is a very small speaker that plugs directly into the motherboard. Very few cases/boards have one standard now days, so unless you got one by itself (about $5), you likely don't have one.

I'm hoping you're not hoping to get anything from just having the PSU and CPU installed. At minimum (assuming onboard graphics) you need to have a stick of RAM as well to see anything.

Also, how are you sure it's not the board? Really, about the only thing you can do at this point (without knowing specific parts or details on what's happened at various points in troubleshooting) to avoid just RMAing parts is to try your PSU/CPU in other build. If you install the PSU in a previously working build, the PSU isn't work right. That's really the only way the cause for sure.
Related resources
November 5, 2010 9:37:28 PM

MadAdmiral said:
^What kureme means is you need a case (or system) speaker to hear anything. Hooking up a regular speaker to the build won't do anything. The case speaker is a very small speaker that plugs directly into the motherboard. Very few cases/boards have one standard now days, so unless you got one by itself (about $5), you likely don't have one.

I do have a small speaker plugged into the mobo.

I'm hoping you're not hoping to get anything from just having the PSU and CPU installed. At minimum (assuming onboard graphics) you need to have a stick of RAM as well to see anything.

I was hoping to get at least a series of long beeps indicating a memory problem.


Also, how are you sure it's not the board? Really, about the only thing you can do at this point (without knowing specific parts or details on what's happened at various points in troubleshooting) to avoid just RMAing parts is to try your PSU/CPU in other build. If you install the PSU in a previously working build, the PSU isn't work right. That's really the only way the cause for sure.


I have the same problem using the same PSU and CPU but another brand new mobo from a different manufacturer. I imagine that in order to get two DOA mobos at the same time one would have to be terribly unlucky.
a b à CPUs
November 5, 2010 10:30:51 PM

That is true, but it's almost unheard of to get a DOA CPU (or a DOA quality PSU, which I'm not assuming). However, just testing a new board won't let you know which is causing the problem. You need to get a build you know works. It doesn't matter if it's incompatible with the CPU, just swap out the PSUs. If it works, RMA the CPU. If it doesn't, RMA the PSU. Or both.

It may also help if we knew what parts you were using. Some parts have known issues that we may be able to point you to an easy fix.
November 8, 2010 6:26:37 PM

MadAdmiral said:
That is true, but it's almost unheard of to get a DOA CPU (or a DOA quality PSU, which I'm not assuming). However, just testing a new board won't let you know which is causing the problem. You need to get a build you know works. It doesn't matter if it's incompatible with the CPU, just swap out the PSUs. If it works, RMA the CPU. If it doesn't, RMA the PSU. Or both.

It may also help if we knew what parts you were using. Some parts have known issues that we may be able to point you to an easy fix.


I tried with a known working power supply and the results were exactly the same; so I guess I'll be changing the CPU.

For the record the parts are as follows:

board: ASUS P7P55D-E LX

processor: Intel Core I5 760

power supply : Corsair TX650

Thanks for your input.
!