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Recommended psu for i7 2600k

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January 31, 2011 4:08:39 AM

Hello,
Im trying to figure out how much power I need for a computer that im potentially going to build. I will be using this computer for gaming and overclocking

The specs are as follows:

Intel i7 2600k 3.40ghz
Asus Sabertooth P67 motherboard
Corsair 6gb triple channel Ram
ATI Radeon HD 6970
1 TB Hitachi Hard Drive
OCZ 60gb Solid State Drive
ThermalTake Big Water 760i Liquid cooling kit

I was planning on purchasing a 650watt power supply but im not sure. please help :/ 

More about : recommended psu 2600k

a b ) Power supply
January 31, 2011 4:41:46 AM

650w would be cutting it a bit close. It would probably run (due to the fact that the 2600K uses minimal power, even at OC), but it's not preferable to take so much power from your PSU. I'd recommend a more powerful PSU, like:

Gigabyte ODIN 720W (still a bit small, but OK)
Corsair TX750W
Huntkey X7 900W (great for future upgrades/OC, and provides a modular cabling system)

These are all good PSU's, and any one of them would be a decent choice made.

Pick wisely, young liboiluvsps2, and be with you, the power will... :D 
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January 31, 2011 5:00:50 AM

Right ^^ A branded 750 or + psu.
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January 31, 2011 8:40:23 AM

All the reviews I've seen is stock i5 2600k only requires about 70W load.

Why would you need a 750W PSU to run liboiluvsp2's system? A 450W supply would easily suffice.
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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
January 31, 2011 8:48:49 AM

A triple channel RAM kit won't help out your Sandy Bridge CPU, which only supports dual channel. If you already have the triple channel kit, just buy another stick of that same type of RAM with the same timings and voltage. That way you'll have 8GB filling all four RAM slots.

Speaking of voltage, for maximum compatibility stick with 1.5v spec RAM kits.

Most quality power supplies are at their most efficient when they are at 50% load or more. As long as your peak system power need is lower than the peak power output of the power supply, you'll be fine. During benchmarking at this site, overclocked Sandy Bridge systems were peaking in the low 400s for wattage with the average being around 170W. I don't know for sure how much wattage that liquid cooling unit will need, but I wouldn't think it would use more than 100W or so.

I'd go with the SeaSonic X-Series 750W recommended by Randomacts. It's an excellent quality unit. I bought the 560W X-Series for my Sandy Bridge overclock/game system, but I don't have a liquid-cooling system, and I know I won't do SLI/CF.

My system:
Intel Core i5-2500K processor
Intel stock cooler (had a Prolimatech Megahalems Rev.B but its bracket shorted against the case's mainboard tray)
Gelid GC-Extreme thermal compound
ASRock P67 Pro3 mainboard
G.Skill Ripjaws X 12GB DDR3-1600 CL9 memory (one 8GB kit and one 4GB kit, all four slots full)
Palit GTX 570 Sonic 1280MB video card
Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB SATA hard drive
Samsung SH-223C SATA DVD burner
SeaSonic X-Series SS-560KM 560W power supply
Cooler Master HAF 912 case w/ six Scythe S-FLEX SFF21F fans
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January 31, 2011 8:53:28 AM

You need to consider the power usage vs. efficiency of the system. As a result a 450W would run, but wouldn't leave any overhead, which would be quite damage for the PSU. I wouldn't really want to get above 80% usage, but each to his own.

However I do think a 650W will suffice, a 750W will give you some more headroom, possibly even enough for a future upgrade to x-fire with a lower end card (but you'd really want an 850W for that). It just doesn't seem needed to me, even with OCing, a well made 650W will be fine.
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a b ) Power supply
January 31, 2011 11:57:12 AM

doive1231 said:
All the reviews I've seen is stock i5 2600k only requires about 70W load.

Why would you need a 750W PSU to run liboiluvsp2's system? A 450W supply would easily suffice.


Where did you see a i5-2600K review?? LOL

450w? Seriously, not with a 6970 and a overclock dude. I'd recommend a 620w for a single HD6970.

Oh and you don't want a triple channel ram kit, only a dual channel.
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February 2, 2011 6:41:37 PM

Toxxyc said:
650w would be cutting it a bit close. It would probably run (due to the fact that the 2600K uses minimal power, even at OC), but it's not preferable to take so much power from your PSU. I'd recommend a more powerful PSU, like:

Gigabyte ODIN 720W (still a bit small, but OK)
Corsair TX750W
Huntkey X7 900W (great for future upgrades/OC, and provides a modular cabling system)

These are all good PSU's, and any one of them would be a decent choice made.

Pick wisely, young liboiluvsps2, and be with you, the power will... :D 




WOW thanks alot guys I greatly appreciate it. Im new to forums so im still getting used to it.
and Toxxyc haha thanks alot but now my hopes in getting the new Sandy Bridge i7 has been compromised now that intel discovered an error in P67 motherboards :/ 

What would be a great replacement for this i7? Around the same price.
or should I wait until they release the fixed i7?

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February 2, 2011 6:44:03 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
A triple channel RAM kit won't help out your Sandy Bridge CPU, which only supports dual channel. If you already have the triple channel kit, just buy another stick of that same type of RAM with the same timings and voltage. That way you'll have 8GB filling all four RAM slots.

Speaking of voltage, for maximum compatibility stick with 1.5v spec RAM kits.

Most quality power supplies are at their most efficient when they are at 50% load or more. As long as your peak system power need is lower than the peak power output of the power supply, you'll be fine. During benchmarking at this site, overclocked Sandy Bridge systems were peaking in the low 400s for wattage with the average being around 170W. I don't know for sure how much wattage that liquid cooling unit will need, but I wouldn't think it would use more than 100W or so.

I'd go with the SeaSonic X-Series 750W recommended by Randomacts. It's an excellent quality unit. I bought the 560W X-Series for my Sandy Bridge overclock/game system, but I don't have a liquid-cooling system, and I know I won't do SLI/CF.

My system:
Intel Core i5-2500K processor
Intel stock cooler (had a Prolimatech Megahalems Rev.B but its bracket shorted against the case's mainboard tray)
Gelid GC-Extreme thermal compound
ASRock P67 Pro3 mainboard
G.Skill Ripjaws X 12GB DDR3-1600 CL9 memory (one 8GB kit and one 4GB kit, all four slots full)
Palit GTX 570 Sonic 1280MB video card
Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB SATA hard drive
Samsung SH-223C SATA DVD burner
SeaSonic X-Series SS-560KM 560W power supply
Cooler Master HAF 912 case w/ six Scythe S-FLEX SFF21F fans




Really? wow I didnt know that.
How did you find this out? I figured that new i7s would be compatible with triple channel.
Also, getting dual channel 8gb ram would be cheaper than triple channel i assume but now i have to decide on another i7 since they temporarily discontinued sandy bridge mother boards due to their error with the P67 chip set.
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February 2, 2011 6:44:55 PM

Or should I look toward an i5?
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February 12, 2011 4:19:32 PM

Best answer selected by liboiluvsps2.
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March 14, 2011 1:11:31 PM

liboiluvsps2 said:
Best answer selected by liboiluvsps2.

n
nNothing wrong with the i7 so why not get what you want. I had the bigwater kit. Keep in mind it's really only good for a single CPU and its performance degrades after being turned on due to the heat all being trapped inside the case with the small radiator. If you plan to up voltages such as overclock, look into better cooling. Best of luck.
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March 31, 2011 5:33:18 AM

My Killawatt meter showed almost 500 watts with a 5ghz 2600K and two GTX 560s under 3dMark. 350 watts stressing just the CPU.

A whole lot better than my i7 930.

I'm on a 750 watt PS.
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April 12, 2011 2:58:15 PM

I run a i7-2600K oc to 4.7. 2 GTX570's oc'ed, and 8gb RAM. H70 cooler and a couple hdd and 2 ssd. My computer at the wall when folding BIGADV and both GPU's is 590W (not corrected for PSU loss). So do the math. I have it on a HX 850 Corsair PSU and it runs flawlessly! Still leaves room for one more GTX 570.
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