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Is this a good gaming build?

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November 12, 2010 1:39:45 AM

ASUS P7P55D-E-PRO Socket 1156 Motherboard (DDR3 Memory)

Intel Core i5 650 3.2GHz Socket 1156 Processor w/Fan

22X Dual Layer SATA Dual Layer Black DVD Burner OEM

Seagate Barracuda / 500GB / SATA/300 / 16MB / 7200RPM / OEM / Hard Drive

Crucial 4GB Kit (2x2GB) 1333MHz DDR3 PC3-10600

Zotac GeForce GTX 460 Synergy PCI-E 2.0 Video Card

Windows 7 Premium

Any comments??? Suggestions?

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a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2010 1:44:24 AM

I'd swap the hdd for a spinpoint f3, theyre faster. Also consider the i5-750 cpu, its $35 more but a quad core instead of dual core. Everything else looks good. Also im nut sure about your ram, if its not a lot more try switching to a something like g.skill or corsair ram.
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2010 2:41:39 AM

+1. I'd go for the quad as well, and I'd personally not use Crucial. They're hit and miss lately, IMO. As for the Seagate, it's also an excellent drive. I'm not sure how much faster the F3 is, if any, but they're both really solid for mechanicals. Looks solid though.
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a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2010 2:46:59 AM

Seeing as it hasn't been said make sure that whatever ram kit you buy supports 1.65V. You don't want to buy 1.7 or 1.85v ram as that requires a higher voltage then what Intel can safely supply.
November 12, 2010 11:58:11 AM

jack_attack said:
+1. I'd go for the quad as well, and I'd personally not use Crucial. They're hit and miss lately, IMO. As for the Seagate, it's also an excellent drive. I'm not sure how much faster the F3 is, if any, but they're both really solid for mechanicals. Looks solid though.

Well, thank you for the input. I've never constructed a PC before, but I have had a lot of experience with computers and have a pretty general idea of how they work. It'll be my first home-brewed PC and I am pretty excited to get involved in it. :)  Again, thank you for the input, brother. It means a lot to me.
November 12, 2010 12:00:23 PM

4745454b said:
Seeing as it hasn't been said make sure that whatever ram kit you buy supports 1.65V. You don't want to buy 1.7 or 1.85v ram as that requires a higher voltage then what Intel can safely supply.

Good to know. I wouldn't want to short out a circuit in the CPU because I was stupid and chose a higher voltage RAM. I want to keep it simple, so less voltage = less power the CPU clocks out resulting in a faster performance. Makes sense. Thanks, brother.
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2010 2:38:35 PM

Quote:
so less voltage = less power the CPU clocks out resulting in a faster performance.


Not quite. It has more to do with that fact that the Intel boards has the pins on the motherboards themselves, and they are TINY. To much voltage across tiny pins = literal shorting out of the board/CPU. You can run the higher voltage ram on the AMD systems because the pins are fatter. (YAY! Lets hear it for chubbiness!)
a b B Homebuilt system
November 12, 2010 10:15:19 PM

Love me some fatties.

I mean. Wait. Fat RAM contacts. That's what I meant.
!