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1st time building, need recommendations for a fast all-around PC

Hello,

I am looking forward to build my first PC. Please recommend a good configuration for a home versatile machine with the following features in mind:
- Limited gaming, lots of photo and video editing/conversion/encoding
- Some Java development
- Would like to use i5-760 (or similar)
- USB3, eSATA, FireWire
- SSD as a boot drive
- Would like to use two monitors
- DVD burner is not needed
- Would like to stay around $600 (without monitor(s))

Your help is much appreciated
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about time building recommendations fast around
  1. Perhaps eloborate on apps/software used?

    Premiere Pro may leverage on GPU and may well be worth it depending on size of projects but Pinnacle/Vegas is CPU/RAM bound

    So
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advice
  2. Hmm either way no gains via GPU acceleration/tech

    $532AR


    else just hit

    $95AR Free Ship GTS 450
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130572&cm_re=GTS_450-_-14-130-572-_-Product

    Actually Icrontic got excellent results X6 + MPE in CS5 Premiere and u dun have to deal with mobos that cost an arm and a leg hehe
    A case for GPU computing: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and the Mercury Playback Engine
    http://tech.icrontic.com/articles/reviews/a-case-for-gpu-computing-adobe-premiere-pro-cs5-and-the-mercury-playback-engine/
    Quote:
    This project consists of compressed 640×480 video footage. These small video files were being eaten alive by the massive 1090T hexa-core processor and 8GB of RAM. Premiere Pro CS5′s increased performance with multi-core systems coupled with bleeding fast hardware will make fast work of any simple projects such as this, not giving the GPU enough work to really make a difference. These results do suggest that if you’re editing small-time video footage, you will not benefit much from using Mercury Playback.
  3. mrvadims said:
    Hello,

    I am looking forward to build my first PC. Please recommend a good configuration for a home versatile machine with the following features in mind:
    - Limited gaming, lots of photo and video editing/conversion/encoding
    - Some Java development
    - Would like to use i5-760 (or similar)
    - USB3, eSATA, FireWire
    - SSD as a boot drive
    - Would like to use two monitors
    - DVD burner is not needed
    - Would like to stay around $600 (without monitor(s))

    Your help is much appreciated
    For your photo and video editing and conversion, you may want to consider an AMD X6 build. With your budget, Intel isn't the best path (esp if you want an SSD). Also, LGA 1156 motherboards don't commonly support USB 3.0 and SATA 3 IIRC. For "limited" gaming, I think one graphics card will suffice (perhaps a 6850), but that depends on your monitor setup (and resolutions). Assuming you're buying in the US, this combo and this combo are good places to start.
    Do you need a case? When do you plan to buy?
  4. Firewire sucks dude, you dont need firewire...
  5. batuchka said:
    Perhaps eloborate on apps/software used?

    Premiere Pro may leverage on GPU and may well be worth it depending on size of projects but Pinnacle/Vegas is CPU/RAM bound

    So
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advice


    I am using Adobe suite of products for image and video editing (photoshop and premiere). I am also using various video tools to rip and (re)encode movies.
  6. blackjellognomes said:
    For your photo and video editing and conversion, you may want to consider an AMD X6 build. With your budget, Intel isn't the best path (esp if you want an SSD). Also, LGA 1156 motherboards don't commonly support USB 3.0 and SATA 3 IIRC. For "limited" gaming, I think one graphics card will suffice (perhaps a 6850), but that depends on your monitor setup (and resolutions). Assuming you're buying in the US, this combo and this combo are good places to start.
    Do you need a case? When do you plan to buy?



    Thank you, very much for your suggestions. I would prefer to stay with Intel chip, if possible, even though I understand it may be a bit more money. I had some bad experience with AMD before. I already have an 19" monitor (which I am going to use as second monitor) and planning to purchase a 24" one to be my primary monitor.
  7. reaper2794 said:
    Firewire sucks dude, you dont need firewire...


    I know :-( However, I have lots of family movies on miniDV tapes that I still need to transfer to my PC from an old camcorder.
  8. Best answer
    mrvadims said:
    Thank you, very much for your suggestions. I would prefer to stay with Intel chip, if possible, even though I understand it may be a bit more money. I had some bad experience with AMD before. I already have an 19" monitor (which I am going to use as second monitor) and planning to purchase a 24" one to be my primary monitor.
    I'm not sure if you understand what "a bit more money" would be. In video editing/encoding/etc, a 1055T's performance will be between that of an i7-950 ($295, 4C/8T) and that of an i7-970 ($880, 6C/12T). The 1055T ($180, 6C/6T) should consistently outperform the i7-960 ($580, 4C/8T) as well, but we're ignoring that chip because the 140Mhz bump up from the 950 is definitely not worth the price difference. This is because physical cores are more effective that threads. So, if you want an Intel chip, you'd either be paying $115 more for 5-10% less performance (from the i7-950), or $700 more for 10-15% more performance (from the i7-970)... if we let the 1055T be our point of reference.
  9. blackjellognomes said:
    I'm not sure if you understand what "a bit more money" would be. In video editing/encoding/etc, a 1055T's performance will be between that of an i7-950 ($295, 4C/8T) and that of an i7-970 ($880, 6C/12T). The 1055T ($180, 6C/6T) should consistently outperform the i7-960 ($580, 4C/8T) as well, but we're ignoring that chip because the 140Mhz bump up from the 950 is definitely not worth the price difference. This is because physical cores are more effective that threads. So, if you want an Intel chip, you'd either be paying $115 more for 5-10% less performance (from the i7-950), or $700 more for 10-15% more performance (from the i7-970)... if we let the 1055T be our point of reference.


    Thank you for a valuable insight
  10. Best answer selected by mrvadims.
  11. This topic has been closed by Maziar
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