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Real News on the Japanese Reactors would be nice

http://www.smh.com.au/national/gillard-defends-insensitive-rudd-20110313-1bt24.html

Despite getting into a bit of hot water at home over his comments, it appears Foreign Minsister Kevin Rudd seems to be the only politician on planet earth who has the ballz to ask the question directly ...

"What is the status of those reactors ... what help do you need?

The news coming from all sources appears to be getting more innaccurate ... mainly due to the fact that the Japanese Government are not telling anyone anything.

Is this because the company who owns the reactors don't want to tell us anything?

No news is good news?

I don't think so.

This whole issue smells.

News reporters are now inventing stories to fill the gaps ... and idiots are uploading doom video on the tube ... in the last 24 hours nothing new has been passed on ... only rumour.

Those stories are creating confusion and anxiety.

The Japanese Govenment needs to step up to the plate and take a few swings.

/end rant
82 answers Last reply
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  1. I agree 100%! A clear, informative statement from either the company who operates the plant or the government is needed to parlay fears. Even if the situation isn't ideal, the more information on it, the better so the people around it know what is going on and so other governments know what to send/offer in terms of help.
  2. The japanese are in a bit of a pickle with regards to releasing news, many people exaggerate things and so they run the risk of things being sensationalised(like the explosions) and people panicking or they do not tell enough and have a general complacency around the issue. Seeing as the word nuclear is mentioned I don't think people are going to be complacent so the less panic the better as being frank is not a good idea with us laymen sometimes.

    If the media of the world were more controlled if that is the right word then it might be better but accuracy is not a strong point. Ratings and "news" are more important so I doubt if more openness was used things would be reported well.
  3. By controlled, I think you are getting at having a set of standards that all news organizations must adhere to? I believe that there are standards now, but they are a bit "loose," i.e. not as stringent as they should be. I'm all for freedom of the press, but there should be standards on what can be reported and when in certain instances like this.
  4. Chernobyl times 6...
  5. The cooling ponds are more of a worry.
  6. Reynod said:
    The cooling ponds are more of a worry.

    You are exactly right. All we have right now is speculation that spent fuel rods that react too slowly to power the plant are being exposed, reacting just fast enough to build heat faster than it can be released, and possibly even beginning to vaporize. And if that gets to full force, you have a "Chernoble" that looks like a torch rather than a firecracker.
  7. Oldmangamer_73 said:
    No, Chernobyl had no containment vessel around it's reactor. Chernobyl's core melted through the floor producing the infamous "elephant foot". This can't happen here. The vessel is designed to withstand 5000° C. The core, even if "melted down" will burn at 3000° C. So worst case scenario is a giant lead building around the plant eventually, but nowhere near the amount of radiation release. A fraction of it actually. Remember, Chernobyl's core was exploded up and out from the plant in all directions. That can't happen with the containment vessels in this case.


    Indeed. The Soviets cut a lot of corners on Chernobyl and various other plants to save money and time at the expense of safety. As mentioned, there has been some radiation release and there could be more from the actual reactors themselves, but it will be nowhere near the amount of radiation released from Chernobyl, i.e. a huge radiation cloud that will travel throughout Asia and such. As reynod and crashman mentioned, the big concern are the cooling ponds where the spent fuel is stored. If cooling capabilities are lost in these ponds there is nothing to stop the radiation emitting from the spent fuel, whether it is on fire or not. That should be the primary concern right now for sure.
  8. buwish said:
    If cooling capabilities are lost in these ponds there is nothing to stop the radiation emitting from the spent fuel, whether it is on fire or not. That should be the primary concern right now for sure.
    Genius! The question I have is, if there is no "nuclear fire", where are the heavy elements they keep detecting coming from?
  9. Oldmangamer_73 said:
    I saw a report last night (Eastern US time) that a power line to the plant was nearly complete. If that's true they can get the pumps running again. Good news.
    I saw a report that the backup-generators were taken out by the tsunami. Big Question: If you're building near the ocean, why would your backup generators be within reach of a tsunami?
  10. Oldmangamer_73 said:
    Excellent question!

    It appears that GE designed a really good quake proof plant for them. It would seem that the Japanese miscalculated/screwed up in deciding to build it on the ocean. You're right about the generators. Couldn't you remotely locate them in the mountains and just run power lines? Expensive yes, but much more reliable.
    I think they wanted them local to the plant to avoid issues with torn power lines. My thought would be to put them on top of the plant instead of at ground level. Yes, you have to pump the diesel up to the tanks, but that would have been a small price to pay for the added security.
  11. Dailytech's Jason Mick has an opinion piece on the fear-mongering news stories going around, esp. the ones by MSNBC. http://www.dailytech.com/EDITORIAL+MSNBCcom+Report+on+US+Nuclear+Risks+Features+Many+Flaws/article21150.htm

    Unfortunately Jason's statistics that he uses to contradict those of MSNBC are also flawed, esp. the one about a meltdown every 750 years for each reactor. Should have been the chances of a meltdown for all reactors, not just one. Nevertheless, I totally agree with him that the alarmists and fear-mongerers are having a field day with this one, and it'll set back by a considerable amount, an essential and statistically safer form of energy that coal or oil (which kill more people albeit at a slower rate).
  12. Oldmangamer_73 said:
    For days CNN et al have been putting anti-nuke power activist on TV and touting them as "nuclear experts". I've googled severl of these people and they have clear track records going back decades as anti-nuclear activists. Once again, a news network trying to make news rather than report it.
    Look, the hippy leftovers have a vision of a world that is nothing more than a group of communes. The only problem is that communes get some of their supplies, such as tools, from the outside industrial world. Their de-industrialization goals can only end with lives that are nasty, brutish, and short.
  13. Crashman said:
    Genius! The question I have is, if there is no "nuclear fire", where are the heavy elements they keep detecting coming from?


    If they aren't on fire, which has happened a few times though and released quite a bit of radiation, you'll get a release of radiation from steam due to the water they were dumping in the pools and the reactors themselves. Plus, another way to look at it would be like so: Imagine taking one of these spent fuel rods and placing it in a sealed room with just you in the room (I don't recommend taking a used fuel rod or sitting in a room with one). It may not light up, but it sure as heck will be emitting tons of radiation. If you had Geigerer counter, it would be going nuts and surely, you'd probably have radiation poisoning in minutes. My point is that the pools are sealed like the rest of reactor and with the spent rods uncovered, you'll get radiation seeping off of them like none other.

    That's my theory anyhow. I'm not a nuclear engineer or a physicist (far from it, actually), so I'm probably very wrong, but it seems plausible.

    This incident though does not change my opinion of nuclear power. As mentioned, a lot of these so called experts that the networks have had on are indeed against nuclear power (I checked as well) and while they are entitled to their opinions, their fear mongering hasn't worked on me and I hope not on others. I think that nuclear power is the future or at least until we can come up with some other form of energy creation, i.e. fusion power, which actually is being worked on in Europe in the form of a small-experimental reactor. I've lived in the "shadow" of a nuclear power plant my whole life and nothing bad has ever happened to me or anyone I know because of it, which is why I'm in favor of nuclear power (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaSalle_County_Nuclear_Generating_Station).

    If you run a plant right and follow through on all safety measures, it is my opinion that they are very sefficientffecient in comparison to traditional forms of power generation (unless you build it in an area open to natural disasters and such).

    In regard to Japan, it seems like things are keeping the status quo or improving slightly, which is good news. Hopefully they can gain control of the reactors in the coming days-weeks and put this incident to rest. However, I'm curious to know if they'll be forced to build Chernsarcophagus'saphagouses around a few of the reactors if the cores indeed melted down.
  14. buwish said:
    If they aren't on fire, which has happened a few times though and released quite a bit of radiation, you'll get a release of radiation from steam due to the water they were dumping in the pools and the reactors themselves. Plus, another way to look at it would be like so: Imagine taking one of these spent fuel rods and placing it in a sealed room with just you in the room (I don't recommend taking a used fuel rod or sitting in a room with one). It may not light up, but it sure as heck will be emitting tons of radiation. If you had Geigerer counter, it would be going nuts and surely, you'd probably have radiation poisoning in minutes. My point is that the pools are sealed like the rest of reactor and with the spent rods uncovered, you'll get radiation seeping off of them like none other.

    That's my theory anyhow. I'm not a nuclear engineer or a physicist (far from it, actually), so I'm probably very wrong, but it seems plausible.

    This incident though does not change my opinion of nuclear power. As mentioned, a lot of these so called experts that the networks have had on are indeed against nuclear power (I checked as well) and while they are entitled to their opinions, their fear mongering hasn't worked on me and I hope not on others. I think that nuclear power is the future or at least until we can come up with some other form of energy creation, i.e. fusion power, which actually is being worked on in Europe in the form of a small-experimental reactor. I've lived in the "shadow" of a nuclear power plant my whole life and nothing bad has ever happened to me or anyone I know because of it, which is why I'm in favor of nuclear power (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaSalle_County_Nuclear_Generating_Station).

    If you run a plant right and follow through on all safety measures, it is my opinion that they are very sefficientffecient in comparison to traditional forms of power generation (unless you build it in an area open to natural disasters and such).

    In regard to Japan, it seems like things are keeping the status quo or improving slightly, which is good news. Hopefully they can gain control of the reactors in the coming days-weeks and put this incident to rest. However, I'm curious to know if they'll be forced to build Chernsarcophagus'saphagouses around a few of the reactors if the cores indeed melted down.
    I understand that you can irradiate things with the spit-off particles. That would lead to radioactive...lots of things, but stuff like Cesium wouldn't just magically appear. For that to happen, the metal itself (rather than its subatomic particles) must escape containment.
  15. Yes your quite correct.

    That is how we knew the water level in the containment pool had dropped.

    The containment pool was always going to be the bigger issue.

    Hopefully the external power they are running in can get the main pumps up and running soon.
  16. Reynod said:
    Yes your quite correct.

    That is how we knew the water level in the containment pool had dropped.

    The containment pool was always going to be the bigger issue.

    Hopefully the external power they are running in can get the main pumps up and running soon.
    I'm just waiting for this thing to get hot enough to melt a large portion of the metal pellets in open air, spewing vaporized metal like a welding rod. Remember that they said these rods can reach 2000° F on their own, but the boiling point of Cesium is only 1240° F. One need only reach the melting point of the pellets before the cesium comes boiling out.
  17. It sounds like they are close to getting the power line back up to run the cooling pumps for reactors one and two. However, the spent fuel storage of reactor three is still being a pain, as that is the one that they are spraying down with water trucks and dumping water on with helicopters. Reactor 4's holding pool may not have any water in it at all at this point. Who knows. All I know is that based upon the photos of the reactors, some of them are messed up pretty bad thanks to the hydrogen explosions.
  18. Crashman said:
    Look, the hippy leftovers have a vision of a world that is nothing more than a group of communes. The only problem is that communes get some of their supplies, such as tools, from the outside industrial world. Their de-industrialization goals can only end with lives that are nasty, brutish, and short.


    LOL - I'm considering stealing that for a sig line. If I ever get into a hippy forum that is..

    Hey Reynod - can you start a leftover Hippy forum?? :P I think Badge would love to sign up, and maybe SS too :D.
  19. GE brings good things to life. Like some of our x-ray equiptment was built by Siemans in a joint venture with GE. The older reactors were retrofitted in the 80's. As someone already said, being as old and outdated as they are their structural integrity did well with what it had.

    Now wind currents have moved radiation into So. CA. the levels are estimated at one billionth of what is needed to kill you. Like the levels a common chest x-ray would produce. I didn't know radiation levels regarding a chest x-ray were even detectable with a good quality geiger counter-type measuring/testing device. In the wind current and delivered already within our atmosphere, the radiation is not blocked like the radioactive rays of the sun are by our ozone and atmosphere. The radioactive rays of the sun would kill us all instantly if not for the distance the sun is from earth and our protective upper atmosphere. In short...if you live near me, wear a lead suit.

    Hippie forum? For real man.
  20. Sandbag the reactor. Air drop sand and fill it in.
  21. LOL. Potassium is good. Brings life to my legs. Fish oil and bananas today despite my lead apron and face mask.
  22. So. CA has sold out of bananas.
  23. badge said:
    LOL. Potassium is good. Brings life to my legs. Fish oil and bananas today despite my lead apron and face mask.


    Or you could do like the Chinese who are reportedly buying all the iodized salt they can find. Wish I had stock in Morton's salted away (pun intended).
  24. Thyroid cancer prevention? Now there something new for old hippies to consider. You and me. I know a guy who's probably immune from eating his stash of salt when he saw the red lights pulling him over. A 60's thing. A time when the average Peace Officer asked, "Is that Morton's insense?" :)
  25. There is still a 30 miles radius restricted zone around Chernobyl after all these years. The amount of damage and fallout we are dealing with will be for your lifetime.
  26. badge said:
    There is still a 30 miles radius restricted zone around Chernobyl after all these years. The amount of damage and fallout we are dealing with will be for your lifetime.
    Dude, you're the one who said to sandbag the reactor. That's the kind of problem they're having to this day at Chernobyl.

    I don't know why nobody else has proposed this, but wouldn't "lead bagging" it be better? The problem with sand is that it melts and ruins the integrity of the concrete, wouldn't lead pellets improve the situation if they melted? Remember that lead is a SINK, it can draw the heat out of the rods and disperse it into the surroundings without leaking radiation.
  27. lead sandbags. this is possible? should be if it is not.
  28. if lead was used to containg radiation and that lead was compromised, melted etc., the lead would no longer serve it's intended purpose...to limit the amount of "scatter" radiation. Lead used in the proper application, filter etc., can control the amount of scatter radiation, the direction, speed and obviously the amount employed.
  29. potassium iodide is toxic in sustained dosages - eat iodized salt and deepwater fish instead
  30. true and good advice. are you an md from siu?
  31. badge said:
    if lead was used to containg radiation and that lead was compromised, melted etc., the lead would no longer serve it's intended purpose...to limit the amount of "scatter" radiation. Lead used in the proper application, filter etc., can control the amount of scatter radiation, the direction, speed and obviously the amount employed.
    If a large quantity of pelets melted it would contaminate the lead. But the lead would spread the heat, self sealing. It seems like the solution after that would be to add more lead.
  32. Lead is used to filter radiation exposure. The lead is precisely conformed, tool and died, into a precise mechanical fit working radiation filter. With lead filters, radiation exposure or the creation of radiation is controlled when using x-ray. What the lead filter controls is the amount of radiation that is employed while controlling the 'scatter'. Also the speed and accuracy of the x-ray (and any radiation) is controlled through the use of lead filters. I wasn't aware that lead actually absorbed radiation. Could be. We have some lead filters that have been in use 25 years now. It's not the filter that wears out or needs replaced, it ithe 'head' or 'tube' that creates the x-ray that weakens over time. Radiation can be 'controlled' and lead is one application to do so. Of course we are dealing with the ultimate 'scatter' or uncontrolled release of radiation effect. It will be interesting to see if lead comes in to play should the facility be 'buried'.

    Note I install and I adjust the filters as needed for which particular x-ray of the cranium needed. I also adjust the x-ray head as to the amount of x-ray to produce depending on body size. So, I control the amount, speed, distance and accuracy of the x-ray as well as controll the radiation and particularily the 'scatter' radiation before taking any craniofacial x-ray. One thing I do that is not common in x-ray is to x-ray the cranium. Do you believe we work with oral surgeons asking for my head film because they do not have the equiptment.

    As long as I do my job properly, there is no scatter radiation through the use of our 'control'. When that control is not deployed correctly, the scatter radiation is real.
  33. badge said:
    Lead is used to filter radiation exposure. The lead is precisely conformed, tool and died, into a precise mechanical fit working radiation filter. With lead filters, radiation exposure or the creation of radiation is controlled when using x-ray. What the lead filter controls is the amount of radiation that is employed while controlling the 'scatter'. Also the speed and accuracy of the x-ray (and any radiation) is controlled through the use of lead filters. I wasn't aware that lead actually absorbed radiation. Could be. We have some lead filters that have been in use 25 years now. It's not the filter that wears out or needs replaced, it ithe 'head' or 'tube' that creates the x-ray that weakens over time. Radiation can be 'controlled' and lead is one application to do so. Of course we are dealing with the ultimate 'scatter' or uncontrolled release of radiation effect. It will be interesting to see if lead comes in to play should the facility be 'buried'.

    Note I install and I adjust the filters as needed for which particular x-ray of the cranium needed. I also adjust the x-ray head as to the amount of x-ray to produce depending on body size. So, I control the amount, speed, distance and accuracy of the x-ray as well as controll the radiation and particularily the 'scatter' radiation before taking any craniofacial x-ray. One thing I do that is not common in x-ray is to x-ray the cranium. Do you believe we work with oral surgeons asking for my head film because they do not have the equiptment.

    As long as I do my job properly, there is no scatter radiation through the use of our 'control'. When that control is not deployed correctly, the scatter radiation is real.
    Yes, lead reflects most particles and absorbs others, it only needs to be thick enough...I proposed lead because it also acts as a sink, so they could sink the heat into the ground through the pool walls if they rods had good contact with the walls (via lead). My idea is to find a permanent solution to the heat problem, that also helps them deal with the radiation problem.

    Edit: From what I learned in Physics, it does the same thing as Gold only slightly less effectively. As you'll remember, Gold foil was used in the original experiments that confirmed our most widely-accepted model of atomic structure. If we wanted "better" we could us gold, but I'm thinking several tons of metal just for the cooling pond might be a bit of a procurement problem...
  34. Be interesting to see if lead is used in the end to containg the leaking radiation. I suppose at this point the radiation levels omitted into the atmosphere could be stronger before weaker. Be interesting to watch how this plays out. The creation of the scatter radiation has to get weaker or burn out at some point. How to containing it until it does seems to be a perplexing question. This is an instance when you don't want to say, "give it time." I think some measures to solve such a future situation should be top priority. What's the lifespan of the reactor doing what it's doing with the material it has currently in the condition it is in? Probably no one really knows. I can't venture even a guess.
  35. badge said:
    Be interesting to see if lead is used in the end to containg the leaking radiation. I suppose at this point the radiation levels omitted into the atmosphere could be stronger before weaker. Be interesting to watch how this plays out. The creation of the scatter radiation has to get weaker or burn out at some point. How to containing it until it does seems to be a perplexing question. This is an instance when you don't want to say, "give it time." I think some measures to solve such a future situation should be top priority. What's the lifespan of the reactor doing what it's doing with the material it has currently in the condition it is in? Probably no one really knows. I can't venture even a guess.
    All I know is that sandbagging the thing will make it a moderate problem for many many years. By moderate I mean it will leak a far larger amount of radiation, leading to a larger no-man's land and freaked-out Americans.

    Larger than what? Larger than if they got it under control, of course. Sandbags don't solve the problem they only reduce the damage of an ongoing problem.
  36. TMI and Cernobyl surely gave incintive to find a solution for this situation as it has occured once again. All the education and technology since those disasters appears to have gone into building bigger better, newer facilities. The U.S. has hundreds of these power plants. No plan should one 'fail'. There's a nuclear power plant on the Pacific Ocean about 60 miles from here. It fails and the people responsible for it's operation have no idea of how to stop the resulting radiation? Just stay away? There must be enough nuclear material and power in that facility to spew for most the upcoming decade. We have bit off more than we can chew in this regard. It is all very overwhelming.
  37. badge said:
    TMI and Cernobyl surely gave incintive to find a solution for this situation as it has occured once again. All the education and technology since those disasters appears to have gone into building bigger better, newer facilities. The U.S. has hundreds of these power plants. No plan should one 'fail'. There's a nuclear power plant on the Pacific Ocean about 60 miles from here. It fails and the people responsible for it's operation have no idea of how to stop the resulting radiation? Just stay away? There must be enough nuclear material and power in that facility to spew for most the upcoming decade. We have bit off more than we can chew in this regard. It is all very overwhelming.
    There's enough nuclear waste in most of these facilities to continue their operation for a couple hundred years, if only we could separate it properly. Oh, and we can, we just don't.

    The problem I see is too much high-level waste, hence the problem with the pools they're having now.

    BTW, I don't even know why we're using this type of reactor in the first place, considering its high amount of waste and constant need for monitoring. Here's some light reading:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Experimental_Breeder_Reactor_II
  38. Crashman said:
    Dude, you're the one who said to sandbag the reactor. That's the kind of problem they're having to this day at Chernobyl.

    I don't know why nobody else has proposed this, but wouldn't "lead bagging" it be better? The problem with sand is that it melts and ruins the integrity of the concrete, wouldn't lead pellets improve the situation if they melted? Remember that lead is a SINK, it can draw the heat out of the rods and disperse it into the surroundings without leaking radiation.


    Now they'd be adding toxic heavy metal to the mix :P..

    I dunno - that thought occurred to me as well - dump lead on the melted cores and then cap with concrete. However the lead would eventually find its way into the groundwater, but the reactor is at the edge of the ocean anyway..
  39. mdsiu said:
    potassium iodide is toxic in sustained dosages - eat iodized salt and deepwater fish instead


    Saw somewhere that it would take 27 pounds of iodized salt to equal the amount of iodine in one potassium iodide pill - you'd die of salt poisoning long before you got to even 4 ounces.. Not to mention what it'd do to your blood pressure (before you died that is) :P..
  40. fazers_on_stun said:
    LOL - I'm considering stealing that for a sig line. If I ever get into a hippy forum that is..

    Hey Reynod - can you start a leftover Hippy forum?? :P I think Badge would love to sign up, and maybe SS too :D.



    The News and Leisure section is where we encourage you to post "captivating" stories that you think will get others to engage positively. I tried to tidy things up and kick things along.

    We get a lot of traffic for this area - check the sheer number of "reads" for some of the threads.

    As badge is the master of off-topic discussions expect that things will meander along ... I will let things run their course and only close threads that have been inactive for a while. You can ask for them to be reopened too !

    The only rules are that you need to follow the TOU ... so you can't discuss Mrs Phillips here ... well ... not graphically, and you need to post something that is "Newsworthy" ... whatever that means I can't begin to explain as I am merely a disabled forklift driver in real life ... and possibly uglier than your dog.

    Crashman's de-industrialisation comment was a doozy ... yes.

    RE: Hippy forum we would need Pike to post here ... he was the last surviving hippy from the old forum ...

    badge is "hippyish" but his taste in music doesn't end with Bob Dylan ... and he is way too capitalistic ... has flash cars and servants.

    badge possibly has servants for his servants ... who might dress as hippies?

    StrangeStranger is more like James Dean than a hippy ... :)
  41. 3. Shielding: The term 'biological shield' refers to a mass of absorbing material placed around a reactor, or other radioactive source, to reduce the radiation to a level safe for humans.[1] The effectiveness of a material as a biological shield is related to its cross-section for scattering and absorption, and to a first approximation is proportional to the total mass of material per unit area interposed along the line of sight between the radiation source and the region to be protected. Hence, shielding strength or "thickness" is conventionally measured in units of g/cm2. The radiation that manages to get through falls exponentially with the thickness of the shield. In x-ray facilities, the plaster on the rooms with the x-ray generator contains barium sulfate and the operators stay behind a leaded glass screen and wear lead aprons. Almost any material can act as a shield from gamma or x-rays if used in sufficient amounts.

    My comment: This information relates to the idea of preventing 'scatter' radiation. In Japan you have damaged radioactive material compromised to the point of emitting harmful amounts of radiation into the atmosphere. And no 'biological shield' to contain or even limit the radiation. With my work in x-ray the only way to create the 'scatter' effect is to engage the tube (reactor or light source if you will) without the system's built in 'biological shield'...the proper lead filter. With x-ray the amount, speed and accuracy to which the lead filtered light is applied is controlled. Radiation is controlled in the clinical x-ray setting. Any 'biological shields' that were in place in Japan's reactors have been breached totally. Raw unfiltered, uncompromised radiation.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_protection
  42. Quote: badge is "hippyish" but his taste in music doesn't end with Bob Dylan ... and he is way too capitalistic ... has flash cars and servants.

    I only appear that way to attract attention. A problem you hippies obviously never had a problem with.

    http://img16.imageshack.us/img16/6900/hippieyears.jpg

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us
  43. That guy could single handedly run the world out of moose. :D
  44. I think He married Cher for a couple of days back in the 70's. Any word on when Cher's next Farewell Tour is scheduled?
  45. Found an interview/article with Richard Thornburgh, the governor of Pennsylvania at the time of the TMI incident. He offers some good advice for what the Japanese need/needed to do in terms of getting the correct information out there:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/dailybeast/20110312/ts_dailybeast/12884_threemileislandmeltdownrichardthornburghsadviceforjapan_1
  46. The interview with the GE engineer who quit when working on the Mark I was also very good.

    Japan should seriously invest in those wave generators ... next time a tsunami hits they should be able to sell surplus power to Russia ... instead of buying LPG from them (now).
  47. Yeah there have been a lot of news flashbacks about three mile island in recent days. That facility is still operating. The one reactor that was not damaged is still in operation. From what I understand most of the radiation that was leaked in 1979 was contained within the facility.
  48. fact is nuclear power plants are safe... tsunamis are not... all these "journalists" are idiots, nuclear power is safe. we need more nuclear power stations in america, burning coal isn't good for anyone except coal miners.
  49. I've read a few books on the TMI incident (I am not saying that I am an expert or anything like that), read a lot of the NRC stuff, and checked out old newspaper articles. My opinion is that the whole thing was blown out of proportion at the time, mainly because there was a serious lack of info coming from the plant itself and alot of assumptions from the NRC, federal, and state officials. The governor did a good job handling it though, as he made sure that the info was the best he could get before making a decision. Yes, it was a partial meltdown and that is not to be taken lightly, but overall the amount of radiation released was minimal in comparison to what it could have been.
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