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CPU Fan sounds like a Jet in a new build. Help please.

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October 14, 2011 7:45:40 PM

I recently installed the Asus Sabertooth (990FX) Am3+ mobo with 8gb of g skill ripjaws and a phenom II x4 945 processor. Everything had a successful POST and windows was successfully installed. However, my cpu fan sounds like a f15 every time I turn the computer on. It doesn't slowly rev up, but revs to full rpm as soon as I hit the power switch on my HAF 932. I went into UEFI, and it shows red bars for the RPM count on several of my fans. I kid you not when the cpu fan is reading as around 4500 RPM immediately after power on. What can be done to fix this? I have enabled fan-q control and reset the system, and the fans are still loud. Could it be the amount of thermal paste on the cpu+heatsink? It was my first time applying it, but, I made sure to spread the small amount on the cpu until it created a complete layer across the cpu. I put a decent amount on the heatsink, but not as much as the cpu.
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October 14, 2011 8:30:12 PM

anxious_galaxyhopper said:
I recently installed the Asus Sabertooth (990FX) Am3+ mobo with 8gb of g skill ripjaws and a phenom II x4 945 processor. Everything had a successful POST and windows was successfully installed. However, my cpu fan sounds like a f15 every time I turn the computer on. It doesn't slowly rev up, but revs to full rpm as soon as I hit the power switch on my HAF 932. I went into UEFI, and it shows red bars for the RPM count on several of my fans. I kid you not when the cpu fan is reading as around 4500 RPM immediately after power on. What can be done to fix this? I have enabled fan-q control and reset the system, and the fans are still loud. Could it be the amount of thermal paste on the cpu+heatsink? It was my first time applying it, but, I made sure to spread the small amount on the cpu until it created a complete layer across the cpu. I put a decent amount on the heatsink, but not as much as the cpu.


ummm?? Put the paste on #1- the cpu or #2- the heatsink... not both. Take apart, clean and re-apply.
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October 14, 2011 8:54:46 PM

When you power up a PC the CPU receives full voltage for the P0 state. This can cause the heatsink fan to run at full speed. I also agree that you do NOT want to apply TIM to both the CPU and HSF - only to one and only the size of an uncooked grain of rice is plenty of TIM.

OE HSFs tend to be noisy because they are small and thus must run at high speed to blow enough air to cool the CPU. Many folks prefer a better HSF with a larger, slower speed fan for lower nosie and better cooling. If you decide to go that route see the HSF test data at the link below so that you can make an informed buying decision.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm#AMDHEATSINK
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October 14, 2011 9:33:35 PM

beenthere said:
When you power up a PC the CPU receives full voltage for the P0 state. This can cause the heatsink fan to run at full speed. I also agree that you do NOT want to apply TIM to both the CPU and HSF - only to one and only the size of an uncooked grain of rice is plenty of TIM.

OE HSFs tend to be noisy because they are small and thus must run at high speed to blow enough air to cool the CPU. Many folks prefer a better HSF with a larger, slower speed fan for lower nosie and better cooling. If you decide to go that route see the HSF test data at the link below so that you can make an informed buying decision.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm#AMDHEATSINK


^ +1
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October 14, 2011 11:59:29 PM

beenthere said:
When you power up a PC the CPU receives full voltage for the P0 state. This can cause the heatsink fan to run at full speed. I also agree that you do NOT want to apply TIM to both the CPU and HSF - only to one and only the size of an uncooked grain of rice is plenty of TIM.

OE HSFs tend to be noisy because they are small and thus must run at high speed to blow enough air to cool the CPU. Many folks prefer a better HSF with a larger, slower speed fan for lower nosie and better cooling. If you decide to go that route see the HSF test data at the link below so that you can make an informed buying decision.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm#AMDHEATSINK



Thanks for the link, it's quite informative. I failed to mention earlier that my cpu+heatsink combo is from an HP pre-built that I have slowly upgraded. After looking online, it hit me in the face that I probably have a heatsink designed specifically for hp and hp motherboards. As for the thermal paste, I have cleaned and re-applied a smaller amount, and it looks perfect. Is size an issue for almost all heatsinks? I know quite a few Zalmans, CMs, etc are quite large.
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