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Core i5 2500 vs core i5 2500k

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February 11, 2011 12:09:34 PM

hey guys
i have a question is there much difference between core i5 2500 and core i5 2500k. both have same base frequency and both have same max turbo frequency. but a lil price difference. cant we overclock 2500?

More about : core 2500 core 2500k

a c 105 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
February 11, 2011 12:13:44 PM

"The new Core i5 2500K (3.3 GHz) is a quad-core CPU, coming in two flavors: with its clock multiplier unlocked (“K”, being the equivalent to the “Extreme Edition” CPUs Intel used to carry and to the “Black Edition” CPUs from AMD), giving you an extra way to overclock the CPU, and the standard model with a locked clock multiplier. The “K” model comes with a price tag of USD 216, while the standard model comes priced at USD 205."

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Core-i5-2500K-vs...
February 11, 2011 12:17:26 PM

is there much performance change if i use 2500 stock? cant i overclock 2500 to the same value as 2500k?
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a b à CPUs
February 11, 2011 12:32:25 PM

You can't overclock non-K Sandy Bridge chips at all - with everything on the board so intertwined now, only multiplier-based overclocking will work, and non-K CPUs have locked multipliers.

If you want to overclock, get the K. If you're using the integrated graphics, get the K. Otherwise, get the non-K.
February 11, 2011 12:40:16 PM

sorry but one more question. what does turbo boost do? dont it overclock 2500 to 3.7ghz? actually i was thinking to order i5 760 previously but now am thinking to go for i5 2500. i,ll be using 6850 graphics card with asus p8p67 mobo..
a b à CPUs
February 11, 2011 12:48:14 PM

Turbo Boost speeds up the cores when needed. The number of cores used will determine how big a speed jump you'll see. For instance, a single core can get boosted up by 400MHz (4 "bins" of 100MHz) to give single-threaded applications some extra kick. 3 cores would only get a single 100MHz boost.

I wouldn't think of it as overclocking to save confusion - different terminology really.

So, if you want to push your CPU past its rated settings then get the K series, otherwise you don't need it.
February 11, 2011 12:51:27 PM

so what does max turbo frequency indicate in 2500 stock? does it make the cpu run at 3.7ghz rather than 3.3ghz?
a b à CPUs
February 11, 2011 12:54:55 PM

On a single core yes.

Turbo Boost is a way of giving non-threaded software a performance boost. If some software is only using a single core, then the CPU will bump up its speed a bit.

If though you're using all 4 cores you won't get a speed boost.
February 11, 2011 12:58:14 PM

well it means with p67 chipset 2500 stock is well enough for gaming if am not considering overclocking the turbo boost will do the job automatically..?
a b à CPUs
February 11, 2011 12:58:40 PM

Quote:
Max turbo of 1 core at 4.1ghz can happen on the 2500. The K is just unlocked for overclocking.


Ah yes, you can configure the speed bins can't you - forgot about that. Still, Turbo Boost and overclocking are two different things really, and as stated you can't do the latter without a K-series CPU.
a b à CPUs
February 11, 2011 1:01:11 PM

robinkhan07 said:
well it means with p67 chipset 2500 stock is well enough for gaming if am not considering overclocking the turbo boost will do the job automatically..?


Don't confuse the two - if you want your CPU to run at 3.7GHz then get a K series and overclock it. If you're content with a 3.3GHz CPU that just so happens to give you a bit of extra juice once in a while get the non-K.

But yes, a 3.3GHz 2500 (K or not) will be awesome for gaming.
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
February 11, 2011 1:25:10 PM

LePhuronn said:
Turbo Boost and overclocking are two different things really, and as stated you can't do the latter with a K-series CPU.


Actually you can directly overclock the 2500K, mine is presently running all 4 cores at 4500mhz.

****************************************************************************************************

To the OP: robinkhan07

Quote:
hey guys
i have a question is there much difference between core i5 2500 and core i5 2500k. both have same base frequency and both have same max turbo frequency. but a lil price difference. cant we overclock 2500?


No offense but the questions you're asking here, indicate you have very little overclocking experience under your belt so unless you're ready to get yourself on a serious learning curve, you'll probably be better off with either the total stock experience, IE, the locked 2500, which will still allow the 3.7 Turbo Boost.

Or get yourself the 2500K/P67 chip set M/B and use its automatic built in BIOS overclocking feature.
February 11, 2011 1:35:15 PM

yup i have little to no overclocking experience frankly;-) bt i was thinking to do all my learning on my new pc. however due to certain reasons am not able to get 2500k and will be sticking with 2500stock with ausu p67 mobo. what i was trying to ask was that is there a lot of performance change between the two or any of two is well enough.
a b à CPUs
February 11, 2011 1:47:56 PM

4Ryan6 said:
Actually you can directly overclock the 2500K, mine is presently running all 4 cores at 4500mhz.


Yeah my bad - it was a typo on my part, I meant to say "without a K-series CPU".

Edited my post.


OP: honestly, it's not a big issue - the Sandy Bridge chips are awesome even at stock. If you can't get a K series then you'll be perfectly happy anyway. If you can get one, then overclocking is easy - just take your CPU multiplier up as far as your cooling and motherboard can handle (turn Turbo Boost off though).
February 11, 2011 1:47:57 PM

wow man that was great. thanks dude. means i can overclock 2500stock to 3.8ghz at all four cores. thats well enough for me i dont want my pc to get the max 5.7ghz. am fine with 3.8 or 4.1 in case of single core. that will be a bit useful to learn overclocking too... so conclusion is that i can overclock 2500stock to a limited value ang to exceed that limited value i need to shift to k series(which i dont think i need)..
so thanks alot guys. and do correct me if am wrong anyway..
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
February 11, 2011 1:50:20 PM

Quote:
Now the K-series of CPUs, with the Core i5-2500K and Core i7-2600K are fully unlocked and will let you overclock them as far as the CPU and/or your cooling can sustain.


Affirmative!
a c 80 à CPUs
a c 205 K Overclocking
February 11, 2011 1:57:04 PM

LePhuronn said:
Yeah my bad - it was a typo on my part, I meant to say "without a K-series CPU".

Edited my post.


OP: honestly, it's not a big issue - the Sandy Bridge chips are awesome even at stock. If you can't get a K series then you'll be perfectly happy anyway. If you can get one, then overclocking is easy - just take your CPU multiplier up as far as your cooling and motherboard can handle (turn Turbo Boost off though).


Totally agree! These new CPUs are awesome performers right out of the box, my 2500Ks default performance scores, bested my AMD 965BE scores OCd to 4.0G
February 20, 2011 10:43:39 PM

sorry to dig into an older topic, I thought I'd post my question within this one:
Is anything known of the intel graphics between those 2 processors, and if both encode video as well as the other?

I'd like to approach it from the view of having or not having a discrete graphics card when playing games, one processor vs the other.

I know the internal graphics processor is not very good, but wanted to compare 2500 vs 2500k, not embedded vs discrete graphics card; as well as it's hardware accelerated video encoding performance.

I would like to add from the intel specs that the 2500k does not have following feats:
- Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d)
- Intel® Trusted Execution Technology

The 2500 seems to have them.
a b à CPUs
February 21, 2011 9:32:53 AM

K series use HD 3000 integrated graphics, non-K use HD 2000. I would assume the 3000 is better than the 2000, but I have no interest in IGP so I couldn't say any more than that.

Those missing virtualisation features are to stop corporate customers from getting a cheap CPU and overclocking the *** out of it, thus not spending money on Xeons.
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