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Windows 7 for games

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December 29, 2009 10:15:19 AM

Ok i have just finished a new build, it's for gaming. So the next question to answer is what operating system? Well i figured that windows 7 would be the best, multi core/DX11 support etc. ok first real question which windows 7? i figured home prem? ok question number 2. 32 or 64 bit. i am going to be running games like assasins creed which i think only supports 32 bit, says on the box, i think. So i though 32 bit? And i guess just what ever elce u can think of

thx 4 yr elp

More about : windows games

December 29, 2009 10:28:58 AM

oh yeah fogot to write 2 things.
1 i am on a budget so dont just say ultimate x64 because it's cool or something like that because i wont be able to aford it.
2 how much more is the normal version over the OEM, first build so i was thinking normal. but yeah so i am better with the hardware than software so u could call me a complete n00b at software.

thx 4 yr elp
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a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2009 10:55:49 AM

really sounds like you already answered your own question
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December 29, 2009 3:41:42 PM

mother242 said:
Ok i have just finished a new build, it's for gaming. So the next question to answer is what operating system? Well i figured that windows 7 would be the best, multi core/DX11 support etc. ok first real question which windows 7? i figured home prem? ok question number 2. 32 or 64 bit. i am going to be running games like assasins creed which i think only supports 32 bit, says on the box, i think. So i though 32 bit? And i guess just what ever elce u can think of

thx 4 yr elp

you should use 32-bit because some games dont work in 64x-bit and if you want to play a game who needs openGL(like star wars jedi knight)then you cant play.I think you should use 32-bit
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a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2009 4:19:10 PM

Sigh.... ok the best upgrade route to go down at the moment is Windows 7 / Home Premium 64 bit.

Games hardly ever show any difference between 32 / 64 bit versions because the OS is more than capable of running in either mode depending on the software.

I have several games originally written on Windows XP / 32 that run perfectly on Windows 7 / 64.

Worst case scenario for any games that dont run right away on Win 7 / 64 is to run them in XP compatibility mode.

Windows 7 Home Premium will do everything you need it to do.... forget the ultimate edition as to 90% of users the extras are not worth the huge increase in costs
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a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2009 4:20:24 PM

Sorry I missed a bit....

Retail (boxed) v OEM - apart from the packaging there is no difference except the cost. OEM will be fine also
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a b $ Windows 7
December 29, 2009 4:34:12 PM

fungamer20able said:
you should use 32-bit because some games dont work in 64x-bit and if you want to play a game who needs openGL(like star wars jedi knight)then you cant play.I think you should use 32-bit



Except for Steam (the service itself), which have been terribly slow to update, I have yet to find a game that doesn't run on Win 7 x64. Also OpenGL libraries may be downloaded and installed as/if needed.
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December 29, 2009 10:55:27 PM

I am running tons of applications made for 32bit xp/vista and run without a problem on win7 x64...its has lots of compatability with older programs. The only app so far i have problems with is Installing Nero 7 Ultimate Edition which i use to burn ISO's but that problem was easily fixed by downloading Nero 9 Lite which is free and is for win7 and burns ISO's which is what i need.

By normal version, there are 3 versions actually, there is the OEM, Upgrade, and Full. OEM and Upgrade are about the same, OEM can be a couple bucks cheaper usually then the upgrade. Full is much more expensive though. 32bit and 64bit cost the same. And if you have a 64-bit CPU and 4gb+of ram your OS would be severly bottlnecking your system.
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December 30, 2009 12:08:31 AM

ok here are systems specs
AMD phenomII x4 965
Gigabyte Ga Ma79xt ud4p
4gb ddr3 ripjaws
ATI radeon hd5850
500gb seagate barracuda

Quote:
Sigh.... ok the best upgrade route to go down at the moment is Windows 7 / Home Premium 64 bit.

Games hardly ever show any difference between 32 / 64 bit versions because the OS is more than capable of running in either mode depending on the software.

I have several games originally written on Windows XP / 32 that run perfectly on Windows 7 / 64.

Worst case scenario for any games that dont run right away on Win 7 / 64 is to run them in XP compatibility mode.

Windows 7 Home Premium will do everything you need it to do.... forget the ultimate edition as to 90% of users the extras are not worth the huge increase in costs


also i thought that home premium didnt have XP compatibility mode? i thought that that was only professional and above.
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December 30, 2009 1:01:04 AM

I am using home premium x64 and it has compatibility mode every OS, all the way back to windows 95 with all service packs :) 
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a b $ Windows 7
December 30, 2009 1:22:34 AM

The windows-7 web site has a comparison chart of the different capabilities:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/compare/defa...
I think the home premium version will be suitable, unless there is a feature that you really need. Note that XP compatibility(present on all versions) is different from XP mode which requires professional or ultimate. It allows you to run XP in a virtual machine and is not suitable for gaming.

Almost anything will run under the 64 bit version that is required to be able to use all 4gb. There are very few exceptions, and most of those have a newer version that runs on a 64 bit OS.

Shopping tips for Vista:
1) Do you qualify for an academic license?
If so, you can get windows-7 at a discounted price(about $30).
2) Look for an upgrade version of home premium instead of OEM.
Upgrade is a retail version which gives you support from microsoft, unlike OEM(AKA system builder),
and allows a more hassel-free ability to transfer the os to a different pc(motherboard).
You get both 32 bit and 64 bit DVD's so you can dual boot with either version if you need to.

There is a legitimate two step instalation process to install an upgrade version
You install windows-7 from the cd, but do not initially enter the product code or activate.
After it installs, you have a fully functional OS for 30 days.
Step 2 is to insert the dvd again, while running Windows and then do an upgrade.
This time, enter your product code, and activate.
After activation. you may delete the initial version which is named windows.old.

If you get a retail or upgrade version, you will still be able to upgrade to ultimate later, not so with oem.
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a b $ Windows 7
December 30, 2009 1:25:19 AM

I have been putting OEM Windows 7 Pro 64 bit on boxes....

1. At $139 it's hardly a budget breaker and the extra $35 gets you the insurance of XP mode.

2. When you consider that the "anytime upgrade" is $85 to make the same move, seems a sound investment.

3. On laptop has location aware printing and offline files

4. Gives network backup capability.

5. Encrypted file system, software restrictions and and group policies if having parents / kids access restrictions are important.
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