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ASUS an unsafe bet right now?

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October 24, 2011 1:48:53 AM

I've narrowed my choice of motherboard for my new i5-2500k build to an ASUS P8P67 Rev3.0 or a Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 based on the features I need and the fact that they're both in stock locally and priced the same ($135 canadian after rebates).

Overall it seems like the ASUS is the best choice because I'm not planning any dual-GPU stuff and the fan control options on the Gigabyte suck, but I'm seeing a LOT of complaints online about ASUS boards failing lately.

Check out the Newegg ratings, there are almost as many 1/5s as there are 5/5s, lots from the past month, and even a lot of the higher ratings are from people who's boards failed and gave credit for the features anyway. A guy I know who work at a store also says more ASUS boards are coming back than others.

I'm going for a modestly overclocked (~4.5 Ghz) near-silent gaming build, no Crossfire, and I want to use onboard fan control, both of which the ASUS looks better for.

Is this problem being blown out of proportion or should I stay away from the ASUS board?

More about : asus unsafe bet

a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 2:34:31 AM

I've been building high end PCs for over 20 years and IME Asus mobos are RAM sensitive and less reliable than Gigabyte mobos. I don't know that Asus has any abnormal issue with their mobos right now. It may just be the normal high return rate? For performance and reliability I recommend Gigabyte mobos.
a b V Motherboard
October 24, 2011 2:43:43 AM

I seem to be choosing the Gigabyte boards also lately. They hold up better for me than the asus boards have been. What good are extra features if your board is in the rma mail?
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a c 222 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 3:04:57 AM

The P8P67 Rev 3.0 has been replaced by the P8P67 Rev 3.1. They seem to be clearing out the remaining stock of Rev 3.0 still in the distribution channel hence why they are offering the mail-in rebate.

Rev 3.1 motherboards are suppose to be using the new ASMedia USB 3.0 controller in place of the NEC USB 3.0 controller on the Rev 3.0 motherboards.

As to any other fixes or differences, I haven't heard about any. The four Newegg.com Customer Reviews on the Rev 3.1 motherboard isn't a big enough sample to gauge if the stability and reliability have improved over the Rev 3.0.
October 24, 2011 3:47:36 PM

Thanks guys. Double checking the online inventory, the Rev. 3.0s only seem to be in stock at the location furthest away from me. Rev. 3.1s are full price, giving the bargain advantage to the Gigabyte, as long as I don't need the better VRMs I'd get in boards $15 - 25 more expensive.

Used a Gigabyte in my current machine, so well used to the pigeon engrish and no need for a graphical BIOS.
a c 261 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 4:08:37 PM

As an early adopter, I bought a ASUS P8P67-M PRO motherboard. When the P67 chipset issue surfaced, Asus offered a credit card exchange for a rev 3 board which was most convenient. Gigabyte required you to return the motherboard to the original vendor first for exchange, leaving you without a motherboard for the duration. Point is, that ASUS addressed the problem well.

Any motherboard can have an issue, particularly when new. The issue will get resolved as bios updates are released.
My advice is to buy a motherboard that has been out a while, so any lingering issues have been resolved.

Look carefully at the negative reviews. Many times, the user was trying to do something out of the ordinary, or was trying to use unsupported ram.

I have used ASUS,ASROCK, and Gigabyte, and they were all good, at least for me.
October 24, 2011 4:20:28 PM

I've just realized an Asrock P67 Extreme4 may be in stock nearby, tempted. For a $25 premium over the Gigabyte I'll trade the unneeded Z68 features for fan control and a front USB 3 panel that would've cost me $15 by itself.

I'll probably look for the Asrock first.
a c 261 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 4:42:02 PM

magneticballs said:
I've just realized an Asrock P67 Extreme4 may be in stock nearby, tempted. For a $25 premium over the Gigabyte I'll trade the unneeded Z68 features for fan control and a front USB 3 panel that would've cost me $15 by itself.

I'll probably look for the Asrock first.


ASROCK is a spinoff from ASUS originally intended to produce low cost motherboards. They have succeeded in producing highly featured motherboards at a good price. I have been pleased with them.

But, I question the need for their extreme motherboard if you are on a budget.

1) Do you really plan on sli? Motherboards supporting that will be more expensive. You will also need a stronger psu than a strong single card would require. If you are planning on triple monitor gaming, then sli is in the cards. If not, then a good single graphics card is all you need.

2) How much should you value fan control? All motherboards have them to some extent. But, I find that constantly varying fan speeds is annoying. Why not set the fans at a good speed and let them stay there. When the demand gets higher, the parts will heat up a bit, but so what? The increase is never enough to cause damage. A graphics card can go to 100c. and the cpu to 70c. before they downclock to protect themselves. In any case with two 120mm intake fans, you will get sufficient cooling.

3) The specs for motherboard usb3.0 headers have not yet been standardized so far as I know. Motherboard vendors may or may not have such internal headers, and case vendors don't quite know how to handle them. Some will offer adapters, and some will offer rear panel pass through cables. Does it really matter though?
Will you be plugging any hard drives into the front ports on a regular basis? That is the only type of usb3.0 device that can utilize the speeds.
I actually find it more convenient to plug my external usb3.0 backup into the rear usb3.0 port and leave it there. I just switch the drive on when I need to do a backup. The front usb3.0 ports are compatible with 2.0 and work fine for thumb drives and cameras.
October 24, 2011 4:50:29 PM

When I bought my i5-2500k I got the option of a package deal with a motherboard. even though the two mother boards (Asus and gigabyte) were similar in price and features, I went with the gigabyte simply because it had a black Finnish and I liked the look of it. Sometimes little dumb things like that can drastically change sales when features and price are neck and neck between leading brands. Don't know if that would explain rma rates though.
October 24, 2011 5:25:58 PM

geofelt said:
ASROCK is a spinoff from ASUS originally intended to produce low cost motherboards. They have succeeded in producing highly featured motherboards at a good price. I have been pleased with them.

This seems to be the common sentiment.

But, I question the need for their extreme motherboard if you are on a budget.

1) Do you really plan on sli? Motherboards supporting that will be more expensive. You will also need a stronger psu than a strong single card would require. If you are planning on triple monitor gaming, then sli is in the cards. If not, then a good single graphics card is all you need.

The most I expect to do with this machine is single-monitor gaming, probably never higher than 1920x1200. Not planning any crossfire at all.

2) How much should you value fan control? All motherboards have them to some extent. But, I find that constantly varying fan speeds is annoying. Why not set the fans at a good speed and let them stay there. When the demand gets higher, the parts will heat up a bit, but so what? The increase is never enough to cause damage. A graphics card can go to 100c. and the cpu to 70c. before they downclock to protect themselves. In any case with two 120mm intake fans, you will get sufficient cooling.

The main reason I want total fan control is so that I can experiment and tweak to minimize noise. Hardware fan controllers that I'm aware of are more expensive without the option of auto-control, and I don't want to do any manual adjustments on the fly. With neither hardware or onboard control I'll have to spend time and money on different fans, inline controllers, wiring mods, etc. to get the same result. Especially if I end up looking for an aftermarket GPU cooler.

3) The specs for motherboard usb3.0 headers have not yet been standardized so far as I know. Motherboard vendors may or may not have such internal headers, and case vendors don't quite know how to handle them. Some will offer adapters, and some will offer rear panel pass through cables. Does it really matter though?
Will you be plugging any hard drives into the front ports on a regular basis? That is the only type of usb3.0 device that can utilize the speeds.
I actually find it more convenient to plug my external usb3.0 backup into the rear usb3.0 port and leave it there. I just switch the drive on when I need to do a backup. The front usb3.0 ports are compatible with 2.0 and work fine for thumb drives and cameras.

I use my front USB 2.0 ports constantly for thumbdrives. I don't own an external drive, but I will soon, and I wouldn't want to leave it connected all the time. Isolating it from electrical damage or moving files between computers is the main reason I would back up on an external rather than an internal drive.
I don't own any USB 3.0 devices now, but I don't want to need a $30 hardware add-on to support them in a year or two, and I will ONLY want to use front-mounted ones.
Everything I transfer to or from USB 3.0 devices is going to be coming from mechanical hard drives, so even if the current controllers can only give me 2x USB 3.0 speed, thats as much benefit as I'm going to see anyway.

*Edit: I don't need the USB 3 right now, but my last PC lasted me a good 5 years longer than I'd planned. The extra cost seems reasonable for the future convenience.

a c 261 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 5:53:09 PM

Sounds like your system will be much like mine.

1) Look for a M-ATX motherboard. They are smaller and cheaper.
I use a ASUS P8P67-M-Pro, which has worked well, but the more modern equivalent Z68 based unit is the ASUS P8Z68-M Pro
It has plenty of internal fan headers. The ASRock Z68M/USB3 looks similar for a lesser price:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I use speedfan, mostly to monitor temperatures, but you can also use it to manage motherboard fan speeds.

2) Look at the Silverstone TJ08-E case. It comes with a two speed 180mm fan. I have the fan on low and undervolted, with no need for an exhaust 120mm fan. It cools my GTX580 well and is virtually silent. There is a microcode patch to reduce the minimum GTX... fan speed from 40% to 30%, but it is really not needed. You can set the gpu fan speed profile in software. You may have to shop for it, it sems to be in high demand and out of stock quickly:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The case comes with usb3.0 front ports, and a usb3.0 to2.0 converter cable.

3) My GTX580 is a EVGA superclocked. I never hear it under load. I think the direct exhaust type cooler gets the heat out of the case quickly.
October 24, 2011 6:25:19 PM

geofelt said:
Sounds like your system will be much like mine.

1) Look for a M-ATX motherboard. They are smaller and cheaper.
I use a ASUS P8P67-M-Pro, which has worked well, but the more modern equivalent Z68 based unit is the ASUS P8Z68-M Pro
It has plenty of internal fan headers. The ASRock Z68M/USB3 looks similar for a lesser price:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I use speedfan, mostly to monitor temperatures, but you can also use it to manage motherboard fan speeds.


I'm avoiding M-ATX boards in general to leave room for cards and tinkering with the video cooling. I need a slot for a wireless adapter at the very least, and I'm not counting on the onboard sound. I know the current gen sound is supposed to be a lot better, but they said the same thing when I built my current system.

After my last response I gave the USB 3 more thought, realized I'm being stupid. Most of my USB copying isn't in a hurry, and anytime it is I can spare an extra 10 seconds to use the rear ports. Even if I find myself using them constantly I can route extension cables to the front.

The lower-end ASrock boards (the Pro3s) should give me the same fan control, cost the same or less than the Gigabyte UD3H, and I'll only sacrifice the front USB 3 and a couple useless SATA III ports. I'll see if I can find one of those first.

*Edit: Considering this as my first choice.
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 7:05:14 PM

Yeah! I had Soooooooo much fun with Gigabyte -> http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/276715-30-x58a-ud3r-r... ; one of my 1st posts here.

I'm in this section all of the time, I build very high-end and have been doing it for quite sometime. Limiting myself to P67/Z68:
ASUS ; 90%+ of the problems are from old BIOS; Fix -> Update your BIOS ASAP.
Gigabyte ; I've seen bad batches of UD3, UD4, UD5 and many 22nm BIOS 1st editions; Fix -> don't use the 1st 22nm BIOS version.

Overclocking, is all bout the: Luck of th e CPU, vCore and cooling. The minimum based on fact is to use 12-Phase or higher MOBO's on the LGA 1155; it use to be 16-Phase on LGA 1366.

Cheap vs Enthusiast vs High-End - for OC'ing 4.50GHz + (Enthusiast and High-End) then add/search for your doodads.

Minimum recommended for 4.5GHz+:
ASUS:
P67 ASUS P8P67 WS REVOLUTION ; best 3-WAY + PhysX LGA 1155 - period
P67 ASUS P8P67 PRO (REV 3.1) or (REV 3.0) ; USB 3.0 controller difference only
Z68 ASUS P8Z68-V PRO

Gigabyte:
P67 GA-P67A-UD7-B3 ; 3-WAY
Z68 Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD5
Z68 Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD7-B3 ; 3-WAY, wacky price performs the same as GA-P67A-UD7-B3

EVGA:
P67 EVGA P67 FTW 160-SB-E679-K2
Z68 EVGA Z68 FTW 160-SB-E689-K2
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 7:10:31 PM

magneticballs said:
...but I'm seeing a LOT of complaints online about ASUS boards failing lately.

Check out the Newegg ratings, there are almost as many 1/5s as there are 5/5s, lots from the past month, and even a lot of the higher ratings are from people who's boards failed and gave credit for the features anyway. A guy I know who work at a store also says more ASUS boards are coming back than others....


RE: ASUS boards are coming back than others - ASUS sells 7-to-1 more than other MOBOs.
ASUS - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asus ; US$18.5 billion (2009)
Gigabyte - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte_Technology ; US$ 2.5 billion ?(2010)

From another post:
Yeah, I've read the 'Feedback' and in other posts I've addressed concerns.

Example - "If you NEED 1 that works BUY 4"
The chances of a DOA MOBO, a real one, are about 1 in 50 or less. IF some bozo has 3 or more DOA then the 'builder' is taking an otherwise 'good MOBO' and 'killing it' themselves - 9/10 by shorting or bad PSU. - period!

Example - "Screwd up"
1. Remembering settings - DO NOT USE *ANY* AI Suite (ASUS) or it's equivalent on MSI, Gigabyte, etc. The BIOS reads the 'tweaks' from those Apps and changes the BIOS according to the Apps NOT the manual BIOS settings.
2. SATA - since LGA 1155 the SATA default is AHCI NOT IDE, and often Windows uses Start = 3 = IDE by Default; see - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976

Example - "Defective board, nightmarish experience"
1. Metal Backplate HSF - this is typical when there's Metal -> MOBO contact
2. Standoff - many cheaper Cases use 'punch-out' standoff's and/or the Standoff's are misplaced; Metal -> MOBO contact. Some Cases that have pre-installed Standoff's do so with mATX (uATX) positions NOT ATX.
All Examples of Shorts (Grounding, Dead, Cross connecting, etc).

Example - "Fire Hazard, Poor Service"
See above 'Metal' and ditto with a defective PSU; dead short.

Most folks are MORONS and should buy a Pre-Built system!!!

ANY LGA 1155 build: 1. Build it outside the CASE FIRST & TEST, 2. Update the BIOS to the latest version BEFORE installing OS and skip the First 22nm (Ivy Bridge) BIOS release i.e. use the 2nd or 3rd AFTER 22nm or the one PRIOR.

I seriously doubt that if I built the ASUS P8P67 (REV 3.0) I would have ANY issues, I have built several P8P67 PRO (REV 3.1) and with NO ISSUES! See - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Similar comments e.g. "2 in a row" on page 2 - similar BOZOS!
October 24, 2011 7:37:36 PM

jaquith said:
Yeah! I had Soooooooo much fun with Gigabyte -> http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/276715-30-x58a-ud3r-r... ; one of my 1st posts here.


I might've actually skimmed through that thread, actually. I've definitely seen that sentence about the Gigabyte's having "indigestion" from BIOS changes.

Obviously all boards have a chance of failure, and a lot of people are causing their own. The ASUS boards stood out, though. The ~35% 1/5 ratings on Newegg compared to the 15-17% on most make it look like there's something going on.
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 24, 2011 8:58:50 PM

Being real, it's VERY RARE for someone with a Good Experience to take the time to post 'Good Stuff'. I've been dealing with the public for a longtime, and I find that you can make (anything) out of Solid GOLD -- and people will still bitch.

Additionally, I see Parroting of 'issues' that have no basis. Especially over the past year I see the overall ratings on ALL LGA 1155 MOBO's down, similar patterns with the P55/LGA 1156 versus the LGA 1366 and I suspect the LGA 2011. Reason, expense. The more expensive MOBO's/CPU/GPU typically draw folks with higher level of experiences that purchase them.

ASUS's key issue (problems) early on were 'buggy BIOS.' I rarely find a real problem with the MOBO itself, and find besides BIOS most of the problems are other components and poor installation of other components. Experience will allow you to 'see the truth' of a problem.

Next, I filter-out only the Verified Owners -> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13-131-... ; next I look at 'In Their Opinion' Tech Level to see if there's a fundamental FLAW in design ; next if that 'FLAW' pertains to my environment.

Further, I ask or look for Reviewer's whom have either used a particular MOBO and/or folks that know of 'known' problems.

In my case, I look for MOBO's that are KNOWN to have lower on average and predictable vCores, and also offer the feature needed.

I do agree that ASUS is such a large company that their 'Reply Time' is too long. One of the reasons I like, for example, EVGA is because of their superior Tech Support and Warranty/Exchange Policies. However, IF the MOBO, GPU, or whatever has 'lack-luster' performance then that renders (my) selection or recommendation poor.

--

If you post a problem that catches your eye I'll be more than happy to render an opinion or probable cause.
October 25, 2011 12:59:04 AM

ASUS is total garbage. I spent over a year trying to get a mobo I bought from them to work. It ended up killing my GPU and I had to buy another board and a GPU. I'll never buy ASUS again, not worth the hassle. Go with a company that will protect your investment in them. Just my two cents.
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 25, 2011 1:07:33 AM

If your GPU was damaged then it was your PSU - guaranteed. It's common for a damaged PSU to also damage anything it's attached to including MOBO, GPU(s), CPU(s), RAM, you name it.

You like others assume the wrong component.
October 25, 2011 1:12:17 AM

I had my PSU tested. Along with every other part of my computer. My CPU was fine, my ram was fine. I'm sharing my experience with ASUS's crap customer service and not just the quality of the board. You need both to be stellar.
October 25, 2011 1:28:45 AM

My two cents:

I currently run one PC with an Asus board and one with a Gigabyte board. My take is that Asus board performs better but the Gigabyte is more rock-stable. So, up to you on that. In middle and lower end, I'd go Gigabyte. In higher end, Asus.

I've previously owned other Asus boards with good results and one Asrock that was fine but nothing special.
October 25, 2011 2:37:16 AM

Chirality said:
I had my PSU tested. Along with every other part of my computer. My CPU was fine, my ram was fine. I'm sharing my experience with ASUS's crap customer service and not just the quality of the board. You need both to be stellar.


Even if it was the board's fault, the web is full of people saying the exact same thing about every company, and every product, ever.
October 25, 2011 6:05:52 AM

You should use gigabyte, because i faced the same problem with asus motherboard. At now my mother board is in service centre.
October 26, 2011 1:11:14 AM

I am using a Asus ROG crosshair 4 formula and i have had no issues at all including having no ram issues. 1 thing that i do like about gigabyte is that dual bios feature. Asus has mem ok which gets rid of most ram sensitivity issues not to mention they seem to be a very good company. i switched from a msi and have been very happy. if it were me i would go with Asus
October 26, 2011 2:20:43 AM

I picked up the majority of my components today. Went with an ASrock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 for $130. Tested it to BIOS without a case or a hard drive (don't have my OS yet) with exactly the kind of fan control I was looking for and some nice debugging features: power, reset, clear CMOS and error code display on the board.

Now I need to make sure my power supply is working properly. Does 12.355v on the +12 (reading from BIOS) with only a CPU installed suggest anything wrong?
a c 222 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 26, 2011 5:06:42 PM

magneticballs said:
I picked up the majority of my components today. Went with an ASrock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 for $130. Tested it to BIOS without a case or a hard drive (don't have my OS yet) with exactly the kind of fan control I was looking for and some nice debugging features: power, reset, clear CMOS and error code display on the board.

Now I need to make sure my power supply is working properly. Does 12.355v on the +12 (reading from BIOS) with only a CPU installed suggest anything wrong?

Your +12V rail's reading of 12.355v is within the ATX12V power supply design specifications.

DC Output Voltage Regulation

Output: +12VDC
Range: ±5%
Minimum: +11.40V
Nominal: +12.00
Maximum: +12.60V
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 26, 2011 5:13:50 PM

I assume you know - ASUS owns ASRock and the ASRock is simply a stripped-down version of the ASUS counter parts...aka cheaper.

Analogy - Lexus - (Quality Parts) = Toyota.
a c 261 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 26, 2011 5:15:21 PM

Here is a link to a report on the return rate for a number of computer products from various vendors.
For motherboards, the rates vary from 1.4% to 2.8% with ASUS being among the lowest.
http://www.behardware.com/articles/831-1/components-ret...

Interesting reading for hard drivees, ssd's and other components too.
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 26, 2011 5:26:09 PM

And 80% of RMA's are due to erroneous returns; aka nothing wrong other than a 'builder' who doesn't know 'How to Build'.

I've personally observed 1/75 or 1.33% are legit problems, and 1/2 or more are due to Shipping Damages. UPS treating the boxes like Frisbee's.
a c 117 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 27, 2011 4:41:20 AM

Great reading on this thread btw.
I agree 100% with jaquith's evaluation of Newegg feedback.
Especially users who blame mobo makers for their errors and lack of knowledge.
Read a good one tonight where i guy couldn't unlock his AMD cpu so he blamed the mobo.
I've personally owned mobos from Asus,Gigabyte,and MSI.
All have been great.
I prefer Gigabyte though = stable and forgiving

October 28, 2011 12:36:06 PM

Well I've got my system up and running nicely. 2500k on the ASrock Extreme 3 with a Mugen 2b cooler, 8 GB of 1600 MHz Cl9 Ripjaws and a Gigabyte 6950 in a really flexible Enermax case that was on sale. Unexpected bonus: the case had a USB 3.0 port that connects via extension cable (through water-cooling ports) instead of a header. eSATA as well.

Considering this is my first new rig in 8 years, the coil whine from the Radeon running 1600+ fps in 3dMark03 was more welcome than it might've been.
October 29, 2011 5:51:34 PM

beenthere said:
I've been building high end PCs for over 20 years and IME Asus mobos are RAM sensitive and less reliable than Gigabyte mobos. I don't know that Asus has any abnormal issue with their mobos right now. It may just be the normal high return rate? For performance and reliability I recommend Gigabyte mobos.


I have purchased an ASUS revolution Mobo and it did not produce any video at all, not a flash/flicker at all, tried the other video slots/new memory/CMOS reset and still nothing I noticed that the video card was getting very warm/hotter than normal with the fan working also, did a RMA for same Mobo and got the same results again, After each Mobo failed I reinstalled the old Mobo wich was failing and every thing worked video card was cool to touch and worked well, I sent Mobo #2 RMA for refund, and got the Gigabyte G1 Mobo, It also produced the same No video problem after I tried all the remedy's, Even tried a new video card to no avail, And with the Memory from the QVL list on both boards, Question: What am I doing wrong here I have the i7 920 proccessor with the ATI Radion HD 4800 with two 6 pin power connectors, and I always connected both to the old MSI Mobo that always worked when reassembled after the 3 Mobo's failed, I have a Antec 1200w power supply, I know these Mobo's need an external power hookup for the video card, and tried using only one or both to see if power was an issue, and still got nothing, all the lights for diag was coming on and going green for pass on the memory/CPU/Expansion (video) card,and indicated the processor and all other comonents were functioning, Butt!! No Video, Could the X58 chipset be at fault on both Mobo's, I need any input for this matter before the next Gigabyte Mobo #2 gets here to avoid Failure #4.... PS: the new video card is a G-force GTX 550 Ti...
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 29, 2011 5:58:55 PM

barilenator said:
I have purchased an ASUS revolution Mobo and it did not produce any video at all, not a flash/flicker at all, tried the other video slots/new memory/CMOS reset and still nothing I noticed that the video card was getting very warm/hotter than normal with the fan working also, did a RMA for same Mobo and got the same results again, After each Mobo failed I reinstalled the old Mobo wich was failing and every thing worked video card was cool to touch and worked well, I sent Mobo #2 RMA for refund, and got the Gigabyte G1 Mobo, It also produced the same No video problem after I tried all the remedy's, Even tried a new video card to no avail, And with the Memory from the QVL list on both boards, Question: What am I doing wrong here I have the i7 920 proccessor with the ATI Radion HD 4800 with two 6 pin power connectors, and I always connected both to the old MSI Mobo that always worked when reassembled after the 3 Mobo's failed, I have a Antec 1200w power supply, I know these Mobo's need an external power hookup for the video card, and tried using only one or both to see if power was an issue, and still got nothing, all the lights for diag was coming on and going green for pass on the memory/CPU/Expansion (video) card,and indicated the processor and all other comonents were functioning, Butt!! No Video, Could the X58 chipset be at fault on both Mobo's, I need any input for this matter before the next Gigabyte Mobo #2 gets here to avoid Failure #4.... PS: the new video card is a G-force GTX 550 Ti...

Dude, it isn't your MOBO(S)! - it's your PSU! RMA -> " Antec 1200w power supply" Also, try the Stock HSF first before using any aftermarket HSF, and RMA the PSU before for destroy another MOBO, GPU, etc. Further, Breadboard the MOBO outside the case and verify 100% that ALL Standoff's are lined-up with the MOBO screw holes (move/remove) as needed.

Read:
Quote:
Example - "If you NEED 1 that works BUY 4"
The chances of a DOA MOBO, a real one, are about 1 in 50 or less. IF some bozo has 3 or more DOA then the 'builder' is taking an otherwise 'good MOBO' and 'killing it' themselves - 9/10 by shorting or bad PSU. - period!

See -> http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/299243-30-asus-p8p67l...
October 29, 2011 6:10:42 PM

jaquith said:
Dude, it isn't your MOBO(S)! - it's your PSU! RMA -> " Antec 1200w power supply" Also, try the Stock HSF first before using any aftermarket HSF, and RMA the PSU before for destroy another MOBO, GPU, etc. Further, Breadboard the MOBO outside the case and verify 100% that ALL Standoff's are lined-up with the MOBO screw holes (move/remove) as needed.

Read:
Quote:
Example - "If you NEED 1 that works BUY 4"
The chances of a DOA MOBO, a real one, are about 1 in 50 or less. IF some bozo has 3 or more DOA then the 'builder' is taking an otherwise 'good MOBO' and 'killing it' themselves - 9/10 by shorting or bad PSU. - period!

See -> http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/299243-30-asus-p8p67l...


Then what is the difference between the MSI Mobo and the other two Mfr's ASUS and Gigabyte, The video works on the MSI and not the others?
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 29, 2011 7:25:48 PM

If the MSI uses 4-pin CPU power, or doesn't have a User created short then it might work. What exact MSI and what exact differences have YOU done putting ALL of the MOBO's together?

Otherwise this is your problem -> "reassembled after the 3 Mobo's failed"
October 29, 2011 7:49:14 PM

jaquith said:
If the MSI uses 4-pin CPU power, or doesn't have a User created short then it might work. What exact MSI and what exact differences have YOU done putting ALL of the MOBO's together?

Otherwise this is your problem -> "reassembled after the 3 Mobo's failed"


The only difference is two standoffs, All Mobo's have 6 pin CPU power, And ATI GPU has 2 power connectors Vs G-force's 1 power connector, I have QVL RAM for all Mobo's and talked/diag 3 hrs with ASUS on the first two Mobo's each. I think its the X58 chipset giving me and the Mfr the problems, I love ASUS and MSI, This is my first Gigabyte product instalation and I read good reviews on it...
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 29, 2011 8:26:00 PM

The LGA 1366 ASUS P6T6 WS Revolution and Gigabyte G1 series and pretty much any LGA 1366 MOBO that comes to mind ALL use an 8 pin EPS +12 volt power cable {or 4+4 pin +12 volt power cable}. DO NOT use some 6 pin PCI Express power cable to power the CPU - the polarity is backwards!!!
October 29, 2011 9:00:54 PM

jaquith said:
The LGA 1366 ASUS P6T6 WS Revolution and Gigabyte G1 series and pretty much any LGA 1366 MOBO that comes to mind ALL use an 8 pin EPS +12 volt power cable {or 4+4 pin +12 volt power cable}. DO NOT use some 6 pin PCI Express power cable to power the CPU - the polarity is backwards!!!


My mistake it is an 8 pin connector and not 6. I'm thinking video power and not CPU ATX..
a c 222 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 29, 2011 9:07:28 PM

The G1.Assassin has 2 x 8-pin ATX 12V power connectors whereas the G1.Guerrilla and G1.Sniper only have one.
October 29, 2011 9:14:51 PM

ko888 said:
The G1.Assassin has 2 x 8-pin ATX 12V power connectors whereas the G1.Guerrilla and G1.Sniper only have one.


I have the G1 Guerrilla, and my RMA just reached Califoria wich means I will be getting the new Mobo in 7days. I will try to power the board up in the box to eliminate any metal issues and I have another 750 PSU to try incase the new Antec 1200w is garbage. any other tricks you have would be helpfull here as well, And thank you for the replies..
a c 222 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
October 29, 2011 9:29:20 PM

barilenator said:
I have the G1 Guerrilla, and my RMA just reached Califoria wich means I will be getting the new Mobo in 7days. I will try to power the board up in the box to eliminate any metal issues and I have another 750 PSU to try incase the new Antec 1200w is garbage. any other tricks you have would be helpfull here as well, And thank you for the replies..

Testing the motherboard outside of the case first is recommended to prove that the motherboard will POST so that you don't waste your time installing a faulty system.

Mis-wired front panel ports on the case that can cause a short is also a possibility.
October 29, 2011 9:36:06 PM

Thanks, the front panel ports are wired correctly but wil not connect them till later.
a c 717 V Motherboard
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
October 29, 2011 11:39:09 PM

If they're shorted same problem. Breadboard with the absolute minimum.
October 31, 2011 7:51:31 PM

This thread is much the same as those I read 12 years ago, and ever since then, when I first began building computers. I have only built about 8 rigs over the years, but all have served me well. Way back when we had to unlock AMD cpu’s with conductive materials to reconnect bridges on the chip so they could be o’clocked. We built our own water cooled cases using Chevette heater cores and fish tank pumps.

I stopped into this Forum to find out what was problematic regarding MB's, since my 5+ year old ASUS P5Wdh is getting a bit slow. It has been running stable and solid overclocked to 3.6 (which is slow these days) on an E6600.

Anyway back in the day, and from that day forward every mother board is hated or loved by many. There are exceptions, sometimes one comes along that is nearly flawless and others are hardly worth their weight in dirt. Some things never change.

Anyway I was looking at the power supply section here on this Forum and I often read: "what is the best power supply for cheap". Right off that is a bad place to start. Put a Yugo motor in a Vette and see how it all works out...

I am using the original PC Power and Cooling Power supply 750 watt, but I think that is too small for the new rig, my PCP&C's were built before OcZ took them over.

Anyway I wanted to know if anyone has an opinion of the ASUS P8Z68-V PRO? The CPU I am considering is the I5 2500K.
I think this time around I will run two video cards, never tried that before.

Link: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I am not much for Gigabyte boards, maybe they have improved since back in 2005, when they were the worst of the bunch.

sparx
!