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Best pay for $ antivirus?

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February 21, 2011 12:48:56 AM

Just built a new system and am looking to make sure my cc information and whatever stays safe while online and also that I dont get any trojans or whatever. So what do you guys recommend is the best for the $ anti virus?

More about : pay antivirus

February 21, 2011 1:06:59 AM

Best antivirus to keep your information safe and keep your system clean is you being aware of what you are doing. If you arent using your credit card on sketchy sites and browsing random websites you reduce your risk a ton.

I havent spent any money on antivirus software in years, i was using AVG for quite a while, switch to Avast recently, i like it a bit better but AVG was quite good too, both have treated my systems well and kept them nice and clean. Running Adblock with a good browser like firefox or chrome(IE is far from good) reduces your risk too especially in the sketchier areas of the internets.
February 21, 2011 1:09:25 AM

Agree with avast, I've been using it for years and their more recent one is a bit less resource intensive.

If you really want to pay for an AV, you could buy Avast pro to get addition features you will never use.
Related resources
February 21, 2011 2:09:20 AM

Avast , Avira, Microsoft Security Essentials and AVG are all free and pretty much as good as paid solutions. Paying I say Kaspersky.
February 21, 2011 3:02:03 AM

I have used AVG and Avast in the past, but I prefer Microsoft Security Essentials now. It is lightweight and unlike other freeware solutions, doesn't nag you to upgrade to the paid edition all the time. I don't really like any of the paid anti-virus solutions--they seem too bloated.
February 21, 2011 6:26:24 AM

Another vote for MSE. I will probably never use paid AV software again.
February 21, 2011 7:00:33 AM

I use Norton Security Suite it comes free with Comcast High-speed. I know a lot don't like Norton, but I have never had a problem with it. I have yet to get a virus with Norton installed, but like others have said if you stay away from bad sites then you will reduce the risk of infection a lot.
February 21, 2011 7:19:39 AM

The recent versions of Norton are pretty good, if you really want to pay for something (they used to suck, but they've become much, much better recently). MSE is pretty good though, and it's free.
February 21, 2011 11:17:21 AM

I've used payed versions of Norton and Kaspersky in the past as well as Avast.
Since the release of MSE i'll never use another AV.
Been virus free for 14 months using MSE and i'm not a safe surfer.
February 21, 2011 11:53:28 AM

Paying ZoneAlarm or Kaspersky, what you're really interested in is the firewall not anti-malware, the best protection is to prevent anything infecting you in the first place.
for a free firewall look into Komodo.
February 21, 2011 11:55:59 AM

hello

i am new here
February 21, 2011 1:56:37 PM

Herr_Koos said:
Another vote for MSE. I will probably never use paid AV software again.


A bit off topic, but am I the only one who has experienced periodic and random 100% on one core CPU usage with MSE? I've tried it on 3 different computers with windows 7 and had to uninstall and go back to Avast every time.

hrdf said:
hello

i am new here


Welcome. If you have a question, feel free to start a new thread.
February 21, 2011 4:18:43 PM

saaiello said:
I use Norton Security Suite it comes free with Comcast High-speed. I know a lot don't like Norton, but I have never had a problem with it. I have yet to get a virus with Norton installed, but like others have said if you stay away from bad sites then you will reduce the risk of infection a lot.


I also have Nortons free with Comcast and I back it up by doing manual scans with MalwareBytes.
I have had this setup for close to two years with no virus problems and I visit alot of dangerous sites.
I used to use AVG and Comodo but they were too annoying and I got my OS wiped out twice with that setup.

February 21, 2011 4:23:24 PM

enzo matrix said:
A bit off topic, but am I the only one who has experienced periodic and random 100% on one core CPU usage with MSE? I've tried it on 3 different computers with windows 7 and had to uninstall and go back to Avast every time.


No such problem for me; at least, not that I've noticed.
February 21, 2011 4:44:19 PM

king smp said:
I also have Nortons free with Comcast and I back it up by doing manual scans with MalwareBytes.
I have had this setup for close to two years with no virus problems and I visit alot of dangerous sites.
I used to use AVG and Comodo but they were too annoying and I got my OS wiped out twice with that setup.


1. Norton is just terrible, it does practically nothing, and negatively impacts your system. Never use it.

2. How the hell did you wipe your system :ouch:  I've spent a lot of time playing around with different security systems, malware testing, leak testing etc. and I can't say I've ever destroyed a system on account of the software, the malware I've played around with, sure, but the actual anti-virus system...?

3. They are 'annoying' if you don't have any security knowledge, but with some knowledge and effort to configure them they are entire inobtrusive and damn effective. Although AVG is no longer good at all.

4. http://www.matousec.com/projects/proactive-security-cha... Take a look at that - bear in mind the version of each application, for example the listed version of ZoneAlarm is not current, hence the bad performance, although they did have a duration over 2 years or so lacking in results they are improving again, reviews are conflicting regarding their product, which is understandable based on the fact that security constantly updates. From my experience it's very good, but that has a lot to do with the fact that I set up security in a paranoid fashion rather than leaving it be and seeing what it can do.
February 21, 2011 5:08:31 PM

Wampbit said:
1. Norton is just terrible, it does practically nothing, and negatively impacts your system. Never use it.

Have you used it in the past two years or so? It's gotten a LOT better recently.
February 21, 2011 5:12:48 PM

^ +1

Even though I stick with free anti virus I have read Norton is MUCH better than it was a few years ago. The comments on the page you linked to are 3 years old. That is like 50 tech years.lol
February 21, 2011 5:31:38 PM

Norton Corp. was great! Currently use MSE cause my Norton corp. licence ran out.
February 21, 2011 5:52:20 PM

Its true that Norton has got a lot better in recent times but id say you go with Kaspersky, its what i use and love it because it does everything (the ad blocker it has is decent).

F-secure and Avira are supposed to be really good aswell.
February 21, 2011 6:23:47 PM

@cjl - it's getting better, but it started very low, it still isn't at the top, and is bloated like hell. Although its latest performance as reported by anti-malware test lab ( http://www.anti-malware-test.com/ ) did positively surprise me.

I'm really curious as to how good MSE is, I haven't played with it yet, and I know that MS have really been improving lately (after our friends in the infosec community shouted at them for 15 years). Still, I'm not expecting too much when I eventually decide to play with it.
February 21, 2011 6:25:39 PM

If I had to pay, then Kaspersky without a doubt. That being said, no reason to not use MSE.
February 21, 2011 6:52:11 PM

If looking for AV, Malaware and Firewall, Zone Alarm Internet Security Suite @ $15 per PC is a bargain. With 6 PC's at home, not having to go around and manually to all the updates as I had to do w/ the freebies is easily worth it.

For AV only, F-Prot at $6 per PC for a home license of 5 puters is another popular option.
February 21, 2011 6:59:16 PM

Two words: AVG FREE.

Paid antivirus only include a bunch of gimmick features you'll never use and won't make your computer less vunnerable.
February 21, 2011 7:10:03 PM

Nonsense wiini, to start with AVG is terribly outdated now, it had its day, which is long gone. Secondly there is a difference between paid services and free services, most significantly in usability - you can get plenty of good free security solutions that have the prerequisite of good compsec knowledge, but good free and easy to use are very hard to find.

The paid versions are often the best and offer significant improvements over free products, especially regarding keeping at the top. If you take the free route the solution at the top of the game is always changing, and really requires you to keep an eye on when you need to change your installed software. You can reproduce the effects of a paid suite, but it's harder and takes much more effort. TBH I value my time more than to look around at the free stuff - it can easily take 2-3 hours to find the best free software for anti-malware, then firewall, then anti-rootkit, then OS-firewall, and even longer to configure. Following which time has to be spent periodically making sure your solution is still viable. Frankly for £45 I'll buy a good suite, which I know has been at the top for over 5 years, and actively updates to combat new threats.

The time spent looking for free good security reminds me a bit of spending an extra 15 minutes in a shop because an item was scanned at £1 more than the listed price due to some error in the system. The 15 minutes simply is worth more than the money saved.
February 21, 2011 7:54:01 PM

+1 avast: (got viruses with avira, avg)

don't buy ativirus: they slow down computers and they can't block most nasty viruses.

I install avast on all of my costumer's machine and they rarely catch any viruses. Only the one that download illegal stuff and such
February 21, 2011 8:08:54 PM

Quote:
Snip


I think you speak a lot of truth there. It's about prevention rather than post-infection solutions.

Firstly noscript: this is the salt of the earth. I remember the old days of ZA, when every single website was logged, and it acted as noscript but for all browsers, blocking javascript and all, allowing you to individually allow specific scripts from specific server. It was awful to use, took forever to configure, but you were very secure. I really do believe that noscript goes a long way so long as you don't allow all the scripts on every website you go on! I know many people who simply 'temporarily allow all' on every website.

Next: Don't run admin! Once again completely true. Do you log onto root when running a linux system? NO! The admin account isn't there for every-day use. It takes no time at all to switch users when installing software, it's a worthwhile time sink.

2: If any computer on your network is insecure - you are insecure. Once again I've seen a ton of people who don't know how they're getting viruses. Often someone else on their home network is not secured as they should be, and they aren't running network security so they can easily use printers and other shared devices. Make sure you have good local network security, and make special cases for your shared media, considering the vulnerability in a per case bases.

3: I think Komodo is a fantastic example of a great free security suite. Although I didn't see any sophisticated OS firewall, it certainly functioned well as an internet firewall; returning to the first point, prevention is fundamental, firewall is the most important part. However, there is no way to avoid that fact that configuring Komodo takes significant knowledge, especially when it comes to actively responding to alerts - this is lessened in some suites, but I'd say on a general note it's required to use any suite well. I see your point about the testers being paid by companies, and I don't deny it at all. The listing I trust the most is matousec (posted it earlier), they are good at keeping track of free and paid services alike.

4: Rootkits - I don't really see anti-rootkit as a feature. If I'm going to be honest, it's hard as hell to detect them via software, and it's near impossible to remove them. The majority of the times I've definitely nuked against a rootkit.

I agree that malwarebytes is a must. I think the end all for compsec is common sense and not taking the easy route. Get yourself a good firewall, don't turn it off if it's irritating, just learn how to use it and configure it. Don't run any form of super-user account. Look for vulnerabilities. And be paranoid!

It's alarming that malware infections are rising at a higher rate than ever before, it just takes some sense and information to protect yourselves against them, and if you're an active computer user it really isn't an optional thing. My security methods have meant that on my main computer (used for finance, gaming, work, just the general horse) hasn't been infected once over the last 10 years. It's not a magical feat of luck, or much hard work, it's just being smart and keeping up to date.
February 21, 2011 9:09:47 PM

Wampbit said:
1. Norton is just terrible, it does practically nothing, and negatively impacts your system. Never use it.

2. How the hell did you wipe your system :ouch:  I've spent a lot of time playing around with different security systems, malware testing, leak testing etc. and I can't say I've ever destroyed a system on account of the software, the malware I've played around with, sure, but the actual anti-virus system...?

3. They are 'annoying' if you don't have any security knowledge, but with some knowledge and effort to configure them they are entire inobtrusive and damn effective. Although AVG is no longer good at all.

4. http://www.matousec.com/projects/proactive-security-cha... Take a look at that - bear in mind the version of each application, for example the listed version of ZoneAlarm is not current, hence the bad performance, although they did have a duration over 2 years or so lacking in results they are improving again, reviews are conflicting regarding their product, which is understandable based on the fact that security constantly updates. From my experience it's very good, but that has a lot to do with the fact that I set up security in a paranoid fashion rather than leaving it be and seeing what it can do.


1) funny in a couple of new reviews Nortons is rated as number one for paid software (consumer reports and I think PCWorld)
2) I should say running avg and comodo I had the OS wiped out not the system
3) I have owned a computer since 1981 and I am a A+ tech who makes a living repairing/refurbing computers plus a maintenance contract with a private school
4) Have you had the new Nortons Security Suite installed? Runs awesome of course alot of computer "experts" dont think any software that is paid for is any good. Most noobies in the beginning always try to use something besides the MS applications (IE8,MSOffice etc) or other big name software titles thinking that makes them "elite". After doing this for more than twenty years
I can tell you stick with MS,Adobe,Nortons etc. These companies literally spend millions and millions on R and D on their products.
February 22, 2011 2:22:36 AM

I've been using the free version of AVG for over 5 years without a single problem, and I've never had to reformat because of a virus infecting my system but it's always I that f*ck it up for messing with system files and registry, and not having system recovery enabled, but AVG has been doing it's job as it should.
February 22, 2011 2:58:45 AM

No I got the virus while having AVG8 installed.
Its been roughly two years so hard to remember but I believe the virus was Vundo.
February 22, 2011 3:02:44 AM

Kind of hard to remember since I have tried AVG,Avast,Avira,Comodo and other I cant remember anymore.
I have pretty much tried everything including McAfee and found out that Nortons Security suite backed up with manual MalwareBytes scan works the BEST FOR ME.
It really is personal preference for the most part
February 22, 2011 3:25:30 AM

Now everybody who goes to social sites are getting hit with KoobFace
And I did not know that Intel owns McAfee.
Learn something new everyday
February 22, 2011 3:50:49 AM

I find it funny people saying Norton slows down the system too much. This used to be true maybe 5 10 years ago, but with systems being alot faster and Norton becoming alot less of a resource hog it has become a great AV. I see alot saying get 1 for this and 1 for that I would be willing to bet getting all those freeware AVs slows your system down more then Norton. Not to mention all the time wasted looking for all these free programs. With Norton I install it and forget it and that's it I have not had a virus ever using Norton I can't say the same for those free AV's out, but maybe that has changed in the past few years I have been using Norton.

February 22, 2011 4:09:19 AM

saaiello said:
I find it funny people saying Norton slows down the system too much. This used to be true maybe 5 10 years ago, but with systems being alot faster and Norton becoming alot less of a resource hog it has become a great AV. I see alot saying get 1 for this and 1 for that I would be willing to bet getting all those freeware AVs slows your system down more then Norton. Not to mention all the time wasted looking for all these free programs. With Norton I install it and forget it and that's it I have not had a virus ever using Norton I can't say the same for those free AV's out, but maybe that has changed in the past few years I have been using Norton.


^+1 very true
February 22, 2011 4:59:59 AM

Well I have been using Norton for about 3 1\2 years now and I have yet to have a problem. No maleware, rootkits all of that good stuff gets blocked at the worst I still get tracking cookies, but it still finds them almost immediately and removes them.
February 22, 2011 10:40:21 PM

I and a friend and a customer all had a virus while using MSE. For me I was testing it on my test box :)  but my customer wasn't happy at all; luckily it was easy to clean. I haven't tried the new version recently released. And Enzo, you are not alone in the CPU usae thing.

In all my years I have concluded that there is no such thing as a great antivirus, only good and worse. I have come to use 3 machines. My gaming rig, the wifes/kids/grandkids pc, and my bill$ pc which only connects to specific sites once a month and not on the same network as the other pc's. Most free AV's are good enough for me combined with rootkit detection. I tell ya rootkits are going to be way worse than any virus...
February 23, 2011 1:11:56 PM

popatim said:
my bill$ pc which only connects to specific sites once a month and not on the same network as the other pc's.

WOW I have never heard of somebody having a specfic computer just to pay bills paranoid much?
February 23, 2011 4:14:58 PM

I think Norton's 2011 basic user protection is a great paid for AV. It hardly uses of my computer resources and does a great job at protecting my PC. Also they have free support to fix your Norton product if you can't.
February 23, 2011 5:18:57 PM

If you are going to pay for a antivirus then the latest Nortons is the way to go.
I remember Consumer Reports a few months ago picked it as best paid for AV.
I have a Core2Duo and Nortons doesnt slow it down.
They have a CPU usage based scanner so if the CPU is idle it does it scans and if you
are using the computer it stops scanning.
Also the security suite has a decent firewall and network monitor plus has a automated backup system of files and automated system maintenance tools which
are especially nice if you have XP since they arent built in like Win7.
February 23, 2011 5:53:01 PM

mrmotion said:
Norton Corp. was great! Currently use MSE cause my Norton corp. licence ran out.


Same here.. Norton products have been excellent post 2009.. However, MSE being free and awesome, I don't see the need to pay for anything else.. Paid for windows 7 anyway, so why not use all the benefits available..
February 23, 2011 6:12:23 PM

If I didn't get Norton for free through my ISP then I would most likely be using MSE I have heard nothing but good things about it.
February 23, 2011 7:19:07 PM

Emperus said:
Same here.. Norton products have been excellent post 2009.. However, MSE being free and awesome, I don't see the need to pay for anything else.. Paid for windows 7 anyway, so why not use all the benefits available..


If I didnt get Nortons free with my ISP (Comcast) I would also go with MSE and just do manual scans with MalwareBytes free edition.
I always like having a real time anti-virus backed up with a good manual scanner just because between the two different virus
definition libraries usually will catch anything.
Also Sophos Anti-rootkit is freeware and is good to run occasionally along with the real time and manual scanner.
If you use all three MSE or Nortons,MalwareBytes and Sophos and you still get a virus then you didnt stand
a chance anyway :D 
February 23, 2011 7:32:46 PM

If you really want to be paranoid then using Virtual Box from Oracle (free) and setting up a Virtual Machine on a seperate hard drive and use that for browsing and downloading
is the way to go.
If the VM gets wiped out you just reinstall from a image back to an earlier time.
I like to use Windows XP since I still have a license for it and plus if there are any old programs that Win7 doesnt run (not many) then you have good Ole Trusty XP plus
it is light on resource usage which is good for a VM.
February 25, 2011 6:30:00 AM

allkindsoftime said:
Just built a new system and am looking to make sure my cc information and whatever stays safe while online and also that I dont get any trojans or whatever. So what do you guys recommend is the best for the $ anti virus?


I tried Quick Heal it's comparatively cheaper and they also have some schemes or something going on so you can also get free subscription for upto 6 months I guess ... if you are interested then you can check their website...www.quickheal.com
February 26, 2011 6:31:13 PM

I am using Norton 360 Version 4.0. Works great and does not slow down my PC. :) 
February 26, 2011 6:37:28 PM

Wampbit said:
Paying ZoneAlarm or Kaspersky, what you're really interested in is the firewall not anti-malware, the best protection is to prevent anything infecting you in the first place.
for a free firewall look into Komodo.


A firewall doesn't stop malware from getting onto a computer.... Firewalls prevent unwanted connections to/from the computer. Seeing as how every day more malware appears with the ability to disable Antivirus and Firewall software, it would be rather reckless to have just 1.
February 26, 2011 6:45:57 PM

Favorite free: "Avira", "Avast"

Favorite paid: "Nod32", "Kaspersky"

Will I ever pay for an anti-virus? Not likely.

Anti Virus isn't enough. You need anti spyware/malware scanners such as "Malwarebytes" and "SuperAntiSpyware". Get both (the free versions work fine, you'll just have to update and scan manually [and the scan part you'll want to do anyways] from time to time) and you'll be good to go!

Windows' included firewall is plenty for most users btw. Oh yeah, and its free!
February 26, 2011 7:04:21 PM

saaiello said:
WOW I have never heard of somebody having a specfic computer just to pay bills paranoid much?


About 10yrs ago my wife was a victum of identity theft, credit card fraud... All because one of my kids wanted to win $50 and no one mentioned the 'odd behavior' of the computer until it was too late.

It took years to straighten all that out. And they say the best defense is a good offense... A perfect use for an old pc imo.
February 26, 2011 7:33:44 PM

popatim said:
About 10yrs ago my wife was a victum of identity theft, credit card fraud... All because one of my kids wanted to win $50 and no one mentioned the 'odd behavior' of the computer until it was too late.

It took years to straighten all that out. And they say the best defense is a good offense... A perfect use for an old pc imo.


^^ Agreed.

Watched my father go through over $20,000 of credit trouble due to someone opening a Home Depot/Lowes account in Colorado (in his name, of course).

With all the scary security holes out there it's a good idea to use a system for business, and a system for fun. (especially if there are other computer users in the house)

They're still having problems and we're nearly half a decade down the road now. They had their credit completely frozen for nearly a year.
!