Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

1155 vs 1366

Last response: in CPUs
Share
February 23, 2011 1:11:36 AM

Hello,
I am building a new gaming computer, and I have this question; Now that we know that the 1155 sandy bridge will be the best upgrade path for non 1366 cpu's (after the fix), and that the 2600k looks like it out performs the 960. What will be the best upgrade path for the future, 1155 or 1366?

More about : 1155 1366

Best solution

a b à CPUs
February 23, 2011 1:33:15 AM

I think all reports are that the LGA 1366 is a 'dead socket'. LGA 2011 will be replacing it by the end of the year. LGA1155 will at least 'live' into the Ivy Bridge. I'm not sure what socket Haswell will be using. Being an 8-core, its more likely that the quad-channel RAM on LGA2011 will be needed... but I haven't heard anything solid yet.

In the grand scheme of things... look at how often you'll upgrade. If it won't be for 2 or 3 years plus, then I probably would expect to have to buy a new chip, motherboard, and maybe (DDR4?) RAM. If that's the case, you could go either path and build a strong system. If you're doing something that takes advantage of the triple channel RAM, then LGA1366 might be better. Otherwise, like you mention, the LGA1155 is very capable in most areas.
Share
February 23, 2011 1:40:38 AM

1155.
Except the 990X and 980X no other CPU on 1366 stands a chance against the 2600K. Also Ivy Bridge will also be on 1155 so I guess 1155 is a clear winner.

Btw since computer is mainly for gaming consider the 2500K as games don't really take advantage of the Hyper-Threading.
m
0
l
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
February 23, 2011 1:47:36 AM

If your gaming and plan on going with more than one video card...perhaps 1366 is more ideal..more mature, stable platform..2 video cards will run @ 16x instead of 1155's 8x...although it doesn't have a huge impact on performance...If you don't upgrade often, best to go with 1155 if you can't wait...
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 2:23:39 AM

asantesoul said:
If your gaming and plan on going with more than one video card...perhaps 1366 is more ideal..more mature, stable platform..2 video cards will run @ 16x instead of 1155's 8x...although it doesn't have a huge impact on performance...If you don't upgrade often, best to go with 1155 if you can't wait...


explain 16x vs 8x. Isn't 1155 better anyway?
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 2:43:06 AM

i was really really close to buying the 1156 or 1366 socket yesterday on my new build...but i ended up not buying it because of that ivy bridge reason :) ....im glad i didn't buy it...if your thinking of building a new pc i would suggest you stay away from any pc hardware or you'll end up itching to buy like me lol...just wait till they re-release 1155 motherboards...
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 2:44:54 AM

Quote:
1366 is a dead socket. There will be no more chips
1155 gets 28nm Ivy Bridge Processors in Q1 of 2012


hey psycho you have any idea how much the ivy bridge processors are going to be? i was thinking of just getting a i5 2500k for now and save up for a ivy bridge cpu when they come out...
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 4:39:22 AM

Quote:
1366 is a dead socket. There will be no more chips
1155 gets 28nm Ivy Bridge Processors in Q1 of 2012


Seems to be a typo there. Ivy Bridge processors will be 22 nm.
m
0
l
February 23, 2011 5:23:09 AM

Although 1366 is considered a dead socket...doesn't take away from what I can and has accomplished since its debut...believe me, owning sandy bridge for some people is purely psychological...most people just want the "new" stuff and won't even utilize the power...if you really don't know what to get then wait...however if theres something you want..go ahead and get it..

The important thing is you get something YOU like and stop looking at other peoples rigs...everyone has opinions and preferences..find yours and be done with it
m
0
l
a c 199 à CPUs
February 23, 2011 4:20:06 PM

xstalkrx said:
explain 16x vs 8x. Isn't 1155 better anyway?


1366 allows PCI-E to function at x16 with 2 or more cards. 1155 is limits PCI-E to x8 x8 when 2 or ore cards are used. However, one option for 1155 is to ad an NF200 chipset to the MoBo which will provide the x16 x16 PCI-E bandwidth that some enthusiasts will be looking for. The Asus WS Revolution is one such board.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-overcloc...

Quote:
Is there any reason for a gamer to go with a Core i7-900-series CPU/X58 motherboard combo, now that Sandy bridge has arrived? While the new Core i7-2000 series is faster than the Core i7-900-series from a processing standpoint, the platform can be a factor. The new LGA 1155 processors have an inherent limit of 16 PCIe lanes for graphics use (the same limit that LGA 1156 processors suffered), so if a gamer plans to use three or more graphics cards in CrossFire or SLI, we have to ask if Bloomfield/Gulftown and X58 offer the potential for more performance?

No! In theory, the current ultimate gaming platform (until Intel releases the LGA 2011 interface in the second half of this year) would be a P67 chipset paired with the NF200 bridge. Our experience with the LGA 1156 chipset paired with the NF200 bridge indicates that a P67/NF200 combo would allow us to use the fastest Sandy Bridge CPUs available in conjunction with three or four graphics cards without noticable graphics bandwidth trade-offs. In fact, we already have a story in the works that should prove this definitively.



m
0
l
February 25, 2011 11:10:32 PM

So if I have 560's in SLI on a 1366 and 560's in SLI on an 1155.... the cards will perform better and I will get better FPS and general performance on the 1366 because of the x8 bandwith issue on the 1155? This conclusion does not seem accurate.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
February 25, 2011 11:23:59 PM

It's accurate ... but only in certain situations.

If you're using a single-monitor resolution like 2560x1200 and using dual-card SLI/CF, P67 is just as good as x58.

If you're using a multi-monitor resolution like 5760x1200 and/or using more than two cards in SLI/CF, X58 wins out.

However, even at 5760x1200 with dual-card SLI, X58's advantage was only 7% and only in one game (they tested three games). Source: HardOCP x16/x16 versus x8/x8 article
m
0
l
February 26, 2011 12:01:25 AM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
It's accurate ... but only in certain situations.

If you're using a single-monitor resolution like 2560x1200 and using dual-card SLI/CF, P67 is just as good as x58.

If you're using a multi-monitor resolution like 5760x1200 and/or using more than two cards in SLI/CF, X58 wins out.

However, even at 5760x1200 with dual-card SLI, X58's advantage was only 7% and only in one game (they tested three games). Source: HardOCP x16/x16 versus x8/x8 article


Thanks for the link, definitly puts the mind at ease. Who would have thought the x16 x16 would perform the same as x8 x8? Just doesnt make sense. I won't be using a multi-monitor setup so I will stick with a mobo that offers the x8 x8 bandwith.
m
0
l
March 7, 2011 11:43:41 PM

Best answer selected by JED49.
m
0
l
July 8, 2012 3:57:42 AM

When I was buying motherboard all sites were writing that socket 1366 is future proof. Its sad that future proof only for about 2 years.
m
0
l
!