Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Need new gaming pc build advice--

Last response: in Systems
Share
December 2, 2010 7:24:42 PM

Hello,

It has been over 4+ years for since I built a gaming pc and each time I do it I pretty much start with no knowledge because of the time elapsed and the technology advanced... Haha..
Anyhow, I just need the box itself, I'll get a new monitor/keyboard/mouse and such afterwards based on budget.
I was hoping to keep in range of 800-1000 just for the core part. I looked some builds up and found something to start with but I dont understand if the extra upgrade is worth the money for some components (ill ask as i go). I am not biased to intel/amd or anything like that, just performance and durability (need it to last another 3 years or so or my wife will kill me :)  )

So, here is what I found another site that was close to my budget and wanted thoughts (even complete revamp advice is appreciated). This is for gaming (ex Black Ops-- also play MMORPGS but they are lower intense)

CPU
* i5-760 2.8ghz lga1156 95w quad
or
*i7-870 2.93ghz lga 1156 95w quad HT

MOTHERBOARD
*ASRock p55 extreme4 cf 8x/8x sata 6gbs usb 3.0
or
*ASUS Maximus III Formula w/Sound Card

VIDEO CARD(s)
*MSI Hawk GeForce GTX 460 1GB
or
* (2) Geforce GTX 460 768MB in SLI

------I'll stop there for now because it is my main question point

I read in some place that the dual vid card could perform as fast as some of the top video cards, but also read in other places that the 1156 set (remember I have no idea what im talking about, just tryin to regurgitate stuff i read that i know nothing of) without the 16x channel gives little upgrade for the price?
Do i need to upgrade the motherboard and chip set to bother with the SLI dual vid cards (which I cant afford I think). At which point is the i7 chip much of an upgrade for me from the i5? Should I just go with the i5 and the single vid card? OR is there a much better setup to go for the same costs....

Other components
HARD DRIVE
I would like a terabyte...
Should I go
Samsung f3 1TB SATA II 3.0
or
2 Samsung 500gb f3 sata II in a raid 0?

RAM
wanted 8GB (just lookin ahead in 3 years)
so maybe
g skill 8gb (2x4gb) ddr3 1333 mgz 1.5v
or
is the same with 1600mhz worth the extra 30 dollars or so?


Think that is all my random thoughts, not even sure I explained my concerns well, but it's a start...
Can anyone straighten me out?

Thanks,
Travis

More about : gaming build advice

December 2, 2010 7:41:03 PM

Wait till Jan, 2011 for new Intel CPU's and by that time we will have new GPU's from AMD as well. If you want to ensure your system to run for longer time then wait a bit.
m
0
l
December 2, 2010 7:58:51 PM

mianmars said:
Wait till Jan, 2011 for new Intel CPU's and by that time we will have new GPU's from AMD as well. If you want to ensure your system to run for longer time then wait a bit.


Will it be in the same price range as the i5/i7s that I listed? I was hoping to keep that cpu/motherboard combo around 400 or so
m
0
l
Related resources
a b 4 Gaming
December 2, 2010 8:23:51 PM

they are supposed to be
m
0
l
December 2, 2010 8:26:50 PM

@Wolfspawn they will replace the current i5/i7 line up so there will be multiple budget CPU's.
m
0
l
December 2, 2010 9:10:39 PM

ok.... if not then i'll just be waiting 2 more months for the same pc because I cant really spend much more. anyhow, is there any insight to using a SLI dual video card (the ones i referenced) with the i5 or i7 cpu and the listed mobo? i read conflicting reviews on it
m
0
l
December 3, 2010 1:47:57 AM

SLI on 1156 is totally fine as long as the motherboard 1. Supports it and 2. Has at least x8/x8 for the slots, like the motherboards you linked do.

That said, I would wait for sandy bridge, because the prices will be the same and the performance will be higher.
m
0
l
December 3, 2010 2:56:51 AM

duk3 said:
SLI on 1156 is totally fine as long as the motherboard 1. Supports it and 2. Has at least x8/x8 for the slots, like the motherboards you linked do.

That said, I would wait for sandy bridge, because the prices will be the same and the performance will be higher.


Thanks duk3, I read something about sandy bridge, is that also coming January? this is killing me... been trying to play COD BO, and i basically have to reboot my pc to exit the game... no other FPS before this has caused me problems but I am in dire need of an upgrade, haha. ty for the info, that is the kind of answer I was looking for
m
0
l
December 3, 2010 3:46:31 AM

Sandy Bridge is going to be released on January 5th, I would wait for it just because there is an upgrade potential later for 22nm CPUs along with higher performance, unlike 1156/1366.

Are all your settings at minimum?
m
0
l
December 3, 2010 5:03:43 AM

duk3 said:
Sandy Bridge is going to be released on January 5th, I would wait for it just because there is an upgrade potential later for 22nm CPUs along with higher performance, unlike 1156/1366.

Are all your settings at minimum?



i think so... im at a 3-4 year old PC, lol. i read some config posts and tried to minimize it the best i could... i guess i could play wow til january, but i would be really upset if the time comes and all the new components are more expensive...
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
December 3, 2010 3:52:29 PM

You do not list what you are coming from, e.g. your video card and monitor resolution, or whether or not you will be re-using any parts.
Benchmarks show pretty conclusively that in most games, Intel CPUs outperform AMD chips; one would hope so, as they also cost a lot more. The real question though is, Does it matter? For example, to go from 20-30 FPS is a big deal, but to go from 60-90 FPS, which is the same relative difference, may not be.
If saving money is a goal, you may find that a mid-range AMD CPU (like a 740BE or 955BE) may offer all the performance you need. A good comparative benchmark tool is at http://www.anandtech.com/bench/CPU/2
The same is true for the video card. At a resolution up to 1920x1080, you may be entirely satisfied with a single 1GB GTX460. I've been using an even weaker HD5770 at that resolution on my games (e.g. Guild Wars), and been perfectly satisfied. In any case, a single video card uses less power, generates less heat, involves less cable clutter, and has fewer driver issues than a multi-card setup.
(I've not seen the cause clarified, i.e. CPU vs. chipset issues, but it is worth a note that Intel CPUs seem to handle multiple high-end GPUs much better than AMD CPUs; while the Intel vs. AMD difference may be unimportant for any one card, two top-of-the-line GPUs apparently need an Intel CPU / mobo to reach their best performance).
While I would not suggest buying only the minimum performance you need today, I don't think it makes sense to buy too much either. Confirm it with benchmarks of the games you play, but I suspect a single HD6850 or HD5850 on a Crossfire mobo, or a single GTX460 on a SLI mobo, would be good starting points. You can add the second GPU in a year or two if needed.
Choose a quality PSU for your build. To allow for a second video card, you may want 750W, otherwise 500W-550W is sufficient. A quality PSU has full range active PFC (no little voltage switch) and 80+ certification. I am partial to Antec and Seasonic, but most Corsair (except "Builder"), Enermax, and XFX are also good.
m
0
l
!