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ASUS Sabertooth X58 + Intel Core i7-980X?

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December 4, 2010 11:11:08 PM

I'm rebuilding my computer and planning to use the ASUS Sabertooth X58, Intel Core i7-980X, and G.SKILL PI 12GB (6 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory (F3-12800CL6T2-12GBPIS) as the backbone to the build. My operating system and programs will be on a Corsair P128 SSD Drive.

My question is the memory I have chossen a good fit with the board I'm using and the CPU? If not what G.Skill memory would you recomend?

I know the board is tripple channel and I like the fact the memory is CAS 6 that is why I chose this memory. I will be editing multiple 1080p HD video tracks so I wanted to have more than 6GB.

Also, NewEgg sells this memory (12GB together) for about $400 but I could buy 3 packs of the G.SKILL PI 4GB (2 x 2GB) for $95 each making it less than $300. Is there any issue in buying the memory like this in three separate packs?
December 5, 2010 1:24:59 AM

The memory will be compatible. It will work with everything. But more people on this forum will recommend that you don't max out your memory slots. If you can afford it by the 12GB, because the memory will run faster if you don't fill all your memory slots.
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December 5, 2010 4:41:33 AM

dknutson said:
I would use the EVGA x58 FTW 3x SLI mobo instead....
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I chose this motherboard because I wanted the rear eSata port that I could hot swap a drive from. It is my understanding that if I use an eSATA Data Internal to External Slot Plate I can't hot swap the drive attached is that right?

Based on some of the other features I was looking for it narrowed it down to this ASUS board and few others, but the Gigabyte boards did not appear to support the 1600 memory standard to which I had my eye on the G.Skill memory that is CL 6 and 1600 memory standard.
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December 5, 2010 5:03:24 AM

mk-ultra said:
The memory will be compatible. It will work with everything. But more people on this forum will recommend that you don't max out your memory slots. If you can afford it by the 12GB, because the memory will run faster if you don't fill all your memory slots.


You say "If you can afford it buy the 12GB, because the memory will run faster if you don't fill all your memory slots." But the 12GB comes in 6 sticks of 2GB which will fill all 6 slots on the board. Are you saying that with this configuration that my 12GB memory is some how going to be slower than the 1600MHz Capability of these sticks or some how slower then its full potential?

This is the only tripple channel set up I saw above 6GB.

Is some how [G.SKILL PI 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3] faster than [G.SKILL PI 12GB (6 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3] because it is not filling all 6 DIMMs?
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December 5, 2010 6:31:12 AM

1600mhz ram works on all boards I'm running my mushkins at 1600 on my gigabyte board. God knows why they say it isn't supported because it really is.

I don't really understand why you want the sabertooth though. Most motherboards include eSATA and you should be able to hot swap. IMO the sabertooth is a bit underkill for a 980x.

And yes filling all slots can cause problems but it shouldn't. Depends on the memory, motherboard and all the other variables. You can get a 3X4gb kit though http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also sandy bridge is around the corner if you can hold out another month then do that.
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December 5, 2010 10:20:21 PM

^ +1 for somebody. if you can wait for sandy bridge do that. it will be worth the wait, and asus offers a Sabertooth motherboard that is compatible with the new intel CPU's.
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December 6, 2010 4:20:45 AM

mk-ultra said:
^ +1 for somebody. if you can wait for sandy bridge do that. it will be worth the wait, and asus offers a Sabertooth motherboard that is compatible with the new intel CPU's.


yeah but thats a weird little mobo though I mean seriously a covered mobo?(shouldn't influence the quality though)

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/motherboards/2010/11/1...
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December 7, 2010 11:54:29 PM

The cover can be taken off, if the user wants to.
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December 29, 2010 2:05:59 AM

:hello:  @HANOVER

Let me explain to you the situation with populating your motherboard's RAM slots.

Since these guys apparently have not been able to give you a PROPER explanation...

This is a matter of memory DENSITY. It is always best to use the least number of memory sticks as possible. The reason for that is because the more actual, physical sticks of memory you install on the board, the more you stress the memory controller. Each stick of memory requires it's own supply of voltage.

For example: Most DDR3 memory sticks use anywhere between 1.5v to 1.65v of voltage from the memory controller. The memory controller only has so much to give...

Not to say that the memory controller won't handle the number of sticks that you use. But the problem is that the more voltage you're using, the more potential there is for the memory controller to become unstable. The memory controller will also generate more heat.

These issues become most evident if you're overclocking. Especially when increasing the frequency of the memory...which requires more voltage to the memory.

So what they said was that it slows it down. NO. It does NOT slow it down. The memory will not be slowed down because you're using more memory sticks. The memory will always run at it's rated speed.

So you solve this problem...by using LESS sticks of memory at larger capacities. This is just good practice when building a system.

For example:

Let's say you're using the ASUS Sabertooth x58. (Which is the same board I am building with.)

Say you want to have 12GB of memory. (Why? No point, really.)

Instead of using 6 sticks of 2GB, you want to use 3 higher density sticks of 4GB.

By the way... Something I have recently learned... You do NOT have to use triple channel. You may use only two slots in dual-channel mode if you like.

So... I myself have finally chosen to go with a 6GB triple-channel kit with lower latencies running at 7-8-7-20. I see no reason to have more than 6GB at this time. I can not see any real justification for using 12GB unless you're doing heavy video editing or 3D rendering. (Even then, I question 12GB... Which is more practical in high-traffic servers if you ask me.)

Also... You've probably found yourself wrapped up in trying to decide on a higher speed memory... Possibly you've been thinking about going with higher-speed memory for the sake of being able to tighten the memory latency.

DO NOT pound your head into the ground like I did. The QVL (compatibility) lists are USELESS as they don't test very much of the product available out there anyway...and they don't get updated very often. The RAM should work JUST FINE with the board. Average latency now for DDR3 memory is 9-9-9-24 at 1600MHz. The Sabertooth x58 can handle latency and speeds well enough that you should not worry about this. The board has a button that you can press to set the memory to compatible parameters should you need to run in a failsafe mode anyway.

Another thing to keep in mind... The actual rated bus speed of the i7-series processor for the DDR3 memory is 1066MHz. Any frequency of memory above that is considered an overclock. The median now seems to be 1600MHz...which is already overclocked. Much more than that is really considered a waste. Even by the majority of enthusiasts out there.

That is to say; the i7-980X is a HUGE waste of money. That is unless you're looking for bragging rights and are willing to pay the ridiculous amount of cash Intel is asking for it. Consider the i7-950 instead. Compare their stats... I used this site for reference regarding your processor.

You can see that what I'm saying is true: http://ark.intel.com/Compare.aspx?ids=37150,47932

Now assuming you're paying attention and looking at the stats, you can see that the i7-980x does have certain advantages over the i7-950. Rated QPI speed is higher. The cache is a little bigger.

Fine. But most of the advantages are made useless by the fact that there isn't much software out there yet that can utilize all of those advantages. Not unless you're focusing on software that uses multiple cores anyway.

Anyway... Back to memory.

The kit I'm going with is 7-8-7-20 at 1600MHz using 1.65v per stick. This should do just fine. For gaming or otherwise. (I have no interest in overclocking.)

Here is the kit I have decided on:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Other good kits that I had been considering:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
OR
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


If you're insistent on 12GB (which seems to force you to sacrified a little latency UNLESS you spend much higher on the dollar):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
OR
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
OR
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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Well... Hope this helps you make an efficient decision. This information is a compilation of the information that I've gathered for the last 3-4 weeks of research now. (Building a new system with the ASUS Sabertooth x58 board myself. I'm a veteran builder...but haven't been able to build for 7 years now. Life has not permitted me the resources to... So I'm catching up on newer tech.)

Let me know what you come up with.
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