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How far can i OC amd athlon II 450 w/o voltage increase

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March 4, 2011 8:46:40 PM

and it still being stable? what do you guys think?
a c 900 à CPUs
a c 360 À AMD
March 4, 2011 8:51:37 PM

That is going to be based on the individual chip. Some clock higher than others therefore impossible to guess.
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March 4, 2011 9:25:35 PM

what is like a pretty much certain safe oc? is 3.4 pretty much safe for any chip?
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March 4, 2011 9:29:24 PM

Often you can reach up to 10% overclock without volt increase, 3.4 would fall under that.
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March 4, 2011 9:35:34 PM

^+1 it just depends on your CPU and motherboard.

15% is not out of the question, but it less likely you get to %20 and beyond without setting a higher voltage. Just make sure all the cores are able to do Prim 95 without errors for an hour or so.
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March 4, 2011 9:38:16 PM

megamanx00 said:
^+1 it just depends on your CPU and motherboard.

15% is not out of the question, but it less likely you get to %20 and beyond without setting a higher voltage. Just make sure all the cores are able to do Prim 95 without errors for an hour or so.


what is prim 95?
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March 4, 2011 9:39:22 PM

my roommate has had a successful OC of 40% for 2 years now w/o voltage increase so i guess he just got really lucky
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a c 900 à CPUs
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March 4, 2011 9:40:59 PM

Prime95 is a stress testing program to test if your system is stable! You can download it free on the web.
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March 4, 2011 9:52:31 PM

ill check that out, thanks!
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April 9, 2011 12:59:12 PM

was this thread about x3 or x2?
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a c 117 à CPUs
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April 11, 2011 8:03:04 PM

megamanx00 said:
^+1 it just depends on your RAMs and motherboard.

15% is not out of the question, but it less likely you get to %20 and beyond without setting a higher voltage. Just make sure all the cores are able to do Prim 95 without errors for an hour or so.


This.

Your RAMs spec will determine the 'sweet spot' for the system clock -- essentially 240 or 250MHz with the RAMs divider dropped back a notch to return your memory to spec speed.

Some motherboards will handle that clock without breaking a sweat -- then you work your cpu multiplier lower (actually takes stress off the CPU) to see how high she'll go with the bump in the system clock.

The IMC/NB will go 2400MHz without breaking a sweat, too, maybe even 2500MHz. Bump your NB volts a bit here (maybe to 1.1875v) for stability if necessary.

You said VCore at stock, right? :lol: 

Example: 14x250MHz = 3.5GHz with the IMC/NB at 10(stock)x250MHz = 2500MHz
(with DDR3 1333 & the divider dropped from 667 to 533)
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