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Hardware required to run 3 1080p 3D monitors at 120 fps ?

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December 13, 2010 11:07:14 PM

Hello,

I was wondering, what components would you need to be able to play games with 3 3D monirors (http://www.ncix.com/products/index.php?sku=57237) ?
I know that for the 3D effect to work, you must have at least 120 fps, but what hardware would allow you to obtain that on any game (like Metro 2033) with everything maxed out ?

I do not have the money anyway, but I am simply curious.

With the hardware I currently have, I'm only able to play Crisis (while never dropping below 60 fps) in 1080p (single monitor) with all the settings at medium, which is not very good...

I cannot guess what it would take to play it at the very high settings with 120 fps constant and a resolution of 5760x1080 !

Thank you for your time !
December 14, 2010 12:06:25 AM

I honestly thing there isn't any hardware today that could do metro 2033 at full settings in 3 large monitors at 120 fps
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December 14, 2010 2:32:53 AM

Vote of confidence for this being impossible currently. I doubt you're are ever going to accomplish this setup when using the most GPU intensive game on the market to be honest.
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Best solution

December 14, 2010 3:49:44 AM

yeah, even with like an insane set-up, Hex-core i7, triple SLI GTX 560s, 12 GBs DDR-2000 memory, SSD, you might be able to get around 30-50 FPS, but its hard enough to get 120 FPS on crysis with one 1080P monitor, yet alone 3.

You really want a set-up like this, or you just pulling our chain.
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December 14, 2010 4:12:13 AM

Yep, I wasted my time doing this. Here is a build for you, hope you have $4,500


ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS Black SATA 24X DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM

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Antec DF-85 Black Computer Case

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3x MSI N480GTX Lightning GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) 1536MB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

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SILVERSTONE ST1500 1500W ATX 12V 2.3 & EPS 12V SLI Ready 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Active PFC Power Supply

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Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound

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CORSAIR DOMINATOR GT 12GB (6 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 Desktop Memory with Airflow Fan Model CMT12GX3M6A1866C9

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ASUS P6T7 WS Supercomputer "Ultimate Gamer" choose 3Way SLI + PhysX at Real X16 X58 CEB Intel Motherboard$399.99

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Intel Core i7-980X Extreme Edition Gulftown 3.33GHz LGA 1366 130W Six-Core Desktop Processor BX80613I7980X

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Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit 1-Pack for System Builder

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Mushkin Enhanced Callisto Deluxe MKNSSDCL240GB-DX 2.5" 240GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD

$419.00


Subtotal: $4,433.89
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December 14, 2010 4:38:24 AM

mattius92 said:
yeah, even with like an insane set-up, Hex-core i7, triple SLI GTX 560s, 12 GBs DDR-2000 memory, SSD, you might be able to get around 30-50 FPS, but its hard enough to get 120 FPS on crysis with one 1080P monitor, yet alone 3.

You really want a set-up like this, or you just pulling our chain.


In fact, my question was more, is it possible to do (in 2010-2011), or are video games too advanced for our current hardware technology, which, if it's the case, I find kind of ironic, if you ask me !

And if this continue, one day, we'll be able to create a real AI, but won't be able to "boot" it lol !
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December 14, 2010 9:02:21 AM

Its more that bleeding edge technology strains systems as it is on just a single screen

In 4-6 years, sure, it'll be possible.
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December 14, 2010 12:11:40 PM

You don't need 120 fps to play 3D games. You need 120 Mhz monitors. The shutters are synced to 60 Mhz per eye. The fps is what it is and then cut in half (each frame has to be drawn twice, once for each eye).

If your goal is nothing short of 60 fps (120 fps split in half) at maximum visual settings on 3 monitors, then it's not going to happen on today's hardware. But if your goal is to just enjoy 3D surround, then it's entirely possible with today's hardware. Just don't expect to max everything out and expect the same performance as you'd get on a single monitor.
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December 19, 2010 3:05:57 AM

Best answer selected by al360ex.
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July 1, 2011 7:40:42 PM

Ok to better understand what it is you are trying to get at, let me take you a little bit into the film school realm.
It was discovered many years ago that for a picture to look real in film, it needed to be shot and played at 60 frames per second, well as you can imagine that would take film out of budget for alot of projects. So up until the makings of one George Lucas mixed with Sony and Panavision lenses to create a film quality on a video format (HD), the standard in film was 24 frames per second.

Now the NTSC standard (TV's before HD) consisted of 486 interlaces scan lines (aka 480i). Meaning it would have 2 sets of lines in the screen, each half was replaced at 30Hz. Therefor giving the old NTSC standard of 720x486 29.97fps 60Hz.

With the advent of High Def came progressive scan. Where instead of interlacing 2 images to create 1 image, it just does the entire image all at once, like how film would go through a projector. No loss of images and a better picture overall. So when you see a HDTV that is in 24p mode, that's like how you would see it on film at the theater. Or if you are going all out for 1080p, that means 1080 scan lines in progressive mode.

The Hz at which that is displayed is the refresh rate of that 1080 progressive scan lines. So if it's being displayed at 1080p 60Hz that is just how fast each frame is being shown. The higher the Hz, the faster the progression to the next frame is.

The Stereoscopic 3D technology combines the idea if interlace and progressive scan to create the 3D image you are seeing. Each eye is receiving a full progressive scan of an image at a time, and your brain then interlaces them to create the Image. Now once again the Hz at which this happens just means how fast it will refresh for you. So if you have a screen outputing 240Hz in Stereoscopic 3D, each eye is then recieving a 120Hz refresh rate.

Now how does this translate into Gaming? Lets say you are playing a game and receiving 50fps and your screens are outputing at 240Hz or 120Hz Stereoscopic 3D. Each eye is still receiving that 120Hz refreshed rate of the game being displayed at 50fps. In other words the hardware of the display to show you the images and the hardware of the PC to get the images to that display are 2 seprate things entirely. If they were depenedant on each other, that would be like saying that your standard 3D Bluray Player is more powerful than your Thousands of dollars computer.

So to run 3D on multiple monitors/projectors you need a video card that can send a signal to muliple monitors, and have the monitors able to support 3D. How the game looks while being displayed, that's where your PC's hardware, internet connection and cabling comes into play. The better it looks going to the display, the better its going to look overall.

If you don't believe me, get a 3d monitor, a cheapy computer w/ the minimum for 3d, plug in well lets say EQ2 because I know it's an online game capable of 3D, and hook it up to a dial up connection. You may only be recieving 1fps, but that 1fps will still be in 3D.

I hope you feel more informed and better educated.
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July 5, 2011 5:08:12 PM

Hy
I have found a very demanding demo to run on any pc..it's a 2160p resolution with some ducks in it. It has 3840*2160 screen resolution. Does anybody know what pc is needed to run this without losing fps? 10x
U cand find it here.. 2160p demo

http://filelink.ro/download.html
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January 12, 2012 8:53:11 PM

pircddrgn said:
Ok to better understand what it is you are trying to get at, let me take you a little bit into the film school realm.
It was discovered many years ago that for a picture to look real in film, it needed to be shot and played at 60 frames per second, well as you can imagine that would take film out of budget for alot of projects. So up until the makings of one George Lucas mixed with Sony and Panavision lenses to create a film quality on a video format (HD), the standard in film was 24 frames per second.

Now the NTSC standard (TV's before HD) consisted of 486 interlaces scan lines (aka 480i). Meaning it would have 2 sets of lines in the screen, each half was replaced at 30Hz. Therefor giving the old NTSC standard of 720x486 29.97fps 60Hz.

With the advent of High Def came progressive scan. Where instead of interlacing 2 images to create 1 image, it just does the entire image all at once, like how film would go through a projector. No loss of images and a better picture overall. So when you see a HDTV that is in 24p mode, that's like how you would see it on film at the theater. Or if you are going all out for 1080p, that means 1080 scan lines in progressive mode.

The Hz at which that is displayed is the refresh rate of that 1080 progressive scan lines. So if it's being displayed at 1080p 60Hz that is just how fast each frame is being shown. The higher the Hz, the faster the progression to the next frame is.

The Stereoscopic 3D technology combines the idea if interlace and progressive scan to create the 3D image you are seeing. Each eye is receiving a full progressive scan of an image at a time, and your brain then interlaces them to create the Image. Now once again the Hz at which this happens just means how fast it will refresh for you. So if you have a screen outputing 240Hz in Stereoscopic 3D, each eye is then recieving a 120Hz refresh rate.

Now how does this translate into Gaming? Lets say you are playing a game and receiving 50fps and your screens are outputing at 240Hz or 120Hz Stereoscopic 3D. Each eye is still receiving that 120Hz refreshed rate of the game being displayed at 50fps. In other words the hardware of the display to show you the images and the hardware of the PC to get the images to that display are 2 seprate things entirely. If they were depenedant on each other, that would be like saying that your standard 3D Bluray Player is more powerful than your Thousands of dollars computer.

So to run 3D on multiple monitors/projectors you need a video card that can send a signal to muliple monitors, and have the monitors able to support 3D. How the game looks while being displayed, that's where your PC's hardware, internet connection and cabling comes into play. The better it looks going to the display, the better its going to look overall.

If you don't believe me, get a 3d monitor, a cheapy computer w/ the minimum for 3d, plug in well lets say EQ2 because I know it's an online game capable of 3D, and hook it up to a dial up connection. You may only be recieving 1fps, but that 1fps will still be in 3D.

I hope you feel more informed and better educated.

I second this except one smart ass comment.
60fps wasn't because it looks real at that time it was because electricity runs on 60Hz so it was the maximum the electron ray could travel. in Europe it is 50Hz.
So then they figured that the picture can't be drawn that fast by the electron ray so they drew half of it (fields) which brings us to the 30fps (in Europe PAL has accordingly 25fps because of the 50Hz).
So motion-wise interlaced footage feels more fluid if actually shot that way since the half frames are recorded at a different time and its really 60 separate half frames.
Same slow camera pan in a theater with 24 full (progressive) frames for example is stuttering (freaks me out each time).

If you create interlaced footage out of progressive footage the "half frames" are actually the same content and time and will look the same as progressive. Only point is to play it on a interlaced device.

Remember pausing a VHS? how the freeze frame was flickering or jumping between two half frames on your old TV?
Or watch something on cable which comes usually as 1080i (interlaced) and stop it. it wont jump but show both half frames at the same time (on LCD or LED devices). A moving object will have streaky feathered edges because the object in one half-frame (every second line) actually moved further than in the other half-frame.

To get back to the topic, yes you need 120Hz display but how many new frames are rendered in 60Hz per eye is less important!
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