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New System Build will NOT BOOT?

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December 15, 2010 6:51:35 PM

Howdy...recently build a new system using recommended components off Hardware Revolution.com. This is my 8th-9th build and have NEVER had this problem beofore. Followed all the usual Instructions/Directions and such..using Minimal Components, but on Start Up get NO VIDEO? System "Fires" up...Lights Blink on front..Fans running inside, but No Video. Also CANNOT Turn system OFF using On/Off button on case..no matter How Long I hold it down. Have to Shut Off Manually using the PSU. And Ideas..Thoughts Or Suggestions will be GREATLY APPRECIATED!!! Thanks, Ron Taylor

More about : system build boot

December 15, 2010 7:00:13 PM

Recheck your connection to your mother board for the reset switch and such.
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December 15, 2010 7:06:03 PM

System specs?

Leroy51_70 said:
Also CANNOT Turn system OFF using On/Off button on case..no matter How Long I hold it down. Have to Shut Off Manually using the PSU.

That suggests problems with the power supply.

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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December 22, 2010 12:55:22 AM

christop said:
Recheck your connection to your mother board for the reset switch and such.

Howdy Ol' Buddy... Already have...SEVERAL Times....No uck!! Been trying to Figure out just What "Breadboarding"is...as another member Strongly suggested I do this...First?? Will get it though...Hehehe!!! Haven't had alot of time to work on this as the Holidays have kept me busy. Had X-mas with Grandson this last weekend and he's been here a few days. Now looking forward to Family one this weekend...NEVER any end to the...Fun...Hehehe!!! Thanks alot for all of your Suggestions!!! Keep them coming!!! Thanks Alot!! Yours, Ron Taylor
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December 22, 2010 1:07:22 AM

jsc said:
System specs?
Hey Thar' jsc... I REALLY do appreciate ALL of your Very Helpful Information here!!! As yet I haven't really had much time to try it. ( busy with the Holidays ) But I will!! I just today received an email from the PC Case Manufacturer.."NZT"!! They provided me with a rather detailed layout of the Leads and just Where they ... SHOULD?? ... hook to my particular Motherboard. As yet...haven't had a chance to give those a shot either. Been REALLY wanting to do/try this "Breadboarding" you've mentioned here. This is .. believe it or not?? .. the first time I've heard of this?? But undoubtedly will learn just what it is in amongst all the Info/Links you've provided me with. I will let you ALL know just How things turn out when I have some extra time to "Test Drive" all this Very Helpful Information. Thanks Again....ALOT!!! Keep them coming when and as I need them. Have a Very "MERRY CHRISTMAS"!!! Yours, Leroy5141 ( Ron Taylor

That suggests problems with the power supply.

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.

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January 1, 2011 9:30:54 AM

Hey Guys...ALL of You!! I
REALLY do Appreciate All of the Helpful Suggestions you have Offered here!! I had just got started on some of the "Troubleshooting" suggestions when I got hit with an Ongoing Medical Problem. Not as a way of Excusing my..."Lack Of"...but more as a way of letting you know Why I haven't been very Active on here lately..is that I was Diagnosed with "Cancer" ( Lymph..Stage4...Hosk ) around 3 years ago. After quite sometime of treatments and such ( 1 1/2 years ) I still get HIT...out of the Blue...with "Spells". These times come on Upexpected and out of the Blue. I recently got hit with one and have been the last few days in the Hospital...about 3 hours one way from where I live. I just got back Home yesterday afternoon and Usually am "Wiped Out"...Out on my Feet for a few days afterwards. NOT a "Sympathy Ploy" here...just letting you know the How and Why I haven't been Online here and letting you all know what's been going on. As I am able to procede with ALL of these suggestions/ideas I will keep you ALL informed on my progress. PLEASE try and be as patient as you can be with me on this. I will do my best to get On It as soon as I am able...O.K.?? One of the first things my Grandson asked me when I got home is IF I had "Our" Computer working yet so we could get back to Playing the Games he likes...Hehehe!! So again...Please...bear with me and know that I will get to it....soon. Thanks again Ever So Much for ALL of your Help and Understanding...
Your Friend, Ron Taylor ( Leroy51_70 )
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April 23, 2011 7:44:33 AM

christop said:
Recheck your connection to your mother board for the reset switch and such.
Howdy "Christop" I appreciate your Input/Info here concernig my problem. But checking connections/leads is one of the first things I did. To NO AVAIL!!! Really SORRY about the Delay in Replying here but have been dealing with alot of Medical Problems as well as Internet Conn. problems. Thanks for your Help anyway..
Sincerely, Ron Taylor
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April 23, 2011 7:57:13 AM

Howdy...To ALL of You have been Kind/Nice enough to reply and offer a number of Helpful Ideas/Suggestions in helping with my problem. I have..do date TRIED all of them. Although my PSU Testing Out just Fine...I purchased a New/Bigger one...it TESTED Fine also. I switched Memory..Vid Cards..pretty much every Component on System I can...still NO CHANGE? The ONLY thing I haven't tried yet is to unplug Leads and use a Screwdriver to Jumper across. Kind of Leary about trying that as I'm somewhat concerned it my cause somekind of Damage to System Components?? At this point in time I'm fairly certain that I'm looking at a Defunct...On/Off switch?? I've contacted the NZXT to see about getting a replacement, but as yet am STILL waiting to hear back from Anyone there? Does anyone out there happen to know of a "Generic" Switch I can purchase that will/would work with this Case?? Thanks again for ALL your Help and Advice!!! Yours, Leroy51_70 ( Ron Taylor )
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April 30, 2011 5:06:47 AM

Howdy jsc....
I want to "Thank You" for all your Helpful Advice Here!! I believe I had forgotten to mention that I have a Power Supply "Tester". You plug in directly into the ATX connector from PSU. There are a series of Five Green lights across the bottom reading .. left to right .. +12V..-6V..+5V..-12V and +3.3V. Then one more Green Light right above those saying "Power Good". And a "Clear" light just about that saying...."DANGER". When I first installed a Larger PSU...OCZ 700W...it TESTED just Fine. As did the one I had first put in this system when I built it...520W...Something? Can't recall the Brand Name right now and as I've taken the 700W one out now and put the 520W back in...can't see that Info. Anywho...when I finally managed to get back around to Try and Figure out What was wrong...following all the Advice I've received here...I Tested it-700W- again. It now shows the "DANGER"...clear light???? This is the reason for putting the smaller one back in...for now. As yet I haven't had a chance to Reconnect all the Leads...Mods..SATA and such. But am keeping this simple and will just connect the Basics...Vid Card...Memory...HD...CPU/HSF and a couple case fans. So should have more than enough POWER to supply these Items. Have to work on this during the Daylight hours as my Eyesight just isn't what it once way. So HOPEFULLY will have it all hooked back up sometime next week. Will let You and All the Ohters Know IF that resolves the problem with the On/Off switch??? Still have an Eerie Feeling I'm dealing with a Bad Switch though?? Again..."Thanks" so much all of your Help...ALL of You!!! Til' next time...take Care and God Bless... Yours, Leroy51_70 ( Ron Taylor


jsc said:
System specs?


That suggests problems with the power supply.

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.

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!