Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Internal speaker

Last response: in Systems
Share
December 16, 2010 6:34:41 PM
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 6:55:46 PM

You don't need it unless something goes wrong. If you were getting one, it would be with either the motherboard or the case. However, it's not really standard, and you don't really need it.

I'm hoping you haven't bought parts yet because there are some issues with that build.

#1: That GPU is an old one and thus a horrible choice. Spend a little more (like $20-40) and get the current generation HD 5770.

#2: That's an older board. I'd grab the ASRock 870 Extreme3 for about the same price. You gain USB 3/SATA III support, making it a lot more future proof. If you don't want to Crossfire later, grab the ASRock 770 Extreme3 instead.

#3: Get the Antec Earthwatts 650W for the same price. It'd allow you to Crossfire that 5770 I recommended.

#4: The F4 is a good choice, but I'd keep an eye on the F3 500 GB or 1 TB. They're really close to that price (with shipping) and aren't much slower.

#5: Get the cheapest SATA DVD burner you can find. There's no difference in the models, so don't pay more than you need to.

#6: I'd spend $10 more and get the CAS Latency 7 Ripjaws. They're quite a bit faster and would make a big difference if/when you overclock. If you're not overclocking, it doesn't really matter.

#7: I highly recommend spending more on the monitor. You shouldn't be considering a model that doesn't support 1920x1080 resolutions.
m
0
l
December 16, 2010 7:08:17 PM

MadAdmiral said:
You don't need it unless something goes wrong. If you were getting one, it would be with either the motherboard or the case. However, it's not really standard, and you don't really need it.

I'm hoping you haven't bought parts yet because there are some issues with that build.

#1: That GPU is an old one and thus a horrible choice. Spend a little more (like $20-40) and get the current generation HD 5770.

#2: That's an older board. I'd grab the ASRock 870 Extreme3 for about the same price. You gain USB 3/SATA III support, making it a lot more future proof. If you don't want to Crossfire later, grab the ASRock 770 Extreme3 instead.

#3: Get the Antec Earthwatts 650W for the same price. It'd allow you to Crossfire that 5770 I recommended.

#4: The F4 is a good choice, but I'd keep an eye on the F3 500 GB or 1 TB. They're really close to that price (with shipping) and aren't much slower.

#5: Get the cheapest SATA DVD burner you can find. There's no difference in the models, so don't pay more than you need to.

#6: I'd spend $10 more and get the CAS Latency 7 Ripjaws. They're quite a bit faster and would make a big difference if/when you overclock. If you're not overclocking, it doesn't really matter.

#7: I highly recommend spending more on the monitor. You shouldn't be considering a model that doesn't support 1920x1080 resolutions.

I was looking at that RAM too but it says that it's designed specifically for the intel P55 mobo so is it still ok to get it if I have an AMD mobo?

Also, are there actually like problems with this build, like it won't work, or is it just that I didn't buy "good enough parts"?
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 7:43:33 PM

That's just marketing. It's just fine.

They're more improvements. I'd say the biggest issue is the GPU, since buying that one is pretty much a waste of money.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 8:23:29 PM

I don't think that memory is compatible for your board, It's not listed on ASUS' QVL and G-Skill memory configurator (HERE), doesn't list it either. It won't hurt my feelings if you check behind me incase I missed something. I find that most of the time if it's not on one of those lists your comp won't even start. I don't see anything in G-Skill for the 1600 that's worth a crap, (meaning only single stick that you can buy 2 or more of but not any kits). Do you particularly want G-Skill or 1600MHz speed? They have these G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL7D-4GBRH for $60 a pair. Or if you'd like to try something else let us know, there's plenty other options out there.
I don't see anything wrong with the rest of the build - wellll except maybe the monitor. You might want something that's capable of 1080P resolution like your card is. Here's a nice one for only $160 and you will notice the difference in picture quality.
m
0
l
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 8:51:12 PM

The QVL lists aren't the end all be all of compatibility. It's just the sticks the company has tested and guarantees will work with the board. They can't test every single set out there. Basically, all sticks that are DDR3, run at speeds of at least 1066 mhz, and require less than 1.65V of power are compatible with any current board.

Further more, G.Skill is one of the top RAM brands. If their sticks aren't compatible with the popular boards, they'd be out of business.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 9:28:49 PM

I'm not trashing G-Skill, I only mentioned that the ones compatible for his board only come in single 2 GB sticks. There were no pairs at the 1600 MHz. And I agree that the motherboard companies only test a certain amount of ram before listing the board and they almost NEVER update their lists. But I find it hard to believe that G-Skill themselves make a list of compatible memory and didn't include that particular model if it works. (That's why I gave a link to their configurator). They list other models that are compatible and I suggested he get some of those if he didn't mind the 1333 speed. And I don't know about you but
Quote:
It's just the sticks the company has tested and guarantees will work with the board
That statement really says it all. I try to only recommend things that are guaranteed to work, not just what I think will or what I like to use. And I can guarantee you that you can't just stick ANY DDR3 memory module in ANY board and it's gonna work. One stick maybe, but when you want 2, 3 or 4 or 6 sticks to work you should stick with what someone else has tested and guarantee will work for all your slots. That's the whole reason mobo and memory manufacturers produce those lists.
Here's a question for you. I see you are running the exact same board that he is looking at. What is the model number of the memory that you are using? Is it listed on either of those two lists? If not then I'm sorry for restricting his choices, but I still can't recommend something without someone's guarantee of compatibility.
m
0
l
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 10:18:05 PM

That board is a dual channel board. That means two sticks. Technically, one stick isn't really compatible.

Also, to be technical, no 1600 mhz sticks are "compatible" with AM3 (or LGA1156 or LGA1366) boards. The default speed for the RAM is 1333 mhz. To get the sticks to run at their rates speeds, you need to apply an overclock to the CPU.

I wasn't suggest you could stick any DDR3 sticks into any board, I was suggesting that you can stick any DDR3 sticks into any DDR3 board. Getting them to run at their rated specs (i.e. the stated speed and latencies) might take some tweaking. As long as the sticks are DDR3 and use the proper amount of voltage, they'll work.

You'll be hard pressed to find an expert that takes much stock in the QVL lists. They're basically worthless. I can personally guarantee that those sticks will work with that board.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
December 16, 2010 11:21:24 PM

LOL Sure they are. You don't have to run two sticks of memory for it to work. For dual channel of course, that goes without saying. And yes, I also meant DDR3 sticks and DDR3 boards, thought that went without saying too. My bad. And you don't have to overclock the CPU to overclock the memory. There is usually a turbo or XMP setting in bios that automatically sets the timings and voltage for you to increase the default settings from 1333MHz to 1600MHz. That's why you will find some of the memory on the QVL listed at 1600 for that board. Because it will physically, technically work, at that speed, in all four slots, in that board, without all the extra "tweaking", Guaranteed. Yes, it means an overclock, but for the memory not the processor. And I'm really sorry, but if you find it hard pressed to find an expert that takes much stock in the QVL lists - Does that include the memory configurators from the memory manufactures also?, I wonder why every single mobo manufacturer, (and some memory manufacturers), takes the time and spends the money to test all the different rams and at all those different speeds, timings and voltages and post them on their websites as guaranteed compatible just for it to be basically worthless? WOW
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
December 17, 2010 12:59:53 AM

QVL's are for those who don't get it. Consumers like to have a pretty little list with some pretty part numbers so they can purchase that part number and have no worries. On top of that, Mad's helped me through some bizarre issues, I'd let that guy build my mom a PC.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
December 17, 2010 12:54:27 PM

OK, so you agree also that any DDR3 memory will work in any DDR3 motherboard? With all slots populated? So
Quote:
Consumers like to have a pretty little list with some pretty part numbers so they can purchase that part number and have no worries
means that if you stick to the useless lists and configurators you won't have any worries about compatibility and also if you don't use these tools then you can buy any DDR3 RAM and will not have any worries either? Or that you might have worries but you should be able to use it? Yeah, I don't get it. Sorry OP, other people don't agree with my statement that
Quote:
I don't think that memory is compatible for your board, It's not listed on ASUS' QVL and G-Skill memory configurator (HERE), doesn't list it either. It won't hurt my feelings if you check behind me incase I missed something. I find that most of the time if it's not on one of those lists your comp won't even start
and MadAdmiral can personally guarantee that those sticks will work with that board. Apparently I don't get it and use basically worthless tools. Guess I shouldn't use my personal experience and give you my opinion on the FORUM.
m
0
l
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 17, 2010 1:04:32 PM

We're not saying the QVL's are worthless, just that they're worthless to the typical home builder. The QVL's (and related configuation tools) are very dumb systems, meant to provide the very basic compatible options. Essentially, if your typical PC user were to want to slap a new set of RAM into their board, they could get the part number of the board, go to the QVL and look up a part number of RAM that without any doubt will work. However, if you're looking for more than your standard part, the QVL doesn't mean much.

Essentially what we're saying is that the QVLs are meant for people who really shouldn't be trying to mess with their computer. They're for the consumers who blindly follow what the manufacturer says without any outside resources. Will the sticks on the list work? Yes. Are they the only ones that will? No. Are they the best choice? Hardly ever. If the OP wanted the generic option, then the QVL is where you go. However, the OP came here, so they get the best option.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
December 17, 2010 3:49:11 PM

Well, he asked if he needed an internal speaker so I though I would give some basic help on guaranteed compatibility for the memory. Agreed, easiest thing to do for basic users. That's why I said that I didn't think it was compatible not that it definitely wouldn't work. He can buy the recommended stuff and just plug it in with no fuss. And I didn't mean to sound like I was trashing G-Skill - I was commenting on the fact that no kits of 2 were listed for that speed and he'd have to buy single sticks - and that wasn't worth a crap.

I don't know how to put this so don't take it wrong - but where do you find the best choice or the best option? Is it other peoples suggestions from what they've tried or is there fact sheets, pages. websites or something tangible that others can use. You guaranteed that those particular model of sticks will work in all four slots, did you use/try them? Or do you just know that if you tweak timings and voltages that anything will work? I must not be a typical home builder cause those are what I go by. I thought best option meant if I wanted 1800MHz speed I find one on the list that's compatible with as many slots as I will want, which is usually all, with the best timings already set. Not buy something that I have to play with for hours/days to find settings that will work, (and lose them if I have to reset cmos). So I'm just asking.

Oh, by the way, I think jack_attack wants you to build a computer for his mom LOL
m
0
l
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 17, 2010 4:18:59 PM

You want to know how I what's the best option? Experience and research. You read a ton of independent expert reviews (like here on Tom's, anandtech, etc.). You pour through countless performance charts. You pay attention to what parts are causing people problems. You check prices. You rarely just go to a manufacturer's website and look at what they say, as it's always biased, always incomplete and always out of date.

After you spend enough time researching, you begin to develop the knowledge of what works and what doesn't. Take a look around these forums. Look at how many times the G.Skill Ripjaws (or Ecos, as they were the same price for a while) get recommended for a wide variety of motherboards and builds. Do you really think that if they weren't compatible no one would have said anything?

Something else to clear up. I'm not saying that the sticks will need tweaking to work, I'm saying they might need tweaking to run perfectly at what the manufacturer says they should run at. Given that all DDR3 boards have a default speed of 1333 mhz, the 1600 mhz/CL 7 sticks would likely default to 1333 mhz/CL 6 or CL 7. They'll work and they'll be stable, but they won't be performing at their highest level. To get everything out of them that you possibly can, you'll likely have to change some of the settings in BIOS. You'll likely have to bump the speed on the CPU up slightly (not enough to need an aftermarket HSF), or you'll likely have to play around with the RAM settings without touching the CPU. Either way, you're getting a better running machine.

I should also point out that even if you bought sticks that were on the QVL, you would likely need to do this anyway. There are numerous stability issues that can arise by improper RAM settings. Leaving things at the default values simply isn't good for stability. You need to tweak to prevent issues. It's just a fact of building a computer.
m
0
l
December 17, 2010 8:07:39 PM

Ok sooooo, does that RAM work with that mobo or not? I was aware i would have to set the proper voltage, timings, and speed but what were you talking about OCing the CPU? P.S. I already bought all of the parts from MY ORIGINAL POST so i cant change anything now.
m
0
l
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
December 17, 2010 8:10:43 PM

Your RAM will be fine.

What I was referencing with the OCing the CPU is that you might need to apply a slight overclock to the CPU to get the RAM running at the proper settings. Since the CPU clock speed and RAM speed are related, to increase the RAM from the board's default of 1333 mhz to 1600 mhz, you might need to adjust the CPU's speed. You might not have to either.
m
0
l
December 17, 2010 8:46:15 PM

MadAdmiral said:
Your RAM will be fine.

What I was referencing with the OCing the CPU is that you might need to apply a slight overclock to the CPU to get the RAM running at the proper settings. Since the CPU clock speed and RAM speed are related, to increase the RAM from the board's default of 1333 mhz to 1600 mhz, you might need to adjust the CPU's speed. You might not have to either.

Ok thanks for clearing that up for me!
m
0
l
!