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I wasn't sure where to put this, so here it is

Last response: in CPUs
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a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 6:39:17 AM

I am thinking about what I want to be when I get older, something I would like to do and get a good pay. I am not sure what all of the computer positions are and how much people get paid for them either. I like working with computer hardware and messing with things in them like the BIOS and setting and things like that. (I mean, come on, who doesn't?) What would a job be that works with hardware and gets a pay around 80k a year? I didn't know where to look to ask questions but people on the forum seem like they know a lot, so I turned to Tom's.

P.S. I know this shouldn't be in this category, but I didn't know were else to put it.

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a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 6:57:08 AM

Hey, I think I found something that suits me pretty well, a computer hardware engineer. I am not too into software and math though. Is there a job out that will not require a lot of math and software skills? I am willing to learn and push myself to do something that I think I will like, but I was aiming more towards only hardware. Is there anything closer than that to what I want to do?
a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 8:16:33 AM

Math is always necessary in computer fields
also the ability to learn and utilize software
is necessary
from using MSOffice (powerpoint,publisher,outlook) to communicate
effectively to learning Linux,networking etc

There is no easy way
the trick is to find something you love to do
and make money at it
the hard work from doing something you love
will actually seem fun
From what I understand Dell started as guys building custom machines in their
college dorm
find a business need not being met in the market
and do it well for a reasonable price
a Comptia A+ certificaion is where you would start
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a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 8:30:00 AM

Not that pays that much. Tech junkies like you mentioned are a dime a dozen. Perhaps the manager of the store, but the guy doing the hardware diagnostics, etc doesn't make anywhere near that. You could always try to start your own business doing that, but remember that most fail.

Keep in mind that while its fun to work on computers, people will want you to know what your doing, and prove it. This means you'll need certificates and degrees. A+ is a start, an AA or BS in a computer science field will help as well. Getting MS network certified should also be done, but you won't need it to start.
a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 4:04:02 PM

I am just a A+ cert hardware hack and I do ok but I am lucky
that with the economy being rough alot of people are
getting their computers fixed or buying refurbed computers
instead of new ones.

What 4745454b is said is very true

You really need to get at least an Associates degree in computer
science and as many different certifications you can.

There are thousands of "Google Techs" out there
Just check Craigslist computer section and you can
see all of them there.
a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 4:20:26 PM

Thanks guys! I will look into those degrees and certificates too. Most of all, thanks for not bashing me for posting this on the CPU section. :lol:  Maybe hacking, but I was thinking more hardware, is the closest thing to working with hardware a computer hardware engineer?
a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 10:20:06 PM

I think it depends on what you mean by "computer hardware engineer". To me that sounds like the guy designing the PCB, not replacing it when it goes bad. The guy working on the hardware itself when the customer comes in with the complaint would have the word "tech" somewhere. Problem is "tech" won't make $80/yr.

Edit: You might not want to write off being a tech. A college friend of mine works for the IT dept of a medium sized business. Right out of college he signed up and gets ~$17/hr. Not bad money for the area he lives. Not $80K, but he gets to work with all the hardware that goes wrong. Realize also that I said right out of college, so you'd need to get a BS in some computer field like he and I did.
a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 10:35:10 PM

4745454b said:
I think it depends on what you mean by "computer hardware engineer". To me that sounds like the guy designing the PCB, not replacing it when it goes bad. The guy working on the hardware itself when the customer comes in with the complaint would have the word "tech" somewhere. Problem is "tech" won't make $80/yr.

Well, I know I won't get paid 80k a year for replacing hardware, heck, I can do that now. :lol:  I mean the computer hardware engineer where you type code , build new tech, oversee people put in the new hardware, etc.
a b à CPUs
March 13, 2011 10:37:45 PM

Quote:
Engineer or Technician OP?

Well, I looked up engineer, what does a technician do?
!