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A-Power Psu + Radeon 6850 = suicide?

So I've been looking around and I've been reading lots of negative feedback on my Psu:

* A-Power AK 750W 20+4-pin ATX Power Supply

* General Features:
* Black metallic finish
* 750-watts total power
* 110V, 220V switchable power supply
* 120 mm Fan
* Cooler and quieter operation
* Sleeved cables
* One (1) 16-inch 20+4-pin ATX power connector
* One (1) 16-inch 4-pin 12V power connector
* Four (4) large Molex 4-pin power connectors
* Two (2) SATA power connectors
* One (1) small floppy power connector
* One (1) 6/8-pin PCI Express power connector

* Power Specifications:
* 110/220V, 50/60 Hz
* +3.3V, 28A
* +5V, 30A
* +12V, 22A
* +12V, 22A
* -12V, 0.6A
* +5Vsb, 2A

(Revision 3/14/2011)
Power Specifications:
115/230V, 50/60 Hz
+3.3V, 25A
+5V, 28A
+12V1, 27A
+12V2, 27A
-12V, 0.5A
+5Vsb, 3A

* Dimensions:
* 5.5 x 6 x 3.25-inches (L x W x D, approximate)

* Regulatory Approvals:
* FCC
* CE
* RoHS compliant

I had my computer built at a store and I had no idea of whether it was good or not,
I was on a budget and had no idea how to setup a computer of my own.
The thing is, so far, I have had no problems with it so far. It has been great for a good (about) half a year.
However, I was wondering if I tried to upgrade from an Asus 1024MB GeForce 9500 GT,
to a Radeon HD 6850, would that just be asking for trouble?
I hear it is not the best psu in the world, but if it could keep from exploding and support the upgrade I'd be happy.
If not then I guess I can stick with it until I can afford another Psu.

If it could work, then I have one last question about the installation.
Would the card come with instructions/manual? I'm not sure when I read about pins from the power supply I'm supposed to plug in?
Would I just be taking out the 9500 gt and sticking in the new one into the slot?
I can read but I think some visuals would reassure me more of what I'm doing.

I'm sorry if I'm asking such simple questions.
But I hope you can forgive me for my lack of computer knowledge and help me.
I'd be grateful for any feedback.

Here's the system specs if needed:

Operating System
MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

CPU
AMD Athlon II X4 635
Propus 45nm Technology

RAM
4.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 666MHz (9-9-9-24)

Motherboard
BIOSTAR Group TA890GXB HD (CPU 1)

Graphics
ASUS VH198 (1440x900@60Hz)
1024MB GeForce 9500 GT (ASUStek Computer Inc)

Hard Drives
488GB Hitachi Hitachi HDS721050CLA362 ATA Device (SATA)

Optical Drives
TSSTcorp CDDVDW SH-S223L ATA Device

Audio
Realtek High Definition Audio
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about power radeon 6850 suicide
  1. Your 750watt PSU has the specs of a 500watt. All I can say is that having quality PSU is the most important part in the computer since when something happens the crappy ones tend to take other components with them when they die!
  2. Best answer
    suicide,homicide,genocide take your pick that psu is so bad i wouldn even flush it down a toilet

    lil red switch on the back,lack of pfc
    surely not 80+ certified
    pathetic 12v output which is no more then 30 amps i asume

    for reference 30 amps on the 12v rail = 360 watts when using the formula amps x volts = watts

    but im almost certian that is a leadman 250 watt psu wich is a very expensive door stop
  3. Well, after giving the stickied posts a good read,
    this psu is very misleading. A little while ago, I opened up the computer thinking,
    "Cool, 750w? Must be good."

    Thanks to the forums, and your replies, I know better.
    Now I know a bit better about the importance of amps, and the 80+ certified, etc.

    So I'm guessing these would be better?
    *dadiggles suggestion

    *best rating
  4. here is a review of a very crapy psu:
    http://psurepair.freeforums.org/codegaw-550xa-550w-review-t59.html
    as you can see, these lousy PSUs can explode at half load or less!
  5. current best deal

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371021

    more power then the seasonic and better then the old tx 650
  6. Best answer selected by kroobs.
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