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CPU Stuck to Heat Sink - How can I remove?

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March 14, 2011 12:42:09 PM

I removed a heat sink from a MOBO and the CPU is stuck to the bottom. Can anyone suggest how I can remove the CPU from the heat sink without damaging the pins? :hello: 
a b à CPUs
March 14, 2011 1:10:29 PM

http://www.wikihow.com/Remove-a-Processor-Fused-to-a-He...

You can drip some sanitary alcohol at the contact area and let it soak for a while. Then try to rotate the CPU. Don't use a screwdriver. Usually is easier to remove just after you used it in the PC and it's warm.
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March 14, 2011 1:23:50 PM

Thanks. I'll try that. It was removed because I could never start the board...so it was never warm. :D 
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a c 108 à CPUs
March 14, 2011 8:25:20 PM

tizzyloucat said:
Thanks. I'll try that. It was removed because I could never start the board...so it was never warm. :D 


Hair dryer.

If one of those is not handy, bake it in the oven at 350 until the juices run clear :D 


(if your warm setting is in the range of 150 degrees or so you should be safe)
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a b à CPUs
March 14, 2011 8:29:11 PM

Do not listen to wisecracker...Don't bake the processor in the oven

Use a hair dryer but be careful not to overheat the processor.Do it for a couple seconds at a time, don't hold it on it directly.Then try to rotate it again.Repeat as needed.

Is the proccessor stuck in the mobo socket or on the heatsink?
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March 14, 2011 9:08:15 PM

The processor is stuck to the heat sink.
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March 14, 2011 9:09:11 PM

Quote:
Is it stuck with thermal glue or just dense paste?

-faye kane, idiot savant


Stuck with thermal glue -- silver.
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a b à CPUs
March 14, 2011 10:17:27 PM

Try heating it up with the hair dryer.It will make it moist.But like i said be careful because the procesor will overheat.Do it in small increments.

Or you can soak it in warm water or just water.As long as theirs no electricity going to the chip then it won't short out.Just make sure it's fully dry before you use it.
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March 14, 2011 10:29:41 PM

As in a bowl of water? How about a bowl of alcohol? I know alcohol loosens silver...
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a b à CPUs
March 14, 2011 10:35:00 PM

You can do alcohol too but which kind are you going to use?
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March 14, 2011 10:38:26 PM

Rubbing alcohol
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a b à CPUs
March 14, 2011 10:39:29 PM

Thats fine.What percentage is it?

Just make sure it drys fully before you use it.I mean let it dry for a couple hours.
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Best solution

a c 198 à CPUs
March 14, 2011 10:46:11 PM

Thermal paste, i.e.

http://arcticsilver.com/as5.htm

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appmeth/int/vl/intel_ap...

Quote:
Thermal compound can easily be removed from hardware using the proper cleaners and tools: For general clean up, a cloth or paper towel will work well. Intricate cleaning can be accomplished with Q-tip swabs. An old toothbrush can often get the compound out of crevices that other tools cannot reach. Again, use ArctiClean 1 and 2 or high-purity isopropyl alcohol


or thermal epoxy / adhesive, i.e.


http://arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_thermal_adhesive....

Quote:
CAUTION!
Arctic Silver Thermal Adhesive is a permanent adhesive. Components you attach with Arctic Silver Thermal Adhesive will stay attached forever.
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March 14, 2011 10:57:57 PM

Best answer selected by tizzyloucat.
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March 14, 2011 10:59:25 PM

All of the suggestions were excellent and it was hard to choose the best one; however, I bit the bullet and ordered the Artic Silver Cleaner from New Egg. Thanks to all of you for your help!!
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a b à CPUs
March 14, 2011 11:16:40 PM

You are not going to remove that thing. What were you using in the first place?
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March 14, 2011 11:29:09 PM

HansVonOhain said:
You are not going to remove that thing. What were you using in the first place?


I used artic silver.
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a b à CPUs
March 15, 2011 1:11:18 AM

The cleaner they have is the same thing as rubbing alcohol.

"Again, use ArctiClean 1 and 2 or high-purity isopropyl alcohol"

What you bought is just some paste remover,thats not gonna help you remove the chip from the heatsink it's gonna help clean the thermal paste up.

I think your still gonna have trouble getting it off.Just dunk it in a bowl of %90 acohol.
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March 15, 2011 1:20:35 AM

I bought the Artic Clean 1 and 2 from New Egg. I will try the alcohol in the bowl before the Artic Clean gets here. Do you think I should put a pad under the pins to protect them? I still have the little black sponge like pad that came with the CPU. I just don't want to do anything to destroy the CPU. I don't want any more bent pins. I'm going to give it a try with the alcohol tomorrow and will post the results.
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a b à CPUs
March 15, 2011 2:08:23 AM

The standard correct way to remove the heatsink from a processor is to fit the processor in the motherboard and run the computer under full load to make the processor nice and hot then the heatsink should come easily off.
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a b à CPUs
March 15, 2011 3:15:41 AM

@pjmelect he's saying theirs a problem with the mobo and it won't boot.Thats why he can't do that.

I don't want anymore bent pins?You bent them or their bent?

Their should be no bent pins.All you do is set the heatsink + processor into the isopropyl alcohol and let it sit.Within minutes the isopropyl alcohol will start to eat away at the thermal paste like paraniahs.



The thing your buying from Artic Silver is the exact same as isopropyl alcohol
it's just has the Artic Silver logo on it.
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March 15, 2011 11:30:42 AM

pjmelect said:
The standard correct way to remove the heatsink from a processor is to fit the processor in the motherboard and run the computer under full load to make the processor nice and hot then the heatsink should come easily off.


With the heatsink still attached to the CPU how can I put it in the socket and run a full load. I won't be able to lock it down. Will I?
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a b à CPUs
March 15, 2011 11:53:34 AM

Any body else wonder why we have a CPU stuck to the heat sink and its NOT still on the motherboard????

You should Not release the lever on the CPU socket until after the heat sink is free & clear of the processor ............ (don't think that's even possible on an Intel. And the guy does mention "pins' so assume it's an AMD chip)

Release the clip that connect the heat sink to the socket assembly. Then gently rotate the heat sink back & forth. Then lift off the heat sink. If your paste has turned to concrete try the same process while applying a bit of hair dryer heat (though I've never needed this step). Then lift heat sink free.

And Finally, lift the lever on the CPU socket itself to release the CPU from the motherboard.....


""""
I removed a heat sink from a MOBO and the CPU is stuck to the bottom. Can anyone suggest how I can remove the CPU from the heat sink without damaging the pins? :hello: 
""""""
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May 17, 2011 8:20:31 PM

I'm checking this thread because I just pulled a cpu from a motherboard while
trying to get the heatsink only off. I didn't realize the cpu was "glued" to the
heatsink, so I just pulled firmly (arthritic fingers only) up on the heatsink, and
the cpu popped right out of the socket without using the locking lever. Now
I face the problem of putting the cpu in another mobo so I have to get the
cpu and heatsink separated. Since the cpu was warm (I'd just turned the
system off) I don't think more heat will help. I'm going to try levering one
whole side of the cpu with some kind of flat plastic strip.
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May 17, 2011 9:19:11 PM

It turned out that slightly twisting the cpu loosened it from the heatsink - problem solved.
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March 20, 2013 6:06:22 AM

Easiest thing to try first is just twisting it off - worked for me.
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April 14, 2013 8:08:55 AM

Here is my two long cents!! When I get something done that I found annoying I always try to help by writing out a longer guide for the next guy... yeah, I know, saint,

I had the same thing... deep cleaning a computer due to heat issues and I ended up pulling the large heatsink off and then finding that the heatsink took the processor out due to some commercial style glue used. Of course, this mistake ended up costing me a bunch of time. The large heat sink would not allow me to put the processor back.... see the arm couldn't be raised BECAUSE of the heatsink because of its size; therefore, you can't reinsert and try twisting to break connection so you've got to separate the two using other means.

O.K. twisting did nothing but make my hands hurt. I got so worried that I started thinking desparate like cutting the arm shorter on the socket with my handy dandy dremel cutting wheel which would give me the clearance needed to push the arm down and then finding adhesive putty to adhere it down (I KNOW, I KNOW, VERY BAD IDEA but it might of worked?!?) or chiseling on the chip which likely would have ended with a pretty piece of silicon. But see this thing was stuck!!! It was so stuck I even got confused as to where the chip ended and the heatsink began... googled a picture of a Socket 939 processor cleared that up.

If yours twisted right off then it was likely hardened compound not this epoxy like glue I encountered.

So using the above suggestions I gathered a couple of items: 91% Isopropyl Alcohol, bowl, small knife, a box knife's razor blade (essential), blow dryer, towel, and hammer (!!!!!). What follows is what worked... I'm not counting the steps of twisting and heating and twisting that didn't do anything.

1) I used the box knife razor blade and carefully trimmed all the excess glue all around the chip.
2) Filled bowl with Isopropyl Alcohol and gently put chip in keeping pins facing up in the bowl to protect them the best I could (this means you might need more than one bottle of alcohol based on your bowl)
3) Let sit over night in Alcohol. I don't actually know if the alcohol did anything because obviously the glue beyond the edge of the chip might not have been effected at all... but it was part of what I did to get the final success of the thing.
4) Remove from alcohol and set heatsink on towel chip up... Blow dry the hell out of it... I actually propped the blow dryer so it could run a few long minutes getting it nice and hot. I made sure that it blew on both chip and the copper backing of the heatsink to make sure that it softened the glue in between. It got hot... hot enough that I couldn't handle it with bare skin (means it was over 113 degrees). I looked it up, the chip can operate at a max range of 155 degrees (70 Celsius) so without electric current it probably has a damage point at a really, really high temperature. So I am guessing that a blow dryer won't hurt it.
5) Twist it off using towel to hold heatsink and fingers to twist chip. See that should have worked right? Well, mine didn't come off and trust me I put some grunting effort into it SOOOOO now is the time to grab small hammer and beat the hell out of it!!!! Just kidding, but do grab the hammer if it didn't work for you too.
6) While still hot and softened from alcohol. I took a small hammer and box knife razor blade. It looks to be the ideal tool. It has a small razor blade edge rigid steel body and is as long as the chip so it will apply even force along the whole chip. I positioned the blade so that it was at the meeting the point between the chip and heat sink (angled some to make sure the blade edge was at the exact point) and then very lightly (!!) tapped the blade and pop off it came off.
6) We all know not to touch the pins... keeping the oils of our fingers off etc... but if you twist and twist you've bent some pins. I found that using the box knife razor blade and inserting it behind first row of pins gave room to use another small knife to straighten those pins. Also used the box knife razor blade as a pry to gently line up the whole row of pins. Taking my time I was able to gently align and try, align some more and try until it (with no force) went into the socket again.

As stated earlier "Arctic Silver Thermal Adhesive is a permanent adhesive. Components you attach with Arctic Silver Thermal Adhesive will stay attached forever." But with the trimming of excess, softening with alcohol, and heating to reduce its effectiveness it just might take a small blow to break the adhesive strength of the thing.

Take the above knowing that it came from an idiot who shouldn't have pulled the heatsink out in the first place.... been amateur building computers and repairing since 1990 and turned a simple job into a nightmare. Good luck.
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August 13, 2013 12:17:15 PM

Spoiler
ssttuuky said:
Here is my two long cents!! When I get something done that I found annoying I always try to help by writing out a longer guide for the next guy... yeah, I know, saint,

I had the same thing... deep cleaning a computer due to heat issues and I ended up pulling the large heatsink off and then finding that the heatsink took the processor out due to some commercial style glue used. Of course, this mistake ended up costing me a bunch of time. The large heat sink would not allow me to put the processor back.... see the arm couldn't be raised BECAUSE of the heatsink because of its size; therefore, you can't reinsert and try twisting to break connection so you've got to separate the two using other means.

O.K. twisting did nothing but make my hands hurt. I got so worried that I started thinking desparate like cutting the arm shorter on the socket with my handy dandy dremel cutting wheel which would give me the clearance needed to push the arm down and then finding adhesive putty to adhere it down (I KNOW, I KNOW, VERY BAD IDEA but it might of worked?!?) or chiseling on the chip which likely would have ended with a pretty piece of silicon. But see this thing was stuck!!! It was so stuck I even got confused as to where the chip ended and the heatsink began... googled a picture of a Socket 939 processor cleared that up.

If yours twisted right off then it was likely hardened compound not this epoxy like glue I encountered.

So using the above suggestions I gathered a couple of items: 91% Isopropyl Alcohol, bowl, small knife, a box knife's razor blade (essential), blow dryer, towel, and hammer (!!!!!). What follows is what worked... I'm not counting the steps of twisting and heating and twisting that didn't do anything.

1) I used the box knife razor blade and carefully trimmed all the excess glue all around the chip.
2) Filled bowl with Isopropyl Alcohol and gently put chip in keeping pins facing up in the bowl to protect them the best I could (this means you might need more than one bottle of alcohol based on your bowl)
3) Let sit over night in Alcohol. I don't actually know if the alcohol did anything because obviously the glue beyond the edge of the chip might not have been effected at all... but it was part of what I did to get the final success of the thing.
4) Remove from alcohol and set heatsink on towel chip up... Blow dry the hell out of it... I actually propped the blow dryer so it could run a few long minutes getting it nice and hot. I made sure that it blew on both chip and the copper backing of the heatsink to make sure that it softened the glue in between. It got hot... hot enough that I couldn't handle it with bare skin (means it was over 113 degrees). I looked it up, the chip can operate at a max range of 155 degrees (70 Celsius) so without electric current it probably has a damage point at a really, really high temperature. So I am guessing that a blow dryer won't hurt it.
5) Twist it off using towel to hold heatsink and fingers to twist chip. See that should have worked right? Well, mine didn't come off and trust me I put some grunting effort into it SOOOOO now is the time to grab small hammer and beat the hell out of it!!!! Just kidding, but do grab the hammer if it didn't work for you too.
6) While still hot and softened from alcohol. I took a small hammer and box knife razor blade. It looks to be the ideal tool. It has a small razor blade edge rigid steel body and is as long as the chip so it will apply even force along the whole chip. I positioned the blade so that it was at the meeting the point between the chip and heat sink (angled some to make sure the blade edge was at the exact point) and then very lightly (!!) tapped the blade and pop off it came off.
6) We all know not to touch the pins... keeping the oils of our fingers off etc... but if you twist and twist you've bent some pins. I found that using the box knife razor blade and inserting it behind first row of pins gave room to use another small knife to straighten those pins. Also used the box knife razor blade as a pry to gently line up the whole row of pins. Taking my time I was able to gently align and try, align some more and try until it (with no force) went into the socket again.

As stated earlier "Arctic Silver Thermal Adhesive is a permanent adhesive. Components you attach with Arctic Silver Thermal Adhesive will stay attached forever." But with the trimming of excess, softening with alcohol, and heating to reduce its effectiveness it just might take a small blow to break the adhesive strength of the thing.

Take the above knowing that it came from an idiot who shouldn't have pulled the heatsink out in the first place.... been amateur building computers and repairing since 1990 and turned a simple job into a nightmare. Good luck.


You just saved my life, dude. Thank you!

FYI this works with only the box knife razor, even without heating. Simply shave away the paste around the CPU, place the blade of the razor along one side, and carefully dig a bit into the soft copper right where CPU and heatsink meet. Then pry the blade diagpnally, ever so gently, into whatever crack exists, and press the blunt side down onto the heatsink. Repeat if necessary. I did pour some alcohol onto it before trying.

Cheers!
-Andrew
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February 1, 2014 3:37:38 PM

Just saved my bacon as well! The cooling fan pulled the chip right out of the mobo!!!

Soaked in 70% isopropyl alcohol for about 30 minutes and the single edged razor blade popped the chip off with not much trouble. Bend a few pins back into shape and back into the mobo. It's running much cooler than it was a few hours ago.

One weird thing though. When I powered up the Win 7 PC it went straight into the BIOS settings saying that a NEW cpu was discovered. Any idea why it would think the CPU was new??

F
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