Disable AMD PowerNow or AMDK7.SYS?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I'm using my laptop (Athlon XP-M 3000+) as a desktop replacement
and I want to disable PowerNow completely in WinXP so it will always
run in full throttle. I have my power scheme set to "Alway On" but
still the CPU doesn't seem to run > 800MHz. The max speed should be
1.6GHz..

It seems the driver "amdk7.sys" manages the PowerNow functionality.
Is there any way to disable this unwanted feature?

Thanks!

Bram
4 answers Last reply
More about disable powernow amdk7
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    On 15 Feb 2005 02:30:42 -0800, spamdustbin@yahoo.com (Bram) wrote:

    >I'm using my laptop (Athlon XP-M 3000+) as a desktop replacement
    >and I want to disable PowerNow completely in WinXP so it will always
    >run in full throttle. I have my power scheme set to "Alway On" but
    >still the CPU doesn't seem to run > 800MHz. The max speed should be
    >1.6GHz..
    >
    >It seems the driver "amdk7.sys" manages the PowerNow functionality.
    >Is there any way to disable this unwanted feature?
    >


    Perhaps it is the machine trying to keep itself from overheating. I'd
    start by checking the temp with speedfan or similar.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Bram wrote:
    > I'm using my laptop (Athlon XP-M 3000+) as a desktop replacement
    > and I want to disable PowerNow completely in WinXP so it will always
    > run in full throttle. I have my power scheme set to "Alway On" but
    > still the CPU doesn't seem to run > 800MHz. The max speed should be
    > 1.6GHz..
    >
    > It seems the driver "amdk7.sys" manages the PowerNow functionality.
    > Is there any way to disable this unwanted feature?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Bram

    I don't understand why you would want full throttle when the CPU is
    doing nothing? From what I can see with AMD PowerNow, it does nothing
    to stand in the way of full CPU performance when needed, and when full
    CPU performance is not needed, all PN does is throttle down the voltage
    to conserve power. Do you have any evidence that PN is a barrier to
    utilizing the full CPU power when it is called?

    Q
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > Do you have any evidence that PN is a barrier to utilizing the full CPU
    > power when it is called?

    Yes, it seems that sometimes when the processor (in throttled down state)
    suddenly reaches 100% it will never enter the state that brings it up to
    full speed. Resulting in my case in an "audio stutter".

    I'm developing an audio/music application that can be very CPU intensive
    and for measuring/benchmarking purposes I would like my CPU readings to
    be fully accurate (e.g. "adding reverb to this channel adds 5% CPU load"
    etc.).

    cheers,

    Bram
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > I'm developing an audio/music application that can be very CPU
    intensive
    > and for measuring/benchmarking purposes I would like my CPU readings
    to
    > be fully accurate (e.g. "adding reverb to this channel adds 5% CPU
    load"

    If you know that the driver is AMDK7.SYS then just search the registry
    for the entry that loads it, and delete that entry, restart and see
    what happens. But it's probably not a good idea. The thermal management
    system was designed with the assumption that it would be able to
    throttle. It's possible - probable, even - that running at 100%, it
    will overheat and will then either throttle itself back automatically,
    or damage the PC.
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