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PC Attempts to Boot, Then Restarts

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March 15, 2011 4:05:02 PM

Hello,

I don't know where to put this thread.

When I hit the power button, my PC will power on - all fans and lights will turn on for about 5 seconds - then it will shut off. And then it will power on, and then power off... It will continue this process until I kill the power from the PSU.

During the power on process, it never makes it to POST before shutting off, so I can't give you a POST message error.

What's the deal?

i7 920
6GB
GTX 470
Kingwin 730watt
Gigabyte ex58-ud3r

More about : attempts boot restarts

March 15, 2011 7:12:51 PM

Gee, where to start:
Power supply is too small, weak, or failing
Incompatible components: e.g., have you installed anything new lately? RAM gone bad (test by pulling a stick, then the other, switch 'em), overclocked and cooked the Northbridge, CPU fan bad.
Graphics card is weak or failing
extremely dirty

Start there and good luck....
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March 15, 2011 9:38:17 PM

dist0rt said:
Hello,

I don't know where to put this thread.

When I hit the power button, my PC will power on - all fans and lights will turn on for about 5 seconds - then it will shut off. And then it will power on, and then power off... It will continue this process until I kill the power from the PSU.

During the power on process, it never makes it to POST before shutting off, so I can't give you a POST message error.

What's the deal?

i7 920
6GB
GTX 470
Kingwin 730watt
Gigabyte ex58-ud3r



Had similair prob my mobo went though nd that was caus i tried to change ram timings.... try taking Cmos battery out nd putting back in might fix or swapping RAM nd trying there are many possibilities wat wer u doin before if bombed out?
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March 16, 2011 1:02:10 AM

yo-ma-se-naai said:
Had similair prob my mobo went though nd that was caus i tried to change ram timings.... try taking Cmos battery out nd putting back in might fix or swapping RAM nd trying there are many possibilities wat wer u doin before if bombed out?
This post is so poorly written as to be all but unintelligible. Submissions written this way demean not only the writer but this forum as well.
If a writer is too busy, or lazy, to at least attempt to be coherent in their offerings, then they waste the time of those that they are trying to help - or others who may benefit from their experience.
If one has never learned even the rudiments of English, that's fine; some are more fortunate than others. But to be unwilling to try - such should be as beneath yourself as it is unpleasant for me to have to say this.
Please forgive me if I have hurt your feelings.
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March 16, 2011 1:14:16 AM

The only hardware change I've made was a switch from a gtx 275 to a 470 in december. Before this situation, I was seeing some poor performance in my games. I ran tests from OCCT and prime95 to produce any errors, but it was all error free. I also ran a couple of passes of memtest on each stick of memory.

I'll try your suggestions tomorrow.
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March 16, 2011 1:50:00 AM

If you overclock it might have went unstable reset the cmos and try.
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March 16, 2011 2:00:17 AM

I don't overclock the cpu, gpu, or ram. But I will reset the cmos.
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a b ) Power supply
March 16, 2011 7:42:36 AM

have you put the ram in the rite slots. it needs to go in 1,3,5 not 0,2,4. i did this when i first got my i7 and had a similar boot problem.
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March 16, 2011 11:12:10 AM

Well then, the PSU would be my top suspect if this were happening to me. And I would go buy one from a store to which I could return it in order to test this assumption.
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March 16, 2011 5:00:44 PM

I built this pc back in 2009. I'm thinking it's the power as well. I tried all of the suggestions in here and it's still doing the same thing.

What I just tried one at a time:
Clear cmos.
Try each stick of ram individually in each slot.
Removed video card.
The case is pretty clean and I know temps are ok because I was just looking at those numbers just before this happened.
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March 16, 2011 11:08:09 PM

Cool, well I won't be able to buy it until the 25th, but I'll keep you guys posted.
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a c 144 ) Power supply
March 18, 2011 7:59:20 AM

In the meantime, you can do some troubleshooting to make sure.

Work systematically through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it. We spent a lot of time on this. It should find most of the problems.

If not, continue.
The following is an expansion of my troubleshooting tips in the breadboarding link in the "Cannot boot" thread.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
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March 18, 2011 9:37:57 AM

Outstanding diagnostic run-through jsc. May I add a couple of points for the Uninitiated who may encounter this thread later on:
jsc said:
Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
Depending upon the setting of the BIOS Halt On, it is possible to not POST when peripheral devices are attached but, say are faulty or have faulty wiring, or not attached at all. However, as stated above, the machine will usually warn you of the error and require the pressing of a "F" key in order to continue.

jsc said:
It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
In addition, it is possible to POST with any device being defective. As stated above, the POST only tests the interface. I have booted PCs and laptops with defective PSUs, Memory, Modem, RAM, Power Board, LAN, etc.
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March 18, 2011 11:50:35 PM

Noworldorder said:
This post is so poorly written as to be all but unintelligible. Submissions written this way demean not only the writer but this forum as well.
If a writer is too busy, or lazy, to at least attempt to be coherent in their offerings, then they waste the time of those that they are trying to help - or others who may benefit from their experience.
If one has never learned even the rudiments of English, that's fine; some are more fortunate than others. But to be unwilling to try - such should be as beneath yourself as it is unpleasant for me to have to say this.
Please forgive me if I have hurt your feelings.




It's not the fact that i was typing while i was occupied with other matters or simply being lazy i assumed the person is of a fairly young age and that he still understood what I was saying and i wasn't trying to be cryptic or "unintelligible" as you put it, but rather help the person since this is the main cause of this thread...
Further more i'm from South Africa so maybe my short-hand text isn't the same as yours and I apologize if I did cause any confusion... :pt1cable: 
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March 19, 2011 1:15:37 AM

Thanks for the further replies. I did manage to order the sonic psu, and it arrived at my house today. But alas I'm stuck at work for 4 more hours. I'll let you know how the new psu goes.
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March 19, 2011 5:47:27 AM

Well shoot, it looks like the psu didn't help. What left are my choices? Motherboard? (I'm going to keep this psu though because I feel like the old one is the cause of damage.)
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March 19, 2011 9:25:22 AM

All that is left is to follow jsc's procedural steps above. You did test the new PSU, didn't you? Such a unit is highly unlikely to be bad but its good to make sure.

Ouch! It's not the PSU - the RAM has been tested separately, and booting without the video card has been tried with all non-essential peripherals removed....
....you are down to the motherboard...
I am not a pro, like jsc, but I have seen lots and lots of motherboards destroyed by cheap PSUs.

I encourage my buyers to choose a quality PSU (I like Corsair, but pick your favorite) when I assemble a system for them, is because it is far more likely to give them a long-lasting system - which enhances their investment on return.
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March 20, 2011 5:44:55 AM

Take out the motherboard, replace the motherboard standoffs and remount the motherboard, i had a grounding problem were my pc would post a thousand times because it kept shorting.
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March 31, 2011 9:35:15 PM

Turns out that the BIOS became corrupted and Gigabytes tech has replaced the BIOS chip. I should be getting the board back tomorrow or Monday.
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March 31, 2011 9:38:52 PM

' just happy you got it resolved. Good luck now.
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March 31, 2011 11:46:22 PM

I wish that was my problem, you had the same issue as me except I had to get a new PSU ...
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!