Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Will it work?

Last response: in Systems
Share
December 21, 2010 1:05:06 AM

Hey all. I'm upgrading my old prebuilt. None of the original parts will be leftover except the case and hard drive.

I don't have a precise purchase date; mid-January at the latest, or tonight. Whichever.

My budget after rebates is in the neighborhood of $350

The most important usage will be gaming, least intensive will be web surfing and such. I do want this to be a solid system for basic computer usage for several years (not necessarily gaming though).

I do not need a graphics card, hard drive, case, monitor, mouse or keyboard.

I do want to be able to overclock, and I seriously doubt I will ever be looking to use SLI or Crossfire on this board.

My monitor res is 1920x1080.

If you guys think I should just wait for sandy bridge in a couple weeks (for savings if nothing else) say so.

Parts list:

Processor--
i5 760

Motherboard--
Gigabyte GA-H55M

RAM--
Corsair 2x 2GB

PSU--
550W 80plus modular

Other comments:

I do want the form factor to be MicroATX, basically I want to know if these parts will work with my old hard drive (SATA 3G). I also want to know if I should just wait for Sandy Bridge. Thank you!

More about : work

December 21, 2010 1:27:57 AM

As specified, your parts will function, but graphics must come from your graphics card.

Still, with sandy bridge only a couple of weeks away, I would wait.
Even the cheapest quad launched on Jan 9 should beat the i7-760. I expect the 2500K to be the gaming winner for a long time. Price estimate is $217.

The Asus P8P67-M-EVO looks like a very good motherboard.

Pricing is unknown, but expected to be reasonable.
December 21, 2010 2:29:24 AM

geofelt said:
As specified, your parts will function, but graphics must come from your graphics card.

Still, with sandy bridge only a couple of weeks away, I would wait.
Even the cheapest quad launched on Jan 9 should beat the i7-760. I expect the 2500K to be the gaming winner for a long time. Price estimate is $217.

The Asus P8P67-M-EVO looks like a very good motherboard.

Pricing is unknown, but expected to be reasonable.



I have a graphics card from the current PC I got a little while back I'll be moving to the new build. Thank you for the reply.

The honest truth is I really shouldn't spend more than $375-ish on this build. I really WANT to, I just know that money will probably be nice later. My only concern in waiting for Sandy Bridge is a motherboard will be twice as much as this one and probably won't even me Micro ATX
Related resources

Best solution

December 21, 2010 3:05:23 AM
Share

velllvet said:
I have a graphics card from the current PC I got a little while back I'll be moving to the new build. Thank you for the reply.

The honest truth is I really shouldn't spend more than $375-ish on this build. I really WANT to, I just know that money will probably be nice later. My only concern in waiting for Sandy Bridge is a motherboard will be twice as much as this one and probably won't even me Micro ATX


I have been planning on a sandy micro atx build at launch, using the 2500K, or possibly the 2600K. The cpu and motherboards are already apparently on sale in malasia. The prices there seem reasonable.
There are many micro-atx boards, but all except the one I referenced are H67 based which allows you to use the integrated graphics. It is not clear if a discrete card can be used in addition, or if it is instead of the integrated graphics. A moot point for me. I am getting an indication that the H67 chipset will support the K models, and I presume overclocking. That gives a much larger choice of micro-atx boards to pick from. Otherwise it has to be a P67 board, and the asus is the only mini-atx that I can find yet. Apparently a large supply of parts is being built up for a hard launch, so I expect minimal initial price gouging. I understand that the integrated graphics are quite good, perhaps on a par with a $50 discrete video card. That would be suitable for some types of games at modest resolutions. We'll see.
December 21, 2010 3:11:23 AM

The more and more I think about it the more and more I see future me regretting not waiting a month for a far superior build (albeit, one that may cost me a couple extra bucks). You've convinced me to wait. Thanks for the help.

I really doubt the lower end boards will solely rely on integrated-- it's clear these chips won't make it into prebuilts for a long time and there isn't a big enough micro-niche for people that need high performance processors without higher quality GPU's to make a board that supports the 2500K without card based support.
December 21, 2010 3:11:48 AM

Best answer selected by velllvet.
!